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WORKERS OF ALL COUNTRIES, UNITE! 



LENIN 

COLLECTED WORKS 
44 



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THE RUSSIAN EDITION WAS PRINTED 
IN ACCORDANCE WITH A DECISION 
OF THE NINTH CONGRESS OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 
AND THE SECOND CONGRESS OF SOVIETS 
OF THE U.S.S.R. 



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V. I. L E N I N 



COLLECTED WORKS 



VOLUME 
44 

October 1917 -November 1920 



PROGRESS PUBLISHERS 
MOSCOW 



TRANSLATED FROM THE RUSSIAN 
BY CLEMENS DUTT 

EDITED BY BERNARD ISAACS 



From Marx to Mao 




© Digital Reprints 
2014 

www. marx2mao . com 



First printing 1970 
Second printing 1975 
Third printing 1977 



10102—213 , 

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014 (01)— 77 



7 



CONTENTS 

Page 



Preface 35 

1917 

1. INSTRUCTION TO THE RED GUARD STAFF. October 30 
(November 12) 43 

2. TO THE PETROGRAD COMMITTEE OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.). 

November 2 (15) 43 

3. TO Y. M. SVERDLOV. Not earlier than November 8 (21) . 44 

4. TO THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR INFORMATION 
OF THE LABOUR PRESS OF AMERICA, FRANCE AND 
GREAT BRITAIN. November, prior to 10 (23) 44 

5. TO MAJOR-GENERAL S. I. ODINTSOV. November 15 (28). 45 

6. TO THE PETROGRAD COMMITTEE OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) 

November 25 (December 8) 45 

7. TELEGRAM TO THE ARMY IN THE FIELD. November 26 
(December 9) 46 

8. TO THE C.C. OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) November, not later 
than 29 (December 12) 46 

9. TELEGRAM TO THE COMMITTEE FOR ELECTIONS TO THE 
CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY, November 30 (December 13) . . . 48 

10. TO THE PETROGRAD COMMITTEE OF THE R. S . D . L . P. (B . ) . 

December 8 (21) 48 

11. TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO, December 8 (21). ... 49 

12. TO G. I. BLAGONRAVOV AND V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. 
December 8 (21) 49 

13. TELEGRAM TO V. V. VOROVSKY. December, after 8 (21) . 50 

14. TO V. V. OBOLENSKY. December 18 (31) 50 

15. TO P. A. KOZMIN. December 20 (January 2, 1918) ... 50 

16. TO CHARLES DUMAS. December 21 (January 3, 1918) . . 51 



8 



CONTENTS 



17. TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO. Decem- 
ber 30 (January 12, 1918) 52 

1918 

18. TELEGRAM TO L. M. KARAKHAN. January 3 (16) 53 

19. INSTRUCTION. Night of January 5 (18) 53 

20. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT 

FOR JUSTICE. January 7 (20) 54 

21. TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN. January 7 (20) 54 

22. INSTRUCTION TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. January, not 
earlier than 8 (21) 55 

23. TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD AND THE FOOD DE- 
PARTMENT OF THE SUPREME ECONOMIC COUNCIL. 
January 13 (26) 55 

24. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. January 13 (26) 56 

25. TELEGRAM TO KHARKOV AND MOSCOW. January 13 (26) . 56 

26. TO KARL RADEK. January 14 (27) 57 

27. TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. 
January 15 (28) 57 

28. TO N. I. PODVOISKY AND N. V. KRYLENKO. January 

15 (28) 58 

29. TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR MILITARY AF- 
FAIRS. January 17 (30) 58 

30. TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO. January 

17 (30) 59 

31. TELEGRAM TO KULLERVO MANNER AND KARL VIIK. 
January 24 (February 6) 59 

32. TELEGRAM TO ARTHUR HENDERSON. January 24 (Feb- 
ruary 6) 60 

33. TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HEADQUARTERS OF THE 
SUPREME COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. January 29 (February 11) 60 

34. TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HEADQUARTERS OF THE SU- 
PREME COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. January 30 (February 12) 61 

35. TO A. L. KOLEGAYEV. January 30 (February 12) ... . 61 

36. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. January 30 (February 12) 61 

37. TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO. January 30 
(February 12) 62 

38. TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO. January 30 
(February 12) 62 

39. INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY. February 14 63 



CONTENTS 9 



40. TELEGRAM TO KULLERVO MANNER. February 14 63 

41. RADIO-TELEGRAM TO CENTROBALT. Night of February 14 64 

42. TELEGRAM TO E. V. LUGANOVSKY, PEOPLE'S SECRETARY 

OF THE UKRAINIAN SOVIET REPUBLIC. February 15 . . . 64 

43. TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE MILITARY REV- 
OLUTIONARY COMMITTEE OF THE DON REGION. Feb- 
ruary 16 65 

44. TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO. February 17 . 66 

45. TO A. I. RYKOV. February, after 18 66 

46. NOTE TO V. N. PODBELSKY IN MOSCOW BY DIRECT LINE. 
FEBRUARY 22, 1918 . >T A TV^V 67 

47. TO THE C.C. OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.). February 22 ... . 67 

48. RADIO-TELEGRAM TO THE PEACE DELEGATION. Feb- 
ruary 25 t^i^ • i\/f a n ^8 

49. TELEGRAM TO IRKUTSK. February 27 68 

50. TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. March 4 69 

51. TO MARIA ANDREYEVA. After March 12, 1918, but prior 

to September 1919 69 

52. TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. March 11 70 

53. TO THE POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS BOARD. March 26 . . . 71 

54. TELEGRAM TO THE SOVNARKOM OF THE PETROGRAD LA- 
BOUR COMMUNE. March 28 . p/~^T) 72 

55. TO THE SECRETARY OF THE COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S 
COMMISSARS. March-April 73 

56. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. Not earlier than March 1918 and not 
later than September 1919 73 

57. TELEGRAM TO THE SOVNARKOM OF THE PETROGRAD 
LABOUR COMMUNE. April i\J\J X 73 

58. CONVERSATION WITH V. V. KUIBYSHEV BY DIRECT 
LINE. April, not earlier than 2 and not later than 4 . 74 

59. TELEGRAM TO THE C.E.C. OF THE SOVIETS OF SIBERIA. 
April 5 75 

60. TO THE C.E.C. OF THE SOVIETS OF SIBERIA. April 6 . . 75 

61. TO Y. M. SVERDLOV AND S. P. SEREDA. April 8 75 

62. TO D. P. BOGOLEPOV AND A. D. TSYURUPA. April 10 . . . 76 

63. TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR JUSTICE. April 15 76 

64. TO THE SOVIET AND WORKERS' ORGANISATIONS OF 
RYBINSK. April, not earlier than 15 77 

65. TO D. P. BOGOLEPOV AND I. E. GUKOVSKY. April 16 . . 78 



10 



CONTENTS 



66. TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI- 
NOVGOROD SOVIET. April 17 78 

67. TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE SIMBIRSK 
SOVIET. April 20 79 

68. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
April 21 79 

69. TELEGRAM TO P. F. VINOGRADOV. April, not earlier than 21 80 

70. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. April, prior to 23 80 

71. TO A. I. RYKOV. April 23 81 

72. TO THE PRESS BUREAU OF THE C.P.C. April 27 ... . 81 

73. TO RAYMOND ROBINS. April 30 82 

74. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. Not earlier than April 82 

75. TO P. P. MALINOVSKY. Between May 1 and 13 82 

76. TELEGRAM TO V. N. ANDRONNIKOV, REGIONAL BOARD 

OF NATIONALISED ENTERPRISES OF THE URALS. May 2 . 83 

77. TO THE C.C. OF THE R.C.P.(B.). May 3 83 

78. DRAFT OF A RADIO-TELEGRAM TO THE PEACE DELEGA- 
TION IN KURSK. May 6 84 

79. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. May 7 or 8 85 

80. TELEGRAM TO THE C.E.C. OF THE SOVIETS OF SIBERIA. 

May 8 85 

81. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. May 10 86 

82. TO M. G. BRONSKY. May 14 86 

83. TO RAYMOND ROBINS. May 14 87 

84. TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL. May 16 87 

85. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. May 16 88 

86. EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. May 20 . . 89 

87. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. May 20 90 

88. TO A. A. JOFFE AND V. R. MENZHINSKY. May 24 ... . 90 

89. INSTRUCTION ON THE REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF 
MAIN NAVAL HEADQUARTERS. May 24 92 

90. TO S. G. SHAHUMYAN. May 24 93 

91. TELEGRAM TO THE KINESHMA SOVIET. May 24 93 

92. TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV. May 28 95 

93. EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. May 28 . . 95 

94. TO THE EDITORS OF IZVESTIA. May 30 96 

95. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. May 31 96 



CONTENTS 11 

96. TELEGRAM TO THE VYKSA WORKERS. May 31 97 

97. TO THE AMERICAN SOCIALIST INTERNATIONALISTS. May . . 97 

98. TO A. A. JOFFE. June 2 98 

99. TELEGRAM TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN. June 2 99 

100. EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. June 7 . . 100 

101. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. June 7 101 

102. TO A. P. SMIRNOV. June 7 101 

103. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. June 10 101 

104. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. June 11 102 

105. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. June 11 102 

106. ADDITION TO THE TELEGRAM TO A. S. YAKUBOV, 

J. V. STALIN AND A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV. June 11 103 

107. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. June 11 104 

108. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. June 14 104 

109. TO THE COMMISSARIATS FOR EDUCATION AND PROPER- 
TIES OF THE REPUBLIC. June 15 105 

110. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. June 17 105 

1 105 

2 106 

111. TO N. P. GORBUNOV. June 18 106 

112. TO A. A. JOFFE. June 18 106 

113. TELEGRAM TO S. G. SHAHUMYAN. June 18 107 

114. TO I. E. GUKOVSKY. June 22 108 

115. TO THE SECRETARIAT OF THE C.P.C. June 26 108 

1 108 

2 109 

116. EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. June 26 . 109 

117. TO A. P. SMIRNOV, G. I. PETROVSKY AND I. E. 
GUKOVSKY. June 28 110 

118. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 30 Ill 

119. TELEGRAM TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN. End of June-not 
later than July 2 Ill 

120. TO A. A. JOFFE. July 1 112 

121. TELEGRAM TO L. B. KRASIN. July 3 113 

122. TELEGRAM TO D. Y. IVASHCHENKO. July 4 113 

123. REPLY BY DIRECT LINE TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN. July 7 . 114 



12 CONTENTS 

124. TELEGRAM TO S. P. NATSARENUS. July 7 114 

125. TO I. E. GUKOVSKY. July 11 115 

1 115 

2 115 

126. TO I. E. GUKOVSKY. First half of July 116 

1 116 

2 116 

3 116 

127. TELEGRAM TO THE VORONEZH GUBERNIA MILITARY 
COMMISSAR. July 12 117 

128. TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR NAVAL AFFAIRS. 
July 13 117 

129. TO N. I. PODVOISKY. July 16 117 

130. TELEGRAM TO THE PERM SOVIET. July 17 118 

131. TELEGRAM TO F. I. KOLESOV. July 17 118 

132. TO N. I. PODVOISKY. July 19 119 

133. TO S. P. SEREDA. July 19 119 

134. TELEGRAM TO S. P. NATSARENUS. July 24 120 

135. TO Y. LARIN. End of July-beginning of August .... 120 

136. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. July 121 

137. TO P. A. KOBOZEV, K. KH. DANISHEVSKY, K. A. MEKHO- 
NOSHIN, F. F. RASKOLNIKOV. August 1 122 

138. TO A. A. JOFFE. August 3 123 

139. TO J. A. BERZIN. August 3 123 

140. TO A. D. TSYURUPA AND V. L. PANYUSHKIN. Summer, prior 

to August 5 124 

141. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. August 8 125 

142. TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE 
BOARD OF THE FOOD COMMISSARIAT. August, after 8 . . 125 

143. TELEGRAM TO A. D. METELEV. August 9 126 

144. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. August 10 127 

1 127 

2 127 

3 127 

145. TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL. August 10 . . . 128 

146. TO TELEGRAM TO S. P. NATSARENUS. August 11 ... . 128 

147. TELEGRAM TO THE VOLOGDA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. August 11 129 

148. TO TELEGRAM TO A. Y. MINKIN. August 12 129 



CONTENTS 13 



149. TELEGRAM TO D. T. PETRUCHUK. August 15 130 

150. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. First half of August 130 

151. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. August 16 131 

152. TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA. August 16 132 

153. TELEGRAM TO S. V. MALYSHEV. August 17 132 

154. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO N. I. MURALOV. Not earlier 
than August 17 and not later than August 19 ... . 133 

155. TELEGRAM TO F. F. RASKOLNIKOV. August 19 133 

156. TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA. August 19 133 

157. TELEGRAM TO A. Y. MINKIN. August 19 134 

158. TELEGRAM TO THE PENZA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. August 19 135 

159. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. August 19 135 

160. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. August 19 136 

161. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. August 19 136 

162. TO N. P. GORBUNOV. Prior to August 20 136 

163. TELEGRAM TO THE TAMBOV GUBERNIA FOOD COMMIT- 
TEE. August 20 137 

164. TELEGRAM TO V. N. KHARLOV. August 21 137 

165. TO MEDVEDEV, POLITICAL COMMISSAR OF THE 1st ARMY. 
August 21 138 

166. TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL. August 21 ... . 139 

167. TELEGRAMS TO A. K. PAIKES. August 22 139 

1 139 

2 139 

168. TELEGRAM TO THE PENZA GUBERNIA COMMITTEE OF 

THE R.C.P.(B.). August 22 140 

169. TELEGRAM TO F. I. KOLESOV. August 23 140 

170. TELEGRAM TO A. G. SCHLICHTER. August 23 141 

171. TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA. August 26 142 

172. TELEGRAM TO A. P. SMIRNOV. August 26 142 

173. TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA. August 27 143 

174. TELEGRAM TO THE PENZA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. August 28 143 

175. TO V. M. ALTFATER 144 

1. August 28 144 

2. August 29 144 

176. TELEGRAM TO V. N. KHARLOV. August 29 145 



14 



CONTENTS 



177. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. August 29 145 

178. TO S. P. SEREDA. September 6 146 

179. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. September 10 146 

180. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. September 12 147 

181. TO GRIGORY NAUMOVICH, FOR THE GROUP OF STU- 
DENTS INTERESTED IN COMMUNISM. September 16 . . . 147 

182. TELEGRAM TO THE POOR PEASANTS' COMMITTEES OF 
YELETS UYEZD. September 17 148 

183. TO THE EDITORS OF PRAVDA. September 18 149 

184. TO L. B. KAMENEV. End of September-October 149 

185. TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. October 1 150 

186. TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE. October 7 150 

187. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA AND L. B. KRASIN. October 9 . . . . 151 

188. NOTE TO G. V. CHICHERIN OR L. M. KARAKHAN AND A 
LETTER TO A. A. JOFFE, J. A. BERZIN AND V. V. VO- 
ROVSKY. October 10 151 

189. TO G. V. CHICHERIN AND L. M. KARAKHAN. October 10 . 152 

190. TO J. A. BERZIN. October 15 153 

191. TO A. A. JOFFE. October 18 155 

192. TO A. A. JOFFE. October 18 156 

193. TO N. P. GORBUNOV. October 21 156 

194. APPLICATION TO THE COMMITTEE OF THE SOVIET JOUR- 
NALISTS' TRADE UNION. October, not later than 22 . . 157 

195. TELEGRAM TO P. P. SYTIN. October 24 157 

196. TO J. A. BERZIN. October 25 158 

197. TELEGRAM TO THE URALS ECONOMIC COUNCIL. October 28 159 

198. TO THE BOARD OF PROPERTIES OF MOSCOW'S PEOPLE'S 
PALACES. November 1 159 

199. TO J. A. BERZIN. November 1 160 

200. TELEGRAM TO THE COMMANDER OF THE 2nd ARMY. No- 
vember 1 161 

201. TO R. I. BERZIN. November, between 9 and 23 161 

202. TO B. S. WEISSBROT. November 11 162 

203. TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV. November 13 162 

204. TELEGRAM TO I. I. VATSETIS. November 15 163 

205. TO THE MANAGER OF THE PEOPLE'S BANK. November 19 163 

206. TELEGRAM TO THE TECHNICAL COMMITTEE OF THE ECO- 
NOMIC COUNCIL OF THE NORTHERN AREA. November 21 164 



CONTENTS 15 



207. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. November 21 164 

208. TELEGRAM TO V. M. GITTIS. November 23 165 

209. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. November 23 165 

210. TO THE BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE C.P.C. November 26 166 

211. CONVERSATION BY DIRECT LINE WITH B. M. VOLIN. 
NOVEMBER 29, 1918 166 

212. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. November 30 167 

213. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. December 3 168 

214. TELEGRAM TO THE TAMBOV GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. December 7 169 

215. TO L. B. KAMENEV. December 10 169 

216. TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. December 11 169 

217. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. December 12 170 

218. TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV. December 12 170 

219. TELEGRAMS TO L. D. TROTSKY 171 

1. December 12 171 

2. December 13 172 

220. TO G. I. PETROVSKY. December 16 173 

221. TO Y. M. SVERDLOV. December 16 173 

222. TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. December 21 173 

223. TO D. A. BULATOV. December 25 174 

224. TELEGRAM TO S. A. BANK. December 25 175 

225. TELEGRAM TO THE RODNIKI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
December 26 175 

226. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 

OF THE REPUBLIC. December 27 176 

227. TELEGRAM TO THE MANAGEMENT OF THE YUZHSK FAC- 
TORY. December 28 176 

228. TELEGRAM TO THE RODNIKI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
December 28 177 

229. TO THE LIBRARY SECTION OF THE COMMISSARIAT FOR 
EDUCATION. December 30 177 

230. TO S. P. SEREDA. End of 1918 178 

231. NOTE ON THE PUBLICATION OF LEAFLETS. End of 1918 178 

1919 

232. TO V. I. NEVSKY. January 1 179 

233. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. January 1 179 



16 



CONTENTS 



234. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR INTER- 
NAL AFFAIRS. January 1 180 

235. TO A. N. PROKOFIEV. January 3 180 

236. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. January 3 181 

237. TO THE VESYEGONSK UYEZD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND 

THE TVER GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. January 3 181 

238. TELEGRAM TO RYABTNIN. January 5 182 

239. TELEGRAM TO THE SIMBIRSK GUBERNIA FOOD COMMIS- 
SAR. January 6 182 

240. TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV FOR THE UFA REVOLUTION- 
ARY COMMITTEE. January 6 183 

241. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE CASPIAN CAUCASIAN FRONT, THE ASTRA- 
KHAN GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND GUBERNIA 
COMMITTEE OF THE R.C.P.(B.). January 7 or 8 184 

242. DIRECTIVE TO THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF. January 8 . . 185 

243. TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. January 9 185 

244. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. January 10 186 

245. TELEGRAM TO THE RYAZAN GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. January 12 186 

246. TELEGRAM TO THE SUZDAL UYEZD EXECUTIVE COMMIT- 
TEE. January 12 187 

247. INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY. January 13 187 

248. TELEGRAM TO A. P. KUDRYAVTSEV. January 13 ... . 187 

249. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. January, not earlier than 14 . . . 188 

250. TO THE BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE COUNCIL OF PEO- 
PLE'S COMMISSARS. January 18 188 

251. TO L. D. TROTSKY. January 21 189 

252. TO M. K. VLADIMIROV. January 22 189 

253. TO K. I. LANDER. January 23 190 

254. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. January 24 191 

255. TELEGRAM TO THE SAMARA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. January 27 191 

256. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. January 30 192 

257. TO L. B. KRASIN. January-February 192 

258. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY AND V. N. PODBELSKY 193 

1. February 10 193 

2. February 11 193 

259. TELEGRAM TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV. February 12 ... . 193 



CONTENTS 17 

260. TO G. I. PETROVSKY. February 13 194 

261. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE EASTERN FRONT. February 14 194 

262. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. February 18 195 

263. TELEGRAM TO THE YELATMA UYEZD EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. February 18 195 

264. TELEGRAM TO P. I. STUCKA AND J. A. BERZIN. Febru- 
ary 19 196 

265. TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV. February 19 196 

266. TO L. B. KAMENEV. February 21 196 

267. TO THE TEACHERS OF TVER GUBERNIA. February 22 . . 197 

268. TO CERTIFICATE TO REPRESENTATIVES OF THE DANILOV 
TEXTILE MILL. February 24 197 

269. TELEGRAMS TO M. K. VLADIMIROV. February 26 198 

1 198 

2 198 

270. TELEGRAM TO S. Y. TSEKHANOVSKY. February 26 ... . 199 

271. TO MARIA KOSTELOVSKAYA. February 27 199 

272. TO A. I. SVIDERSKY. Between February and early March 199 

273. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. March 4 200 

1 200 

2 200 

274. TO THE C.C. OF THE R.C.P.(B.). Between March 4 and 24 200 

275. TELEGRAM TO P. P. MYSHKIN. March 8 200 

276. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. March 8 201 

277. TELEGRAM TO A. L. KOLEGAYEV. March 10 201 

278. TO L. B. KAMENEV. March 12 202 

279. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. March, after 17 202 

280. TO G. I. PETROVSKY. March, not later than 22 ... . 202 

281. TELEGRAM TO V. N. KAYUROV. March 27 203 

282. TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSAR FOR INTERNAL AFFAIRS. 
April 2 203 

283. TELEGRAM TO G. N. KAMINSKY. April 4 204 

284. TELEGRAM TO THE COMMANDER OF THE 10th ARMY. 
April 4 204 

285. RADIO-TELEGRAM TO BELA KUN. April 4 205 

286. TO D. I. KURSKY. April, not later than 5 206 



18 



CONTENTS 



287. TO THE SARATOV SOVIET BODIES (GUBERNIA FOOD 
COMMITTEE, GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, CITY 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, ETC.)- April 5 206 

288. REPLY TO PEASANTS OF SKOPIN UYEZD. April 5 . . . . 207 

289. TO S. P. SEREDA AND A. D. TSYURUPA. April 7 207 

290. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN. April 7 . . 208 

291. TO RADIO-TELEGRAMS TO BELA KUN. June 16 208 

1. April 7 208 

2. April 8 208 

292. TELEGRAM TO THE KNYAGININ UYEZD LAND DEPART- 
MENT. April 8 209 

293. TELEGRAM TO N. N. KUZMIN. April 8 209 

294. TELEGRAM TO THE KAZAN GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. April 9 210 

295. TELEGRAM TO S. K. MININ. April 11 210 

296. TELEGRAM TO THE OREL GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. April 12 210 

297. TELEGRAM TO MAXIM GORKY. April 14 211 

298. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. April 15 211 

299. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. April 18 212 

300. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. April 18 213 

301. TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. April 18 213 

302. TO THE TAMBOV GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
April 20 214 

303. TELEGRAM TO I. I. VATSETIS AND S. I. ARALOV. April 

21 or 22 215 

304. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. April 24 216 

305. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV. April 24 216 

306. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. April 26 217 

307. TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV. April 26 217 

308. TELEGRAM TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN. April 26 217 

309. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. April 26 218 

310. PROTECTION CERTIFICATE FOR V. I. TANEYEV. April 26 218 

311. TELEGRAM TO L. B. KAMENEV. April 28 219 

312. LETTER OF RECOMMENDATION FOR V. S. MITSKEVICH. 
April 29 220 

313. TO THE PETROGRAD ORGANISATIONS. Second half of 
April 220 

314. TO L. B. KAMENEV. April 221 



CONTENTS 19 



315. TO MARIA KOSTELOVSKAYA. April 222 

316. TO J. E. RUDZUTAK. May 2 222 

317. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. May 2 222 

318. TO A. Y. BADAYEV. May 4 223 

319. TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO AND 

N. I. PODVOISKY. May 5 223 

320. TO G. V. CHICHERIN AND M. M. LITVINOV. May 6 . . . . 224 

321. TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK. May 7 226 

322. TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR SOCIAL SECURITY. 
May 10 226 

323. TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. May 12 227 

324. TELEGRAM TO M. I. KALININ. May 13 227 

325. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV. May 14 228 

326. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. May 15 229 

327. TELEGRAM TO A. V. LUNACHARSKY. May 15 229 

328. TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE ALL-RUSSIA CENTRAL 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. May 15 230 

329. TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV. May 20 230 

330. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. May 20 231 

331. TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK. May 20 232 

332. TELEGRAM TO THE NOVGOROD GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. May 20 232 

333. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. May 22 233 

334. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. May 22 233 

335. TELEGRAMS TO THE TAMBOV AND VORONEZH GUBER- 
NIA MILITARY COMMISSARS. May 24 234 

1 234 

2 234 

336. TELEGRAM TO THE ODESSA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
May 24 235 

337. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. May 24 236 

338. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. May 28 236 

339. TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE. May 29 237 

340. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. May 30 238 

341. TELEGRAM TO V. R. MEZHLAUK AND K. Y. VOROSHI- 
LOV. May 30 238 

342. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE CENTRAL COM- 
MITTEE. May 30 239 



20 



CONTENTS 



343. TO THE ALL-RUSSIA GENERAL HEADQUARTERS. May 31 . . 239 

344. EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH E. M. SKLYANSKY. May or 
June 239 

345. TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK, K. Y. VOROSHILOV 
G. N. MELNICHANSKY, F. A. ARTYOM, G. N. KAMIN- 
SKY. June 1 240 

346. TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK AND K. Y. VOROSHILOV. 
June 1 241 

347. INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY. June 2 241 

348. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 3 242 

349. TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV, M. M. LASHEVICH, K. K. YU- 
RENEV. June 3 243 

350. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 

OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT. June 3 243 

351. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. June, after 3 244 

352. TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH. 
June 4 245 

353. TO M. I. LACIS. June 4 245 

354. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 4 246 

355. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 4 246 

356. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV. June 5 247 

357. TELEGRAM TO A. S. BUBNOV. June 5 247 

358. TELEGRAM TO D. I. YEFREMOV, MEMBER OF THE REV- 
OLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL OF THE 10th ARMY. 
June 6 248 

359. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV. June 6 248 

360. TO L. D. TROTSKY. June 6 249 

361. TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH. June 6 249 

362. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. June 8 250 

363. TELEGRAMS TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH. June 11 251 

1 251 

2 251 

3 252 

364. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. June 11 252 

365. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 13 253 

366. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 16 253 

367. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) AND 
THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL OF THE RE- 
PUBLIC. June 16 254 



CONTENTS 21 



368. TO THE C.C., R.C.P. June 17 255 

369. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
June, prior to 18 255 

370. TELEGRAM TO M. M. LASHEVICH. June 18 256 

371. REPLY BY DIRECT LINE TO V. I. NEVSKY AND L. S. SOS- 
NOVSKY. June 20 257 

372. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT. June 21 257 

373. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. June 21 258 

374. TO A. I. SVIDERSKY OR A. D. TSYURUPA. June 23 . . . 258 

375. TELEGRAM TO M. M. LASHEVICH AND K. K. YURENEV. 
June 27 258 

376. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. End of June-beginning of July . 259 

377. TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. July 1 259 

378. TELEGRAM TO THE POROKHOVO DISTRICT SOVIET. 
July 2 260 

379. TO MAXIM GORKY. July 5 260 

380. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. July 5 260 

381. TO THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. July 8 261 

382. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 

OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT. July 8 262 

383. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. July 8 262 

384. TELEGRAM TO V. A. RADUS-ZENKOVICH. July 11 ... . 263 

385. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY, N. I. PODVOISKY, AND 

TO ALL UKRAINIAN MILITARY COMMISSARS. July 11 . . 263 

386. TO N. P. GORBUNOV. July, prior to 14 264 

387. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. July 15 264 

388. TO J. HANECKI. July 16 265 

1 265 

2 265 

389. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. July 16 265 

390. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. July 17 266 

391. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. July 18 266 

392. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE EASTERN FRONT. July 19 267 

393. NOTE ON THE INVOICE OF THE SUPPLIES DEPART- 
MENT OF THE MOSCOW EXTRAORDINARY COMMISSION. 
July 19 267 



22 



CONTENTS 



394. TO V. P. MILYUTIN AND P. I. POPOV. July 22 268 

395. TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. July 25 268 

396. TELEGRAM TO N. V. KRYLENKO. July 25 269 

397. UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION ON A TELEGRAM 
FROM P. I. VOYEVODIN. July 25 269 

398. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. July 28 270 

399. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. July 29 271 

400. TO BELA KUN. End of July 271 

401. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. August 3 or 4 272 

402. INSTRUCTION ON A LETTER FROM THE SIBERIAN AF- 
FAIRS COMMISSION. August 5 272 

403. TO L. D. TROTSKY. August 7 273 

404. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. August 7 273 

405. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU, C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 

August 8 274 

406. TELEGRAM TO YEVETSKY. August 8 274 

407. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA, M. M. LASHEVICH, G. Y. SO- 
KOLNIKOV. August 13 275 

408. TO YELENA STASOVA. August 13 275 

409. TO M. K. VLADIMIROV. August 14 276 

410. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA. August, not earlier than 16 276 

411. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCILS 

OF THE 10th AND 4th ARMIES. August 20 277 

412. TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION OF THE MOSCOW 
SOVIET FOOD DEPARTMENT. August 23 277 

413. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. August 26 278 

414. TELEGRAM TO N. OSINSKY. August 26 278 

415. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. August 26 or 27 278 

416. TELEGRAM TO M. M. LASHEVICH. August 28 279 

417. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. August 30 279 

418. RADIO-TELEGRAM TO THE TASHKENT EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. August 30 280 

419. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY AND I. T. SMILGA. Summer ... 280 

420. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. September 1 281 

421. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY, L. P. SEREBRYAKOV, 

M. M. LASHEVICH. September 6 281 

422. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE BOARDS AND PEOPLE'S COM- 
MISSARS OF ALL THE COMMISSARIATS. September 6 . . . 282 



CONTENTS 23 



423. MARKINGS ON THE REPORT OF K. F. MARTINOVICH AND 
A NOTE TO L. D. TROTSKY, F. E. DZERZHINSKY AND THE 
CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF THE R.C.P.(B.). September 12. . 282 

424. TO J. V. STALIN AND M. F. VLADIMIRSKY. September 12 . 283 

425. TO MAXIM GORKY. September 15 283 

426. TO L. D. TROTSKY, L. P. SEREBRYAKOV, M. M. LASHE- 
VICH. September 16 286 

427. TO MAXIM GORKY. September, not earlier than 26 . . . 286 

428. TO THE DEPUTY CHAIRMAN OF THE SUPREME ECONOM- 
IC COUNCIL. September 30 287 

429. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. September 287 

430. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. October 2 288 

431. TO I. T. SMILGA. October 4 288 

432. TELEGRAM TO THE ORENBURG GUBERNIA COMMITTEE 
OF THE R.C.P.(B.) AND GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. October 8 289 

433. TO THE COMRADES OF THE PETROGRAD GUBERNIA 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. October 10 289 

434. REMARKS ON A LETTER FROM G. V. CHICHERIN. Octo- 
ber 12 290 

435. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV AND M. V. FRUNZE. 
October 13 291 

436. TO THE DUTCH COMMUNISTS. October 14 291 

437. TO V. A. AVANESOV, E. M. SKLYANSKY, M. I. ROGOV, 

F. F. SYROMOLOTOV, V. P. MILYUTIN. October 15 ... . 292 

438. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY, N. A. SEMASHKO AND L. B. KA- 
MENEV. October 15 293 

439. TELEGRAM TO G. N. KAMINSKY. October 16 293 

440. TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 17 294 

441. INSTRUCTION ON I. N. SMIRNOV'S TELEGRAM. October 17 295 

442. TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. October 18 295 

443. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 18 296 

444. TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG. October 19 296 

445. TELEGRAM TO A. D. NAGLOVSKY. October 19 297 

446. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV. 
October 20 297 

447. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. October 21 298 

448. TELEGRAM TO V. M. GITTIS AND A. I. POTYAEV. 
October 21 298 

449. TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 22 299 



24 



CONTENTS 



450. TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 22 300 

451. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). October 22 300 

452. TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE OREL EXECU- 
TIVE COMMITTEE. October 22 301 

453. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV. 
October 24 301 

454. TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL OF THE 
SOUTHERN FRONT. October 25 302 

455. TELEGRAM TO K. A. PETERSON. October 25 303 

456. TELEGRAM TO THE PUGACHEV UYEZD FOOD CONFER- 
ENCE. October 26 303 

457. TO ALL SOVIET INSTITUTIONS AND MILITARY AUTHOR- 
ITIES. October 27 303 

458. TO THEODORE ROTHSTEIN. October 27 304 

459. TO N. A. SEMASHKO. October 27 304 

460. TO V. A. KUGUSHEV. October 28 305 

461. TELEGRAM TO D. N. AVROV, J. KH. PETERS, V. G. GRO- 
MAN. October 28 305 

462. TO Z. P. SOLOVYOV. November 1 306 

463. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV. 
November 1 307 

464. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. November 1 307 

465. TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG. November 1 308 

466. TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. November 2 308 

467. TO L. D. TROTSKY. November, not later than 6 . . . . 309 

468. TELEGRAM TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV. November 11 ... . 309 

469. TO THE CHIEF PEAT COMMITTEE. November 11 310 

470. TO YEVGENIA POPOVA. November 20 310 

471. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE 3rd ARMY, THE PERM GUBERNIA COMMISSAR 
FOR FOOD, THE COMMISSAR OF THE PERM RAILWAY, 
AND THE EKATERINBURG GUBERNIA COMMISSAR FOR 
FOOD. November 20 311 

472. TO A. S. YENUKIDZE. November 21 311 

473. TELEGRAM TO B. S. WEISSBROT. November 25 ... . 312 

474. TO N. A. SEMASHKO. November 27 312 

475. TO V. P. MILYUTIN. November 27 313 



CONTENTS 25 



476. TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE SEVENTH CONGRESS OF 
SOVIETS. December, not earlier than 5 and not later than 9 314 

477. TO YELENA STASOVA. December, after 9 314 

478. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
December 10 314 

479. TELEGRAM TO SH. Z. ELIAVA, J. E. RUDZUTAK, V. V. 
KUIBYSHEV. December 11 315 

480. UNDERLININGS ON A TELEGRAM FROM A. K. PAIKES 
AND A NOTE TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). December, not earlier than 11 and not later 
than 16 315 

481. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. December 15 316 

482. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. December 15 316 

483. TO L. B. KRASIN. December 17 317 

484. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 

December, not later than 18 317 

485. TO SH. Z. ELIAVA. December 19 318 

486. TELEGRAM TO RYAZAN. December 21 319 

487. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
December 22 320 

488. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. December 23 321 

489. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. December, not earlier than 25 321 

490. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. December 26 322 

491. TELEGRAM TO T. V. SAPRONOV. December 26 322 

492. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. December 27 323 

493. TO THE CENTRAL COLLEGIUM OF AGITATIONAL CEN- 
TRES. December 30 323 

1920 

494. TO SOPHIA BRICHKINA. Early in January 324 

495. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. January 2 324 

496. TO THE PODOLSK UYEZD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
January 2 325 

497. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. January 4 325 

498. TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. January 4 327 

499. TO A. I. SVIDERSKY. January 5 327 

500. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). January, not earlier than 5 and not later 
than 23 328 



26 



CONTENTS 



501. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE 3rd ARMY. January 12 328 

502. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. January 12 329 

503. TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE C.P.C. January 12 329 

504. UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION ON S. I. SYRTSOV'S 
TELEGRAM. January, not earlier than 13 and not later 
than 15 330 

505. TO THE CHIEF COAL COMMITTEE. January 14 330 

506. TO M. N. POKROVSKY. January 15 331 

507. TO THE CHIEF OIL COMMITTEE OF THE SUPREME ECO- 
NOMIC COUNCIL. January 15 331 

508. TELEGRAM TO K. G. MYASKOV. January 15 332 

509. POSTSCRIPT TO L. D. TROTSKY'S TELEGRAM. Janu- 
ary 17 332 

510. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. January 18 333 

511. TO L. B. KAMENEV. January 20 333 

512. TELEGRAM TO H. Y. YUMAGULOV. January, after 20 . . . 333 

513. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE 5th ARMY. January 21 334 

514. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. January, not later than 23 . . 335 

515. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE 1st LABOUR ARMY. January 23 336 

516. TO THE RUSSIAN TELEGRAPH AGENCY. January 27 . . . 337 

517. TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. End of January 337 

518. TO TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI-NOVGO- 
ROD GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. February 5 . . . 338 

519. TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI-NOV- 
GOROD CHEKA. February 5 338 

520. TELEGRAM TO S. T. KOVYLKIN. February 7 339 

521. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE LABOUR ARMY. February 10 339 

522. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. February 10 340 

523. TO S. P. SEREDA AND A. D. TSYURUPA. February 14 . . . 340 

524. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. 
February 17 341 

525. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. February 19 342 

526. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU, 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). February 19 342 

527. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. February 20 343 



CONTENTS 27 

528. TELEGRAM TO D. Z. MANUILSKY. February 22 343 

529. TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. February 23 344 

530. INSTRUCTION ON ZALYGIN'S TELEGRAM. February, not 
earlier than 24 344 

531. TELEGRAM TO THE SAMARA AND SARATOV GUBERNIA 
PARTY COMMITTEES AND GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEES. February 25 345 

532. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF THE PEOPLE'S 
COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD. February 25 346 

533. TO V. N. LOBOVA, A. Y. MINKIN, Y. M. YAROSLAVSKY. 
February 26 346 

534. TELEGRAM TO F. F. RASKOLNIKOV. February 27 ... . 347 

535. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF THE FOOD COMMIS- 
SARIAT. February 27 348 

536. TO K. A. ALFEROV. February 27 348 

537. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. February 28 349 

538. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. February 28 349 

539. TO L. B. KAMENEV. End of February-beginning of March 350 

540. TO L. B. KRASIN. Not earlier than March 1 350 

541. FOR LANSBURY. March 2 351 

542. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. 
March 3 351 

543. TELEGRAM TO N. N. KUZMIN. March 5 352 

544. TO S. Y. CHUTSKAYEV. March 5 352 

545. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. March 7 353 

546. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. March, not earlier than 

8 and not later than 20 354 

547. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. March 9 354 

548. TELEGRAM TO A. LOMOV. March 9 355 

549. INSTRUCTION TO PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIATS. March 10 . 355 

550. TO THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
March 11 356 

551. TELEGRAM TO I. S. UNSCHLICHT. March 11 356 

552. TELEGRAM TO F. F. RASKOLNIKOV AND S. M. KIROV. 
March 14 357 

553. TELEGRAM TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE ALL-UKRAINE 
CONFERENCE OF BOROTBISTS. March 16 357 

554. TO L. B. KRASIN. March 16 358 



28 



CONTENTS 



555. TO L. B. KRASIN. March, after 16 358 

556. TO AN UNIDENTIFIED ADDRESSEE. After March 16 . . . 358 

557. TELEGRAM TO MAXIM GORKY. March 19 359 

558. TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG. March 20 359 

559. TO KARL RADEK. March, not earlier than 23 360 

560. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO J. V. STALIN. March 24 ... . 360 

561. TELEGRAM TO A. Y. SHUMSKY. March 24 361 

562. TO THE ALL-RUSSIA CENTRAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
March 24 361 

563. NOTE TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) WITH THE DRAFT OF A TELE- 
GRAM TO SH. Z. ELIAVA AND J. E. RUDZUTAK. March 24 362 

564. TO A. I. SVIDERSKY. March, not earlier than 24 . . . 362 

565. THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
March 26 363 

566. TO A. I. RYKOV. March 28 363 

567. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. Not later than March 364 

568. TO YELENA STASOVA. Not later than March 365 

569. TO A. D. TSYURUPA. Not later than March 365 

570. TO A. V. LUNACHARSKY. March 366 

571. TO I. I. KHODOROVSKY. April 6 366 

572. TELEGRAM TO THE SAMARA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE. April 6 366 

573. TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. April 15 367 

574. TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. April 16 368 

575. TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. April 16 368 

576. UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION ON A. V. LUNA- 
CHARSKY'S LETTER. April 17 369 

577. TELEGRAMS TO G. L. PYATAKOV. April 20 369 

1 369 

2 370 

578. TO THE PETROGRAD SOVIET. April 22 370 

579. INSTRUCTION ON L. B. KRASIN'S NOTE. April, prior to 28 371 

580. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. Early in May 371 

581. TO N. A. SEMASHKO. May 3 372 

582. TELEGRAM TO F. Y. KON. May 4 372 

583. TO L. D. TROTSKY. May 4 373 



CONTENTS 29 



584. TO THE SECRETARIAT OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). May, 
after 5 373 

585. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). May 7 374 

586. TO BASIN. May 7 374 

587. TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. May, not earlier 
than 7 and not later than 12 374 

588. TELEGRAM TO L. B. KRASIN. May 11 375 

589. TO A. Y. BADAYEV. May 16 375 

590. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. May 25 376 

591. RADIO-TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. May 25 376 

592. TO ALL PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. May 26 377 

593. TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. May 27 377 

594. INSTRUCTION ON THE TELEGRAM FROM THE REVOLU- 
TIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL OF THE CAUCASIAN 
FRONT. May, not earlier than 27 378 

595. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. May 30 378 

596. TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI-NOV- 
GOROD GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. May 31 or 
June 1 379 

597. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. June 2 379 

598. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. June 2 380 

599. INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY. June 2 380 

600. TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. June 3 381 

601. TO L. D. TROTSKY. June 3 381 

602. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. June 4 382 

603. TO V. V. VOROVSKY AND V. P. MILYUTIN. June 4. . . . 382 

604. TO L. D. TROTSKY. June 4 383 

1 383 

2 383 

605. EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH K. A. ALFEROV. June 4 . . . 383 

606. TO S. I. BOTIN. June 4 384 

607. TO V. A. OBUKH. June 5 384 

608. TELEGRAM TO THE IRKUTSK GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE OR GUBERNIA REVOLUTIONARY COMMIT- 
TEE. June 10 385 

609. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. June 11 386 

610. TO D. I. LESHCHENKO. June 12 386 



30 



CONTENTS 



611. TO THE FUEL DEPARTMENT OF THE MOSCOW SOVIET. 
June 16 387 

612. TO A. M. HELLER. June 18 387 

613. TO THE WARDEN OF THE 2nd HOUSE OF SOVIETS. 
June 19 388 

614. MARKINGS ON P. V. BUKHARTSEV'S TELEGRAM CONCERN- 
ING THE AGREEMENT WITH THE AMERICAN CORPO- 
RATION, AND AN INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY. 
June 19 389 

615. TO A. N. MEREZHIN. Between June 21 and July 26 . . . 390 

616. TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR AGRICULTURE 
AND THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD. June 22 390 

617. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO THE PODOLSK UYEZD EXE- 
CUTIVE COMMITTEE, MOSCOW GUBERNIA. June 22 . . . 391 

618. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. June 24 391 

619. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. June 25 392 

620. TO SIBERIAN SOVIET INSTITUTIONS. June 26 393 

621. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. June 28 393 

622. TELEGRAM TO A. Y. BADAYEV AND AN INSTRUCTION TO 

D. I. KURSKY. June 29 393 

623. TO A. M. NIKOLAYEV. June 29 394 

624. TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE MOSCOW SOVIET. June 29 . . 395 

625. TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. June 29 or 30 395 

626. INSTRUCTION ON I. N. SMIRNOV'S LETTER. Between 
July 3 and 13 396 

627. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. July 4 397 

628. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. July, prior to 6 397 

1 397 

2 398 

3 398 

629. TO G . Y. ZINOVIEV. July 7 398 

630. TO A. M. NIKOLAYEV. July, not earlier than 7 . . . . 399 

631. TO M. M. GRUZENBERG. July 8 399 

632. TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR HEALTH. July 8 . 400 

633. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). July 9 401 

634. TO L. B. KAMENEV AND G. V. CHICHERIN. July 10 . . . 401 

635. UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION ON I. N. SMIRNOV'S 
TELEGRAM. July 11 402 



CONTENTS 31 

636. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. Between July 11 and 15 402 

637. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. July 12 or 13 403 

638. TO THEODORE ROTHSTEIN. July 15 403 

639. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
July 15 404 

640. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO L. B. KAMENEV. July 17 ... . 404 

641. TO THE POLISH BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
July 28 406 

642. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL OF LABOUR AND DE- 
FENCE. End of July 406 

643. TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. August 2 408 

644. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. August 3 408 

645. TO I. T. SMILGA AND M. N. TUKHACHEVSKY. August 3. . 409 

646. TO L. B. KAMENEV. August, not later than 5 409 

647. TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. August 7 410 

648. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA, F. E. DZERZHINSKY AND 

J. MARCHLEWSKI. August 9 410 

649. TO THE PETROGRAD SOVIET. August 10 411 

650. TO TELEGRAM TO A. G. BELOBORODOV. August 10 . . . 411 

651. TELEGRAM TO K. KH. DANISHEVSKY. August 11 ... . 412 

652. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. August 11 412 

653. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. August 11 413 

654. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
August, not earlier than 11 413 

655. TO D. I. KURSKY. August, not later than 12 414 

656. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. August 12 414 

657. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. August 12 414 

658. TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. August 13 415 

659. LETTER TO G. V. CHICHERIN AND A TELEGRAM TO L. B. 
KAMENEV. August 14 415 

660. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. August, not earlier than 14 . . . 416 

661. TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF HEALTH RESORTS AND 
SANATORIA OF THE CAUCASUS. August 17 417 

662. TELEGRAM TO K. KH. DANISHEVSKY. August 17 ... . 417 

663. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA. August 18 417 

664. TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA. August 19 418 



32 CONTENTS 

665. TELEGRAM TO KARL RADEK. August 19 418 

666. TELEGRAM TO V. P. ZATONSKY. August 19 419 

667. TO M. N. POKROVSKY. August, not later than 20 . . . 419 

668. TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. August 20 420 

669. TELEGRAM TO KARL RADEK, F. E. DZERZHINSKY AND 
ALL MEMBERS OF THE POLISH CENTRAL COMMITTEE. 
August 20 420 

670. TELEGRAM TO L. B. KAMENEV AND A NOTE TO G. V. CHI- 
CHERIN. August 20 421 

671. NOTE TO THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
WITH DRAFT OF A TELEGRAM TO V. S. MICKIEWICZ- 
KAPSUKAS. August 20 421 

672. TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. August 20 422 

673. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. August, prior to 21 .... 423 

674. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
August 24 423 

675. TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. August, prior to 27 423 

676. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
August 27 424 

677. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. August 27 424 

678. TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. August, not earlier than 28 . . 425 

679. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
August 31 425 

680. TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. September 2 . . . . 426 

681. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. September 2 426 

682. INSTRUCTION ON NADEZHDA NIKULINA'S LETTER. 
September, not earlier than 3 427 

683. TELEGRAM TO THE PODOLSK UYEZD FOOD COMMITTEE. 
September 6 427 

684. LYDIA FOTIEVA. September 6 428 

685. TO L. D. TROTSKY. September 8 428 

686. TO L. D. TROTSKY. September 9 429 

687. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO A. I. RYKOV AND A. M. LE- 
ZHAVA. September 10 429 

688. TO I. G. RUDAKOV. September 10 430 

689. TELEGRAM TO V. Y. CHUBAR AND V. N. KSANDROV. 
September 13 or 14 431 

690. TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUN- 
CIL OF THE CAUCASIAN FRONT. September 13 or 14 . . . 431 



CONTENTS 33 

691. TO V. A. AVANESOV. September 14 432 

692. TO M. I. KALININ. September 16 432 

693. TO A. M. LEZHAVA. September 16 433 

694. TO A. M. LEZHAVA. September 20 433 

695. MARKINGS ON S. S. KAMENEV'S REPORT AND A NOTE TO 

G. V. CHICHERIN. September 23 434 

696. TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE. September 23 434 

697. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. September, not earlier than 24 . . 435 

698. TO S. I. GILLERSON. September 25 435 

699. TO N. A. SEMASHKO. September 25 436 

700. TO THE SIBERIAN REVOLUTIONARY COMMITTEE. Sep- 
tember 26 436 

701. TO NOTE TO G. M. KRZHIZHANOVSKY AND MARKINGS ON 
BULLETIN No. 5 OF THE STATE COMMISSION FOR THE 
ELECTRIFICATION OF RUSSIA. September 26 437 

702. TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV. September 27 438 

703. NOTE TO THE SECRETARY. September, not earlier than 28 439 

704. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. September, not later than 29 . . 439 

705. TO N. I. BUKHARIN. Between September and December . . 439 

706. TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 1 440 

707. TO V. M. SVERDLOV. October 1 440 

708. TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 2 441 

709. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
October 3 441 

710. TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV. October 4 442 

711. TO A. I. RYKOV. October 6 442 

712. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. October 6 443 

713. TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
October 8 443 

714. TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. October 10 444 

715. TO N. I. BUKHARIN. October 11 445 

716. TO A. M. HELLER. Between October 11 and November 4 . 445 

717. TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. October 12 446 

718. PROPOSAL TO THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) ON THE SITUATION IN ARMENIA. October 12 . . 446 

719. TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. After October 12 446 



34 



CONTENTS 



720. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.). October 13 447 

721. TO G. M. KRZHIZHANOVSKY. October 14 447 

722. TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE OF 
THE R.C.P.(B.). October 15 448 

723. TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. October 15 448 

724. TO THE STAFF OF THE CEMENT WORKS AT SHCHU- 
ROVO STATION. October 16 449 

725. TO THE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING DEPARTMENT 

OF THE SUPREME ECONOMIC COUNCIL. October 16 . . . 449 

726. TO S. P. SEREDA. October 19 450 

727. TO V. S. KORNEV. October 19 450 

728. TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. October, after 19 451 

729. TO A. M. LEZHAVA AND M. N. POKROVSKY. October 21 . 451 

730. TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV. October 21 452 

731. TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS. 
October 21 453 

732. TO THE STATE PUBLISHERS. October 21 453 

733. TO G. V. CHICHERIN. October 25 454 

734. TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO A. M. LEZHAVA, F. F. SYROMO- 
LOTOV AND S. M. FRANKFURT. October 27 454 

735. TO THE VLADIMIR GUBERNIA PARTY COMMITTEE. Octo- 
ber 27 455 

736. TO THE CONTROL COMMISSION OF THE R.C.P.(B.). 
October 27 455 

737. TO A. I. RYKOV AND I. I. RADCHENKO. October 28 . . . 456 

738. TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. October 28 459 

739. TO P. I. POPOV. October 30 459 

740. TO S. I. BOTIN. October 460 

741. INSTRUCTION ON N. A. SEMASHKO'S TELEPHONE MES- 
SAGE. November 2 460 

742. TO A. Z. GOLTSMAN. November 3 461 

Notes 463 

Name Index 563 



35 



PREFACE 

Volume 44 contains letters, telegrams, notes and other 
documents written or dictated in the period from October 
1917 to November 1920; it supplements the works by Lenin 
included in volumes 26-31 of this edition. 

The documents relating to this period demonstrate 
Lenin's many-sided activity in building up the new, Soviet 
machinery of state and ensuring its smooth running, guid- 
ing economic and cultural development, and organising 
the defence of the country. 

In these documents Lenin gives directives for defeating 
counter-revolutionary revolts, ensuring revolutionary order, 
and defending the world's first proletarian dictatorship. 
They show Lenin as the organiser and inspirer of the vic- 
tories over the interventionists and whiteguards. Lenin's 
instruction to the Red Guard Staff, his letters to the Petro- 
grad Committee of the R.S.D.L.P.(B.), to the Supreme 
Military Council, to the People's Commissariat for 
Naval Affairs, to G. V. Chicherin and M. M. Litvinov, to 
E. M. Sklyansky, the telegrams to the Revolutionary Military 
Councils of the Eastern and Southern fronts, to the army com- 
manders, to S. I. Gusev, I. T. Smilga, M. M. Lashevich and 
G. Y. Sokolnikov, and many other documents, are exam- 
ples of Lenin's activity in leading the struggle against 
foreign and domestic counter-revolution and guiding the 
military activities on the fronts of the Civil War. 

Volume 44 publishes a letter of Lenin's to the Central 
Committee of the R.C.P.(B.) dated June 17, 1919, which, 
like a number of other documents, shows that he regarded 
the Central Committee of the Party as the body for collec- 
tive leadership of the country's defence. Lenin set aside 
Trotsky's objections to the Central Committee's decision to 
strengthen the General Headquarters, and wrote that this de- 



36 



PREFACE 



cision contained "what Trotsky overlooked, namely, that the 
majority of the C.C. is convinced that ... all is not well at 
Headquarters, and in seeking a serious improvement, in 
seeking ways for a radical change it has taken a definite 
step" (p. 255 of this volume). 

In response to Lenin's call, many of the country's in- 
dustrial cities sent their best Communists and non-Party 
workers to the decisive fronts of the Civil War. Lenin 
constantly followed the progress of mobilisation and the 
training of reserves for the Red Army. In a letter to the 
Revolutionary Military Council of the Southern Front re- 
commending a group of Ivanovo-Voznesensk Communists 
Lenin requested that they should be allocated correctly and 
carefully. "I particularly ask to be informed of the receipt 
of this letter," he wrote, "and of where and how the com- 
rades are assigned" (p. 302). 

Situated as it was in a hostile capitalist encirclement, 
the Soviet Republic experienced extreme difficulties. The 
documents in this volume contain much material on Lenin's 
leadership of the foreign policy of the Soviet state and 
show his exceptional perspicacity and profound understand- 
ing of the alignment of forces in the international arena. 
It was only thanks to the tremendous efforts of Lenin, in a 
stubborn struggle of the Party against Trotsky and the opposi- 
tional group of "Left Communists" that the peace treaty with 
Germany was signed at Brest-Litovsk on March 3, 1918. 
Its conclusion was a striking example of the wisdom and 
flexibility of Lenin's tactics, and his ability to frame the 
solely correct policy in an extremely complicated situation. 
The signing of the Brest peace and the struggle against 
the "Left Communists" are dealt with in the letter to Major- 
General S. I. Odintsov on November 15 (28), 1917, the 
note to Karl Radek on January 14 (27), 1918, the radio- 
telegram to the peace delegation on February 25, 1918, 
the telegram to Irkutsk on February 27, 1918, and other 
documents. 

The Soviet Government headed by Lenin consistently 
pursued a policy of peace advocated peaceful coexistence 
of states with different social systems. When the imperial- 
ists of the Entente began their anti-Soviet armed interven- 
tion, the Soviet state repeatedly addressed proposals for 



PREFACE 



37 



peace to the governments of the United States, Great Britain 
and France. In the letter to G. V. Chicherin and L. M. Ka- 
rakhan on October 10, 1918, Lenin wrote: "Regarding the 
Note to Wilson, I think it should be sent. Write it in detail, 
politely, but caustically, saying: in any case we con- 
sider it our duty to propose peace — even to governments of 
capitalists and multimillionaires — in order to try to stop the 
bloodshed and to open the eyes of the peoples" (p. 152). 
The Soviet Government's readiness to enter into peace 
negotiations with the leaders of the Entente Powers is 
also stressed in Lenin's letter of May 6, 1919, to Chicherin 
and Litvinov. Letters to Krasin, Litvinov, Chicherin, 
and others are devoted to the establishment of trade 
and economic relations with the capitalist countries. 
Among them are letters on the negotiations with W. B. Van- 
derlip, a representative of American business circles (see 
pp. 423, 442). In one of the letters, Lenin wrote: "trade 
agreements with the Soviet Republics are more advan- 
tageous to the British bourgeoisie than unprofitable and 
even ruinous attempts to crush them" (pp. 404-05). 

Published in this volume is a considerable number of 
documents showing Lenin's activity in the most diverse fields 
of the socialist economy: putting the work of nationalised 
enterprises on a proper footing, organising financial affairs, 
the utilisation of the co-operative movement for supplying 
the population, the development of agriculture, the organi- 
sation of communes and artels. 

The volume contains Lenin's letters elaborating and 
clarifying the basic principles of the single economic plan 
endorsed by the Ninth Congress of the R.C.P.(B.). A num- 
ber of letters are devoted to propaganda for the electrifi- 
cation of the country. Lenin was interested in the coal 
deposits of Bryansk District, the oil of Ukhta, Berchogur 
and Cheleken, the exploitation of shales, the use of peat 
as a basis for electrification. He attached very great signifi- 
cance to the development of engineering, to the speediest 
introduction of up-to-date achievements in the national 
economy, to making wide use of scientists and experts. 
There are documents showing Lenin's interest in the 
Nizhni-Novgorod Radio Laboratory, which was in fact one 
of the first scientific research institutes. In the note to N. P. 



38 



PREFACE 



Gorbunov on October 21, 1918, Lenin wrote: "I earnestly 
request you to speed up as much as possible the Science 
and Technology Department's findings in regard to the 
Radio Laboratory. It is extremely urgent. Drop me a line 
when its findings are ready" (p. 156). The telegram 
to the Porokhovo District Soviet on July 2, 1919, the letters 
to N. A. Semashko on May 3, 1920, and to A. I. Rykov and 
I. I. Radchenko on October 28, 1920, and other letters, are 
indicative of Lenin's attitude to inventions and inventors. 

Lenin pointed out that scientists must play a leading 
part in applying scientific knowledge to the national econo- 
my and making use of scientific achievements. The present 
volume publishes Lenin's letter to Gorky of September 15, 
1919, in which he said that the Soviet government 
highly valued scientists who had resolved to devote their 
knowledge and labour to the people. He wrote: "To the 
'intellectual forces' who want to bring science to the people 
(and not to act as servants of capital), we pay a salary 
above the average. That is a fact. We take care of them. 
That is a fact" (p. 285). At the same time he explained 
to Gorky that the Soviet Government was compelled to 
take severe measures against those who were involved in 
counter-revolutionary conspiracies and revolts, which threat- 
ened the lives of tens of thousands of workers and peasants. 

Lenin repeatedly pointed to the need to put science and 
ideology at the service of the new socialist order. He sharp- 
ly criticised the views of the ideologists of Proletcult who 
oppugned the leading role of the Soviet state and the Party 
in cultural matters. Everything connected with raising the 
cultural level of the working people claimed Lenin's atten- 
tion: the abolition of illiteracy, questions concerning litera- 
ture, the quality of mass publications, the development of 
libraries, radio broadcasting, the cinema, etc. One of the 
main tasks of education during the first years of Soviet 
rule was the liquidation of illiteracy. "... The struggle 
against illiteracy is a task more important than any other," 
he wrote in August 1920 (p. 413). 

Lenin attached great importance to propaganda and 
agitation. On receiving a letter from a "group of students 
interested in communism", he wished them "most speedy 
success in your study of communism, mastery of it, and 



PREFACE 



39 



commencement of practical work in the ranks of the Rus- 
sian Communist Party" (pp. 147-48). Lenin devoted much 
attention to the realisation of his plan for "monumental 
propaganda", for decorating the streets of Moscow and 
Petrograd with revolutionary inscriptions on buildings and 
with monuments to outstanding leaders of the revolutionary 
movement and culture. 

The Party and government exerted tremendous efforts to 
rescue the country from the grip of economic chaos and 
famine. In the letter to A. G. Shlyapnikov on May 28, 1918, 
Lenin wrote: "The Central Committee has passed a decision 
to direct the maximum number of Party workers to the 
food front. For obviously we shall perish and ruin 
the whole revolution if we do not conquer famine in the 
next few months" (p. 95). The letter to the Commissariat 
for Food and to the Food Department of the Supreme Eco- 
nomic Council, the note to the secretary, the telegram to 
Kharkov and Moscow, the letter to V. A. Antonov-Ovseyen- 
ko and G. K. Orjonikidze, the telegram to S. V. Malyshev, 
the telegram to the Revolutionary Military Councils of the 
10th and 4th armies, the letter to the Agricultural Section 
of the Food Department of the Moscow Soviet, and the 
telegram to the Podolsk Uyezd Food Committee reflect 
Lenin's activities in the business of supplying food for the 
Red Army and the population of the industrial centres. 

"Petrograd and Moscow are without grain. Heroic meas- 
ures needed. Wire exact reply immediately," wrote Lenin 
to V. A. Radus-Zenkovich; Chairman of the Saratov 
Gubernia Executive Committee, on July 11, 1919 (p. 263). 
"At all costs provide all workers of the Urals, particularly 
the Ekaterinburg district, Kizel and other coal-mining 
districts, with full supplies of essential foodstuffs," was 
Lenin's instruction to the civil and military authorities of 
Perm and Ekaterinburg in November 1919 (p. 311). He 
gave special attention to supplies for children. Supporting 
the proposals for ensuring food for children, Lenin wrote to 
Tsyurupa "Perhaps something more could be done for the 
children? It should be" (p. 188). 

The letters show how Lenin's principles of Party and 
state leadership were worked out, and characterise his style 
of work. 



40 



PREFACE 



Lenin attached immense importance to collective leader- 
ship. As the documents in this volume show, on all impor- 
tant matters he consulted his colleagues and other leading 
workers and submitted these questions to the Central Com- 
mittee or the Council of People's Commissars for consider- 
ation and decision. "I cannot go against the will and 
decision of my Council colleagues," he emphasised in a 
letter to Maria Andreyeva (p. 69). At the same time Lenin 
considered it essential that collective leadership should be 
duly combined with the personal responsibility of each 
worker for the task entrusted to him. On August 26, 1918, 
he wrote to A. P. Smirnov: "I very much fear that you 
in Saratov are playing at collegiate methods at a time 
when the work demands energy and prompt action by res- 
ponsible executives..." (p. 142). Lenin severely criticised 
all manifestations of localism, anarchy, indiscipline, or the 
refusal of one or another staff member to submit to instruc- 
tions from higher organisations. He taught the executives 
of administrative and Party bodies to be business-like, 
quicker on the move in taking decisions, to be able to 
concentrate attention on the most important task and see 
each job through to the end. 

A number of documents show Lenin's efforts to strengthen 
revolutionary, socialist legality. In the note to the Commis- 
sariat for Justice on April 15, 1918, be stressed the need 
for codification, for publishing a Collection of Laws and 
Decrees of the Soviet Government, for expanding propa- 
ganda on matters of law among the population, and for 
drawing the mass of working people into the work of the 
People's Courts. He pointed to the need for a determined 
struggle against embezzlement of state property, profiteer- 
ing and hooliganism; he proposed severe measures of 
punishment for bribe-takers. Lenin demanded that all Soviet 
bodies and all the personnel of the state apparatus should 
strictly observe the laws in force in the Republic. He wrote 
that the mere suggestion to evade a decree should entail 
prosecution by the courts. Lenin was quick to react to any 
information signalising a violation of socialist legality, he 
issued directives for a deeper study of individual cases, 
and took vigorous steps to stop responsible workers abusing 
their official position. 



PREFACE 



41 



The Communist Party of Soviet Russia acted as a great 
patriotic and international force. Lenin closely followed 
the events in Hungary and endeavoured to hearten the 
Hungarian Communists, who were encountering great dif- 
ficulties. In a letter to Bela Kun, he wrote: "We are aware 
of Hungary's grave and dangerous situation and are doing 
all we can.... Hold on with all your might, victory will 
be ours" (p. 271). "The communist movement in all coun- 
tries is growing remarkably. The Soviet system has every- 
where become a practical slogan for the working masses. 
This is a step forward of tremendous world-historic signifi- 
cance." These were the words with which Lenin greeted 
the Dutch Communists in October 1919 (p. 291). He wrote 
to Raymond Robins on April 30, 1918: "I am sure the new 
democracy, that is, the proletarian democracy, is coming 
in all countries and will crush all obstacles and the impe- 
rialist-capitalist system..." (p. 82). 

All the documents given in Volume 44 are published 
in accordance with the Fifth (Russian) Edition of Lenin's 
Collected Works (volumes 50 and 51). 



Institute of Marxism-Leninism 
of the C.C., C.P.S.U. 



43 



1917 



INSTRUCTION TO THE RED GUARD STAFF 1 

Please take all steps for immediate execution. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 



Written on October 30 
(November 12), 1917 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO THE PETROGRAD COMMITTEE 
OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) 

To the P.C. 

I earnestly request the Petrograd Committee immediately 
to pass a decision against conciliation and to put it before 
the C.C. 2 

Lenin 



Written on November 2 (15), 

First published in part 
in 1960 in the journal 
Voprosy Istorii KPSS No. 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50* 



1917 



Printed from the original 



* All references to the Fifth Edition of Lenin's Collected Works 
have in view the Russian edition. — Ed. 



44 



V. I. LENIN 



3 

TO Y. M. SVERDLOV 

Comrade Sverdlov 

The bearer has a mandate from the local Soviet. 
He wants to work in Petrograd. 
Makes an excellent impression. 

He wants "militant" work among the masses (as agitator, 
etc.) . 

I strongly advise you to give him an opportunity at once 
to prove his worth in work among the masses in Petrograd. 3 

Lenin 

Written not earlier than 
November 8 (21), 1917 

First published in 1957 Printed from the original 

in the journal 
Istorichesky Arkhiv No. 5 

4 

TO THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION 

FOR INFORMATION 
OF THE LABOUR PRESS OF AMERICA, 
FRANCE AND GREAT BRITAIN 4 

I am ready to reply to your questions if you give me an 
absolutely formal and precise guarantee, first, that you 
will inform the entire labour press, i.e., also the press 
organs of an internationalist trend (Heywood, the S.L.P. 
in America, Tom Mann and the British Socialist Party in 
Britain, Loriot and his friends in France, etc.), and sec- 
ondly, that my reply will be reproduced without any alter- 
ations, that is to say, you have the right not to publish 
my reply, but if you do publish it you have no right to 
change anything in my text. 

Who is the responsible representative of your "Interna- 
tional Association" here, in London, New York and Paris? 

Lenin 

Written in November 
prior to 10 (23), 1917 

First published on January 26, Printed from the original 
1960, in French (in facsimile) Translated from the 

and Rumanian in the newspaper French 
Scinteia No. 4740, Bucharest 

First published in Russian 
on January 27, 1960 
in the newspaper Pravda No. 27 



TO PETROGRAD COMMITTEE, R.S.D.L.P.(B.), NOVEMBER 25, 1917 45 



5 

TO MAJOR-GENERAL S. I. ODINTSOV 

You have proposed to me the organisation of a group of 
staff officers and generals who have a higher military edu- 
cation and who wish to work out the military and technical 
problems of an armistice that would permit Russia, without 
violation of her interests, to secure the suspension of hos- 
tilities. 

In view of the extreme urgency of this matter, I would 
earnestly request you to get your group together at once, 
tomorrow morning, and to send me tomorrow evening at 
least a brief outline of the main problems, points and pro- 
visions of an armistice agreement (demarcation of the 
front line, stipulation that no troops be moved to other 
fronts, control measures, etc., etc.), and also to indicate 
the person or persons who would be fully competent to 
take part directly in the negotiations. 

Please send me a reply by messenger. 

Written on November 15 (28), 1917 

First published in 1959 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI of the telegraph tape 



6 

TO THE PETROGRAD COMMITTEE 
OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) 

To the P.C. 

Can one of the comrades write and tell me whether a 
resolution on courts of law was adopted yesterday in the 
Petrograd Soviet and what has been done practically? 5 

Lenin 

Written on November 25 
(December 8), 1917 

First published in 1959 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI of the telegraph tape 



46 



V. I. LENIN 



7 



TELEGRAM TO THE ARMY IN THE FIELD 

Semennik, Chairman of the Committee of units 
not included in the divisions of the 21st Army Corps 
The Army in the Field 

Landed estates together with live and dead stock shall 
be handed over to the land committees. They must be 
strictly safeguarded as the property of the people. 



On the question of Hanecki, the narrow C.C. has passed 
a decision not to appoint him as representative in Stock- 
holm. 

That is to say, it rescinded the previous decision of the C.C. 

I propose that this decision be countermanded on the 
following grounds. 

What are the arguments against Hanecki? 

He is known since 1903; a member of the Polish C.C. 
who worked for many years as a C.C. member; we saw his 
work in Cracow, his trips to Russia, etc., we saw him at all 
congresses, etc., etc. 

The arguments are merely a campaign of bourgeois 
slanders, Zaslavsky's outcries. 

It would be quite unworthy of a workers' party to show 
such credulity to intellectualist scandal. Let someone prove 
anything bad about Hanecki first, before we remove 
him. 

"But Hanecki traded with Parvus," they "all" say. 



Lenin 



Written on November 26 
(December 9), 1917 

First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from the text 
of the telegraph tape 



8 

TO THE C.C. OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) 

The Hanecki affair 



TO THE C.C. OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.)- NOVEMBER 1917 47 



Hanecki earned his living as an employee in a commercial 
firm of which Parvus was a shareholder. That is what 
Hanecki told me. It has not been refuted. 

Is it forbidden to work in capitalist commercial under- 
takings? Where? By what decision of the Party? 

Are there no people among us who work in commercial 
firms of Russian, British and other capitalists? 

Or is it permissible to be a technician, a manager or an 
employee of Russian capitalists, but not of German, even 
when living in a neutral country?? And is that to be the 
decision of an "internationalist" party?? 

Let it decide frankly, let it pass a general resolution, 
let it give grounds for the step taken against Ha- 
necki. 

When Bukharin wanted to go and work in Parvus' s busi- 
ness as a writer, we dissuaded him, for after all it is not 
a commercial firm. But while we dissuaded him, we did 
not denounce the Mensheviks 6 in Parvus's employ. We did 
not denounce Zurabov and a host of others, we did not 
accuse them. 

Who accused them, and where? 

Why is it that up to now we have not questioned the 
Mensheviks and others who lived in Copenhagen and knew 
of Hanecki's commercial occupation and who did not con- 
demn him? We could and should have done that. 

Not a single fact against Hanecki has been established, 
no ban has been passed on being employed in capitalist 
commercial firms of all countries, no check has been made 
on the rumours and slanders of notorious slanderers like 
Zaslavsky — yet the man is to be "removed"?? There is 
nothing here but "fear" of the slanders of irresponsible 
slanderers. 

It is unworthy of a working-class party to be so credu- 
lous of scandal. If the comrades who succumb to scandal 
are "perturbed", "worried", why shouldn't they exert them- 
selves a little? Isn't it better to take some pains to find 
the truth than to repeat scandal? In Petrograd itself it is 
possible (if a perturbed comrade wants to go to same trou- 
ble and not decide things offhand) to find witnesses from 
Copenhagen, and in Moscow too. Why don't the anonymous 
accusers of Hanecki in the ranks of our Party do that?? 



48 



V. I. LENIN 



Such treatment of an absent comrade, who has worked 
for more than ten years, is the height of injustice. 

Written in November, not later 
than 29 (December 12), 1917 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

9 

TELEGRAM TO THE COMMITTEE FOR ELECTIONS 
TO THE CONSTITUENT ASSEMBLY 7 

Pskov 

I remain a deputy of the Baltic Fleet and request you 
to replace me by the next candidate on the Bolshevik list.* 

Ulyanov (Lenin) 

Written on November 30 
(December 13), 1917 

First published in 1958 Printed from the text 

in the journal of the telegraph form 

Sovetsky Moryak No. 5 

10 

TO THE PETROGRAD COMMITTEE 
OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) 

8. XII. 1917 

To the P.C. 

Please send not less than 100 persons, absolutely reliable 
Party members, to room No. 75, second floor — the Com- 
mittee to Combat Looting. (For performance of commissar 
duties.) 8 

The matter is extremely important. The Party is re- 
sponsible. Approach the districts and factories. 

Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on December 8 (21), 1917 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



* Similarly worded telegrams were sent to Petrograd and Mos- 
cow. — Ed. 



TO BLAGONRAVOV AND BONCH-BRUYEVICH. DECEMBER 8, 1917 49 



11 

TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 

Comrade Antonov, who is leaving for Moscow and from 
there for the south to conduct military operations against 
Kaledin, 9 is obliged every day, by direct line (personally 
or through an aide), to inform the Council of People's 
Commissars whom precisely he, or other military authori- 
ties, appoints as responsible persons for directing particu- 
lar operations, especially as regards movement and mus- 
tering of troops and command. 

Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on December 8 (21), 1917 

First published in 1959 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten text 



12 

TO G. I. BLAGONRAVOV 
AND V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 

8. XII. 1917 

Comrades Blagonravov and Bonch-Bruyevich 

The arrests which have to be carried out on the orders 
of Comrade Peters are of exceptionally great importance 
and must be executed with great energy.* Special measures 
must be taken to prevent destruction of papers, flight, 
concealment of documents, etc. 

Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on December 8 (21), 1917 

First published in part in 1960 
in Voprosy Istorii KPSS No. 6 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



Printed from the original 



* This refers to the arrest of counter-revolutionaries. — Ed. 



50 



V. I. LENIN 



13 

TELEGRAM TO V. V. VOROVSKY 

Vorovsky 
Stockholm 

Urgently find and send here three highly skilled account- 
ants to work on reform of the banks. Knowledge of Rus- 
sian is not essential. Fix their remuneration yourself in 
accordance with local conditions. 

Lenin 

Written in December 
after 8 (21), 1917 

First published on November 6-7, Printed from the text 

1927, in the newspaper Izvestia of the telegraph form 

No. 256 



14 

TO V. V. OBOLENSKY 

18. XII. 1917 

Comrade Obolensky, 

I recommend to you the bearer, Comrade Solovyov (tele- 
phone 265-24), an expert on the oil industry and the 
author of a plan for nationalisation. He should be used! 

V. Ulyanov 

I gave his memorandum (on the oil industry) to Shlyap- 
nikov. There is a copy for you too (Shlyapnikov has it). 10 

Written on December 18 (31), 1917 

First published in part in 1958 Printed from the original 

in the book: O deyatelnosti 
V. I. Lenina v 1917-1922 (Activities 
of V. I. Lenin in 1917-1922), Moscow 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

15 

TO P. A. KOZMIN 

20. XII. 1917 

Comrade Kozmin, 

I was expecting you yesterday for a talk about the case 
of the delegates from the No. 2 Steel Plant at Kamenskaya 



TO CHARLES DUMAS. DECEMBER 21, 1917 



51 



stanitsa. They ask that financing should be stopped and 
the commission withdrawn, since they regard it as reaction- 
ary and parasitic. If we do not see each other this evening, 
please telephone me. 11 



Dear Citizen Charles Dumas, 

My wife and I recall with great pleasure the time we 
met you in Paris, rue Bonier. We are very grateful to you 
for the exchange of ideas and for the very accurate infor- 
mation on the socialist movement in France. 

I very much regret that personal relations between us 
became impossible after such profound political differences 
divided us. Throughout the war I fought against the 
"national defence" trend, I always stood for a split, being 
convinced that that tendency was ruining socialism com- 
pletely. 

It goes without saying that I am writing this letter not 
as a member of the government but as a private individual. 

Please accept our greetings, dear citizen, and best wishes 
from my wife and myself. 



Lenin 



Written on December 20, 1917 
(January 2, 1918) 

First published in November 
1927 in the journal Sovetskoye 
Mukomolye i Khlebopecheniye No. 8 



Printed from the original 



16 

TO CHARLES DUMAS 



21/XII— 1917 



Lenin 



Written on December 21, 1917 
(January 3, 1918) 

First published on March 6, 1959, 
in French in The Times Literary 
Supplement (London) No. 2975 



Printed from the text 
Translated from 
the French 



First published in Russian 
on April 14-20, 1963, in Nedelya, 
Sunday Supplement of Izvestia, 
No. 16 



52 



V. I. LENIN 



17 

TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 



The Council of People's Commissars is confident that 
Comrade Antonov will continue as before to act in close 
contact with the central Ukrainian Soviet authorities who 
were greeted by the Council of People's Commissars, and 
with the Commissar Extraordinary appointed by the 
C.P.C. 13 



Written on December 30, 1917 
(January 12, 1918) 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



53 



1918 



18 

TELEGRAM TO L. M. KARAKHAN* 

Karakhan 

Russian Peace Delegation 
Brest-Litovsk 

Copy to Supreme Commander-in-Chief Krylenko 

I received your telegram concerning the report from the 
members of the Revolutionary Committee of the 8th Army 
— Kuzmin and Reizon. 14 I am passing this telegram on 
to the Commander-in-Chief with my advice: not to give 
way to the provocation of the Kiev Rada, not to trust it, 
and to act in an armed, organised and most resolute way 
against the Rumanian counter-revolutionary command, 
against the Kaledinites and their accomplices in the Kiev 
Rada. 

Lenin 

Written on January 3 (16), 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, of the telegraph tape 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



19 

INSTRUCTION 

The soldier and sailor comrades on guard duty within 
the precincts of the Taurida Palace are instructed not to 
allow any violence towards the counter-revolutionary part 



Transmitted by direct line. — Ed. 



54 



V. I. LENIN 



of the Constituent Assembly and, while permitting all to 
freely leave the Taurida Palace, not to let anyone in with- 
out special orders. 15 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars* 

Written on the night 
of January 5 (18), 1918 

Published on January 12 (25), Printed from the original 

in the newspaper 
Russkiye Vedomosti No. 5 



20 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE 
TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR JUSTICE 

I have just received a report that last night sailors entered 
the Mariinskaya hospital and killed Shingaryov and Ko- 
koshkin. I order you immediately: first, to begin a rigo- 
rous investigation; secondly, to arrest the sailors guilty 
of this murder. 16 

Lenin 

Written on January 7 (20), 1918 

Published on January 8 (21), Printed from 

1918, in Pravda (evening edition) the typewritten copy 

No. 6 



21 

TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN 

7. I. 1918 

Comrade Mekhonoshin 

The bearer, Comrade Rahja, is an old Party functionary, 
personally known to me and absolutely trustworthy. It is 
extremely important to help him (for the Finnish proletar- 



* The document was signed also by M. S. Uritsky, Commissar 
of the All-Russia Committee for Elections to the Constituent Assem- 
bly and member of the Extraordinary Commission for the Defence 
of Petrograd. — Ed. 



TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD. JANUARY 13, 1918 



55 



iat) by supplying weapons: some 10,000 rifles with 
cartridges and 10 three-inch guns with shells. 
Please fulfil this without reducing the figures. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written on January 7 (20), 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

22 

INSTRUCTION TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 

Instruction 

Notify the sailors of the Guards Depot (taking signed 
statements from them that they have been so informed) 
that they are answerable for the lives of the arrested of- 
ficers and that they, the sailors, will be deprived of food 
rations, arrested and prosecuted. 

Take urgent measures: (1) for sending a well-armed guard 
to the building; (2) for recording as many as possible of 
the names of the Guards Depot sailors. 17 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written in January, not earlier 
than 8 (21), 1918 

First published in 1930 in the book: 
Vladimir Bonch-Bruyevich, 
Na boyevykh postakh Fevralskoi 
i Oktyabrskoi revolyutsii 
(At the Fighting Posts 
of the February and October 
Revolutions), Moscow 



23 



Printed from the original 



TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD AND THE FOOD 
DEPARTMENT OF THE SUPREME ECONOMIC 
COUNCIL 18 

13. I. 1918 

The bearers, Comrades Suvorov and Antropov, are dele- 
gates of the Regional Committee of the Urals Soviets. 



56 



V. I. LENIN 



It is necessary to authorise them to adopt the most revo- 
lutionary measures to ensure the movement to Petrograd 
of railway trucks with grain from Siberia. 

Lenin 

Written on January 13 (26), 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



24 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 

To be given to Schlichter and Nevsky with the request 
that they assist with the utmost energy these people, who 
make an excellent impression, for only such contingents 
(40-60 persons from the locality) are able to save us from 
famine. 

Lenin 

Written on January 13 (26), 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



25 

TELEGRAM TO KHARKOV AND MOSCOW 

Orjonikidze, People's Secretariat, Antonov's Staff, 
Kharkov 

Commander-in-Chief Muralov 
Presidium of the Soviet of Deputies 
Moscow 

We have received news of a traffic jam between Orel 
and Kursk preventing the passage of trains with coal and 
grain. Any hold-up threatens famine and stoppage of 
industry. We suspect sabotage by railwaymen in this 
locality for there have been several cases of sabotage there. 
We urgently ask you to take the most ruthless revo- 
lutionary measures. We ask you to send out a detachment 



TO ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO AND ORJONIKIDZE, JANUARY 15, 1918 57 



of absolutely reliable persons. Use all means to ensure the 
movement of trucks with grain to Petrograd, otherwise 
there is a threat of famine. Place several sailors or Red 
Guards on each of the locomotives. Remember that it 
depends on you to save Petrograd from famine. 



Dear Radek, 

Trotsky or Kamenev will inform you of my point of 
view. I fundamentally and radically disagree with you. 
You are falling into the trap which the imperialists of 
both groups are setting the Republic of Soviets. 19 



Lenin 



Written on January 13 (26), 1918 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the text 
in Gorbunov's handwriting 



26 

TO KARL RADEK 



14. I. 1918 



With best regards, 



Yours, 



Lenin 



Written on January 14 (27), 1918 

First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from the original 
Translated 
from the German 



27 



TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 
AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 



15. I. 1918 



Antonov and Sergo 
Kharkov 



For God's sake, take the most energetic and revolutionary 
measures to send grain, grain and more grain\\\ Otherwise 
Petrograd may perish. Special trains and detachments. 



58 



V. I. LENIN 



Grain collection and delivery. Have the trains convoyed. 
Report daily. 
For God's sake! 

Lenin 

Written on January 15 (28), 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

28 

TO N. I. PODVOISKY AND N. V. KRYLENKO* 

15. I. 1918 

Comrade Podvoisky and Comrade Krylenko 

I received the enclosed letter today from the Dutch 
comrade Luteraan, a member of the Left "Tribunist" 
Party. 20 I made his acquaintance in 1915 in Berne. 

Luteraan asks to be given money for his journey and to 
be enrolled in Russia's Red Guard. 

On grounds of principle I would request you to do what 
he asks. Perhaps he could be enrolled temporarily among 
the Letts or Estonians who speak German, until he has 
learnt Russian. 21 

Lenin 

Written on January 15 (28), 1918 

First published in part Printed from the original 

in 1957 in the book: 
Y. Yerykalov, Krasnaya Gvardia 

v borbe za vlast Sovetov 
(The Red Guard in the Struggle 
for Soviet Power), Moscow 
Published in full in 1965 in 
Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

29 

TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT 
FOR MILITARY AFFAIRS 

17. I. 1918 

Please issue to the Commissar of the Finlandskaya Rail- 
way 25,000 rifles and 30 machine-guns, required for the 



* Lenin made the following note on the document: "B. Luteraan. 
Oostenburgermiddenstraat 59 m , Amsterdam. Holland." — Ed. 



TO KULLERVO MANNER AND KARL VIIK. JANUARY 24, 1918 59 



protection of Russian soldiers in Finland against the 
atrocities of whiteguard bourgeois detachments. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on January 17 (30), 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



30 

TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 

Antonov 
Kharkov 

I congratulate you on your victory. 22 I shall immedi- 
ately transmit your demand to Moscow. Direct all efforts 
towards sending grain and more grain to Petrograd. 

Lenin 

Written on January 17 (30), 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV of the telegraph tape 



31 

TELEGRAM TO KULLERVO MANNER AND KARL VIIK 

Urgent. Governmental 

Prime Minister Manner 
and Karl Viik 
Helsingfors 

Radio transmissions in Swedish and telegrams on behalf 
of the unions of Swedish workers in Finland should be 
sent to Sweden as frequently and in as great detail as pos- 
sible in order to refute the extremely mendacious reports 
of the Swedish bourgeois press about the events in Fin- 



60 



V. I. LENIN 



land. 23 Please let me know whether you are taking all 
measures. 

Lenin 

Written on January 24 
(February 6, 1918) 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



32 

TELEGRAM TO ARTHUR HENDERSON 24 

The Russian Socialist Government regrets inability to 
participate in the Allied Socialist Conference as being 
contrary to the principles of Internationalism. We object 
to division of the working class according to Imperialist 
grouping. If British Labour agrees to Russian peace aims, 
which are already accepted by the Socialist parties of the 
Central Powers, such division is still more unwarranted. 

Written on January 24 
(February 6, 1918) 
Sent to London 

Published on February 14, Printed from 

1918, in English in the newspaper the newspaper text 

The Call No. 97 Written in English 

First published in Russian 
in 1965 in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



33 

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HEADQUARTERS 
OF THE SUPREME COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF* 

Use all methods available to you to cancel today's tele- 
gram on peace and general demobilisation of the armies 
on all fronts. By order of Lenin. 25 

Written on January 29 
(February 11, 1918) 

First published in 1964 
in the book: A. L. Fraiman, 
Revolyutsionnaya zashchita 
Petrograda v fevrale-marte 1918 
(The Revolutionary Defence 
of Petrograd in February-March 
1918), Moscow-Leningrad 



* Transmitted by direct line by Lenin's secretary.— Ed. 



Printed from the text 
of the telegraph tape 



TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. JANUARY 30, 1918 



61 



34 

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HEADQUARTERS 
OF THE SUPREME COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF* 

Notify all army commissars and Bonch-Bruyevich that 
all telegrams signed by Trotsky and Krylenko on demobil- 
isation of the army are to be held up. We cannot give you 
the peace terms, since peace really has not yet been con- 
cluded. Please hold up all telegrams reporting peace until 
you receive special permission. 

Written on January 30 
(February 12, 1918) 

First published in 1964 
in the book: A. L. Fraiman, 
Revolyutsionnaya zashchita 
Petrograda v fevrale-marte 1918, 
Moscow-Leningrad 

35 

TO A. L. KOLEGAYEV 

30. I. 1918 

Comrade Kolegayev, 

Please help the bearers (the First Russian Society of 
Communist Agricultural Workers) with advice and direc- 
tives as to how and where to obtain land. Their initiative 
is excellent; support it in every way. 26 

Lenin 

Written on January 30 
(February 12, 1918) 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

36 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

30. I. 1918 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

Please send on Sunday at two o'clock a suitable comrade 
from the Petrograd Soviet to the meeting of the Obukhov 



* Transmitted by direct line. The text of this telegram is repro- 
duced in the telegram of the Main Naval Headquarters to Centrobalt 
(the Central Executive Committee of the Soviets of Sailors of the 
Baltic Fleet).— Ed. 



Printed from the text 
of the telegraph tape 



62 



V. I. LENIN 



workers, who have formed the First Russian Society of 
Communist Agricultural Workers, to give directives, advice 
and help. 

It would be good to select an experienced practical 
organiser. 

Lenin 

Written on January 30 
(February 12, 1918) 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



37 

TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 

Commander-in-Chief Antonov 
Nikitovka 

Petrol shortage threatens to bring the mines to a stand- 
still; it will be impossible to pump out the water. We ur- 
gently ask you, if there is the slightest military possibility, 
to send all petrol to the mines, at the disposal of the Khar- 
kov Regional Economic Council, 27 Sumskaya. 

Lenin 

Written on January 30 
(February 12, 1918) 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



38 

TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 

Commander-in-Chief Antonov 
Nikitovka* 

We have nothing against the appointment of Kozhev- 
nikov. Make contact with Obolensky and the All-Ukraine 



* The address and sentences: "We have nothing against" and 
"Do not act without agreement with Obolensky and the C.E.C." 
were written in Lenin's hand. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO KULLERVO MANNER. FEBRUARY 14, 1918 63 



C.E.C. Do not act without agreement with Obolensky and 
the C.E.C; if there are no objections on their part, we 
agree to the appointment of Kozhevnikov as Commissar 
Extraordinary of the Donets Basin. 

Lenin 

Written on January 30 
(February 12, 1918) 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, written by Lenin and Stalin 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 and signed by Lenin 



39 

INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY 

Give this telegram to Chicherin and request him urgently 
to send an inquiry and protest to the Swedish Ambassa- 
dor. 27 

Lenin 

Written on February 14, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



40 

TELEGRAM TO KULLERVO MANNER 

Urgent 

Manner Governmental. Secret 

People's Government of Finland 

Helsingfors 

I request you immediately to obtain information from 
Centrobalt regarding the arrival of Swedish cruisers at 
Oland and the landing of troops by the Swedes. Be so kind 
as to let me know by telegraph as quickly as possible what 
information the Finnish Workers' Government has about 



64 



V. I. LENIN 



this and what its attitude is to this whole matter and to 
the intervention of Swedish armed forces. 28 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on February 14, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



41 

RADIO-TELEGRAM TO CENTROBALT 

Can the report really be true that Swedish warships came 
to Oland Island, landed a detachment and forced our men 
to retreat? What military measures of defence and counter- 
action has Centrobalt taken? What warships has it sent to 
Oland, and when precisely? 

Reply immediately. We are extremely concerned. We 
refuse to believe that Centrobalt and our revolutionary 
fleet have been inactive. I await a reply. 

Lenin 

Written on the night 
of February 14, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, of the telegraph tape 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



42 

TELEGRAM TO E. V. LUGANOVSKY, 
PEOPLE'S SECRETARY 
OF THE UKRAINIAN SOVIET REPUBLIC 

People's Secretary Luganovsky 
Kharkov 

Today Podvoisky, People's Commissar for Military 
Affairs, sent the following telegram to Kudinsky: 

"In accordance with the plenary powers given to you, you are to 
carry out the following: on the territory of the Ukrainian Soviet Re- 



TO CHAIRMAN OF M.R.C. OF DON REGION. FEBRUARY 16, 1918 65 



public your activities must be exactly co-ordinated with those of the 
Ukrainian Soviet authorities, hence your extraordinary plenary 
powers as regards the subordination of particular organs of power 
apply exclusively to the gubernias of Bryansk, Smolensk, Vitebsk, 
Orel, Voronezh and Tula." 

I hope that you will be satisfied with this and that 
Kudinsky will comply. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on February 15, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



43 

TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN 
OF THE MILITARY REVOLUTIONARY COMMITTEE 
OF THE DON REGION 

Governmental. Secret 

Chairman of the Regional M.R.C. of the Don Region 
Voronezh 

Have received your telegram of 31/1* concerning the 
capture of Shakhtnaya and Kamenolomni. I congratulate 
the Soviet troops on their success. I particularly thank you 
for the news of the dispatch of 60 waggons of coal through 
Tsaritsyn and earnestly request you to inform us by tele- 
graph of the numbers of trains with coal and grain and the 
precise days and hours of dispatch. It is extremely impor- 
tant. Send more grain. The letter of Alexeyev's spy has 
not yet been received. Send it by hand through a very 
reliable person, after taking a photograph of it. 29 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on February 16, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



February 13, 1918, new style.— Ed. 



66 



V. I. LENIN 



44 

TELEGRAM TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO 

Governmental 

Commander-in-Chief Antonov 
Nikitovka 

I have received the telegram concerning the appointment 
of Falkovsky by you. I insistently ask you to act only in 
full agreement with Luganovsky and in compliance with 
his directives as People's Secretary of the sovereign Ukrain- 
ian Republic. If disagreement with him arises, settle 
it through Skrypnik, Zatonsky, Bosh, in the last resort 
wire me, but never gainsay Luganovsky. The rich stores of 
the Rumanian Government must be very strictly guarded 
so that they can be turned over intact to the Rumanian 
people after the overthrow of the Rumanian counter- 
revolution. 

Lenin 

Written on February 17, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



45 

TO A. I. RYKOV 

Rykov 

1st, are there inventory data 

(1) where (addresses) are the goods? 

(2) who precisely (names and addresses) has all these 
goods? 

2nd, where (by whom, when?) was the order made for 
their safeguarding? 

Who is responsible for their safekeeping? 
3rd, who is responsible for their proper (rationed, by cards) 
distribution? 



TO THE C.C. OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.). FEBRUARY 22, 1918 67 



4th, what has been done (by whom?) for the free distribution 
to the poor of part of these and the whole amount of 
confiscated products? 30 

Written in February, 
after 18, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



46 

NOTE TO V. N. PODBELSKY IN MOSCOW 
BY DIRECT LINE, FEBRUARY 22, 1918 31 

I have no new verified information apart from the report 
that the Germans, generally speaking, are steadily advanc- 
ing because they do not encounter resistance. I consider 
the situation extremely grave and the slightest delay on 
our part is impermissible. As regards the report about 
Austria-Hungary not taking part in the war, I personally, 
unlike Trotsky, do not consider it verified; they say the 
radio has been intercepted and there were telegrams about 
this from Stockholm, but I have not seen such documents. 

Lenin 

Izvestia of the Soviets Printed from the text 

of Workers', Soldiers' of the telegraph tape 

and Peasants' Deputies 
of Moscow City and Moscow 
Region No. 31, February 
23 (10), 1918 



47 

TO THE C.C. OF THE R.S.D.L.P.(B.) 

Please include my vote in favour of getting potatoes 
and arms from the bandits of Anglo-French imperialism. 32 

Lenin 

Written on February 22, 1918 

First published in 1922 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works of N. Lenin 
(V. Ulyanov), Vol. XV 



68 



V. I. LENIN 



48 



RADIO-TELEGRAM TO THE PEACE DELEGATION 

Chicherin, Joffe, Karakhan, Sokolnikov 
Novoselye Railway Station 
Peace Delegation 

We do not quite understand your telegram. If you are 
wavering, it is impermissible. 33 Send envoys and try to 
reach the Germans quickly. 



Peace has not yet been signed, but a delegation has 
gone to Brest-Litovsk to sign the peace terms accepted 
by the C.E.C. and the C.P.C. Your resolution received. The 
German whiteguards and composite units of their regular 
army have joined with our whiteguards and are advancing 
on Petrograd with brazen audacity. A movement of large 
German forces in the wake of the advance detachments 
has been reported. Most of our troops are in flight.* The 
socialist fatherland is in danger. Dvinsk, Reval, Venden, 
Volmar, Minsk, Pskov have been taken. Our morale is 
good. Masses of workers have sprung to the defence of the 
Soviet Republic. The C.C. of the Bolsheviks is in favour 
of signing peace. The C.C. of the Left Socialist-Revolu- 
tionaries 34 is in favour of a holy war. 

As for gold, we recommend that the workers at the mines 
be paid at cost prices. There has been no special decree 
by the C.P.C. on gold. 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on February 25, 1918 

First published in 1929 
in Lenin Miscellany XI 



Printed from the original 



49 

TELEGRAM TO IRKUTSK 



Lenin 



Written on February 27, 1918 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the text in 
Gorbunov's hand with 
an addition by Lenin 



The two preceding sentences are in Lenin's hand. — Ed. 



TO MARIA ANDREYEVA. AFTER MARCH 12, 1918 



69 



50 

TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY 

4/III (19/11). 1918 

Comrade Dzerzhinsky, 

The bearer, Sidorenko, was my personal secretary for 
some days. I was quite satisfied with him. He was dis- 
missed on account of an incident when, being drunk, he 
shouted, as I have been informed, that he was "Lenin's 
secretary". 

Sidorenko tells me that he deeply regrets it. And per- 
sonally I am inclined to believe him; the lad is young 
and, in my opinion, very good. One must be lenient to 
youth. 

On the basis of all these facts, judge for yourself, and 
see what place you can find for him. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



51 

TO MARIA ANDREYEVA 

Maria Fyodorovna, 

Unfortunately, my colleagues (in the Council) consider 
it impossible for me to permit a meeting (bypassing the 
investigating commission), all the more so since medical 
aid (in case of illness) is available. 

I cannot go against the will and decision of my Council 
colleagues. 

Just now it is absolutely impossible for me to have a 
talk with you, as I cannot tear myself away. I will 
write you about the case of the "provocateur and black- 



70 



V. I. LENIN 



mailer" (obviously he was a blackmailer: Kartashov has 
long been in prison, I have made inquiries). 
I beg you to excuse me. 

All the best, 

Lenin 

Written after March 12, 1918 
but prior to September 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

52 

TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

Comrade Sergo, 

I beg you to pay serious attention to the Crimea and 
the Donets Basin with a view to creating a united fighting 
front against invasion from the West. Impress upon the 
Crimean comrades that the course of events makes defence 
imperative for them and that they must defend themselves 
irrespective of ratification of the peace treaty. Make them 
realise that the position of the north is substantially differ- 
ent from that of the south, and in view of the war, the 
actual war of the Germans against the Ukraine, help on the 
part of the Crimea, which (the Crimea) the Germans can 
gobble up in passing, is not only an act of neighbourly 
duty, but a requirement for self-defence and self-preserva- 
tion. It is possible that Slutsky, failing to grasp the com- 
plexity of the present situation, has taken some other, 
simplified line of his own — in which case he must be put 
in his place in my name. Immediate evacuation of grain 
and metals to the east, organisation of demolition groups, 
the creation of a united front of defence from the Crimea 
to Great Russia, drawing in the peasants, a decisive and 
unqualified transformation Ukrainian-wise of our units in 
the Ukraine — these are the present tasks. Antonov should 
be forbidden to call himself Antonov-Ovseyenko — he must 
call himself simply Ovseyenko. The same applies to Mura- 
vyov (if he remains in his post) and others. 

As regards the Donets Republic, tell Comrades Vasil- 



TO THE POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS BOARD. MARCH 26, 1918 71 



chenko, Zhakov and others that however much they may 
contrive to keep their region apart from the Ukraine, it — 
judging from the geography of Vinnichenko — will all the 
same be included in the Ukraine and the Germans will 
proceed to conquer it. In view of this, it is quite absurd 
for the Donets Republic to refuse a united defence front 
with the rest of the Ukraine. Mezhlauk was in Petrograd 
and he agreed to recognise the Donets Basin as an autono- 
mous part of the Ukraine; Artyom has also agreed to this; 
therefore the obstinacy of some comrades from the Donets 
Basin takes on the appearance of an entirely inexplicable 
and harmful whim which is absolutely impermissible in 
our Party midst. 

Bring this home to the comrades of the Crimea and Don- 
bas, Comrade Sergo, and get a united defence front set up. 

Lenin 

14 (1). III. 1918 

As regards money, arrange to issue what is essential for 
defence, but be extremely cautious; give it only into the 
most reliable hands and under the strictest control, as 
there are lots of people these days who are eager to grab 
or to throw money away.* 



First published in part in 1957 
in the book: Istoria grazhdanskoi 
voiny v SSSR. 1917-1922 

(The History of the Civil War 
in the U.S.S.R. 1917-1922), Vol. 3 

Published in full in 1960 
in the book: Iz istorii 
grazhdanskoi voiny v SSSR, Vol. 1 



Printed from the text 
in Stalin's hand 
with an addition by Lenin 



53 

TO THE POSTS AND TELEGRAPHS BOARD 

26. III. 1918 

Please inform me: 

(1) Is there a work-time schedule operating in the tele- 
graph department under which a person does 24 hours' 
duty and then gets three days off? 

* The signature, date and last sentence are in Lenin's handwrit- 
ing.— Ed. 



72 



V. I. LENIN 



(2) If so, when was this introduced and by whose order 
or decision? Please send in the full text and the names of 
those responsible for it. 

(3) What measures, and when and by whom, have been 
taken to abolish such an obviously incorrect and imper- 
missible work schedule. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 

54 

TELEGRAM TO THE SOVNARKOM 
OF THE PETROGRAD LABOUR COMMUNE 35 

Governmental 

Urgent 
Report receipt 

28. III. 1918 
Sovnarkom of the Petrograd Labour Commune 
Smolny, Petrograd 

Copies to Shlyapnikov, Chairman of the Evacuation 
Commission, and to Gorbunov, Secretary of the C.P.C. 

I have received Gorbunov's memorandum. I strongly 
protest against the delay in the evacuation of industry. 36 
Larin and Milyutin have no right to alter the decision. 
If anyone is dissatisfied with my order, let him complain 
to the C.P.C. or C.E.C., but until my order is cancelled 
its fulfilment is obligatory. I am particularly indignant at 
the milliards' worth of stores on Gutuyev Island being left 
untouched. That is disgraceful. The evacuation of these stores 
must be begun at all costs and carried out in the speediest 
manner. 37 The Sovnarkom to send in twice weekly precise 
reports on what has actually been done for the evacuation 
and how many truck-loads have been evacuated. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO THE SOVNARKOM. APRIL 1, 1918 



73 



55 

TO THE SECRETARY 
OF THE COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 

There are evidently persons sitting here who have been 
invited for a different question. 
They need not be sent away. 

But I reprimand you and the other secretaries; you have 
been told a hundred times that people are to be invited 
only for the question that concerns them. 

Written in March-April 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



56 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 

You have not been "bullied", but, on the contrary, 
treated too leniently. 

1) Have all the secretaries sign a notice that during 
sessions of the C.P.C. only notes may be handed up, but 
talk is forbidden. 

2) Post up a similar notice in the Secretariat. 

Written not earlier than 
March 1918 and not later 
than September 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



57 

TELEGRAM TO THE SOVNARKOM 
OF THE PETROGRAD LABOUR COMMUNE 

Chairman of the Sovnarkom 

of the Petrograd Labour Commune 

In accordance with your statement by telephone we ex- 
pect the immediate and formal withdrawal of the Red 
Guard detachments, which, though few in number, entered 



74 



V. I. LENIN 



Finland against the wishes of the Soviet authorities. We 
insist that a formal decision to this effect should be passed 
by the Sovnarkom of the Petrograd Commune. We urgently 
request to be informed immediately of the full text of 
this decision. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on April 1, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI of the telegraph form 



58 

CONVERSATION WITH V. V. KUIBYSHEV 
BY DIRECT LINE 

Kuibyshev, Chairman of the Soviet of Deputies, on the line in Samara 

Comrade Lenin, Dutov's forces have again become active in Oren- 
burg; a report has been received that Cossack detachments are advanc- 
ing within twenty versts of Orenburg. Iletsk is encircled by Cossacks. 
The Cossacks are mobilising all the villages; they are committing 
terrible atrocities, three members of the Executive Committee, and 
Zakharov, Chairman of the Cossack Section of the Soviet, have been 
killed. The bourgeoisie of Orenburg is actively participating. Oren- 
burg requests the Council of People's Commissars to help uproot this 
Dutov adventure, otherwise there will again be a blockage, which 
will cause the death through famine of 12,000,000 inhabitants of Tur- 
kestan. One detachment sent from Orenburg to Iletsk was surrounded 
and wiped out to a man; government commissar Tsvilling is believed 
to have been killed. Samara will strain all efforts to help Orenburg, 
but the local forces are insufficient to liquidate Dutov's bands com- 
pletely; help from the centre is essential. I have finished and await 
a reply. 

I shall take all steps immediately to notify the military 
authorities and give you assistance. 

Lenin 



Written in April, not earlier 
than 2 and not later than 4, 1918 

First published on January 26, 1935, 
in Pravda No. 25 



Printed from the original 



TO Y. M. SVERDLOV AND S. P. SEREDA. APRIL 8, 1918 75 



59 

TELEGRAM TO THE C.E.C. OF THE SOVIETS 
OF SIBERIA 

I fully approve the resolution of Centrosibir. 38 I advise 
you to prepare stores of foodstuffs and other products even 
if by requisitioning, in order to build up a serious defence. 
Our talks with the ambassadors should begin today. 39 It is 
clear now that no trust can be put in assurances and the 
only serious guarantee lies in solid military preparations 
on our part. 

Lenin 

Written on April 5, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten copy 



60 

TO THE C.E.C. OF THE SOVIETS OF SIBERIA 

I have received Yakovlev's memorandum. 40 I approve 
the plans of preparation and mobilisation. If they advance, 
offer resistance. I have passed it on to the Commissariat 
for Military Affairs. We shall try to help by sending money 
although our difficulties are extremely great. 

Please send information more frequently. 

Lenin 

Written on April 6, 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



61 

TO Y. M. SVERDLOV AND S. P. SEREDA 

8. IV. 1918 

Comrade Sverdlov 
and Comrade Sereda 

The bearer, Comrade Kharlov, who has been working for 
eleven months in the peasant Soviets of Pskov Gubernia, 



76 



V. I. LENIN 



is an agronomist by speciality with five years' practical 
experience. A member of the Bolshevik Party since 1905 
(he has been on the books in Petrograd, Vasilyevsky Island, 
since March 1917). Please have a talk with him about work 
in the Commissariat for Agriculture and his possible partic- 
ipation in it. 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

62 

TO D. P. BOGOLEPOV AND A. D. TSYURUPA 

10. IV. 1918 

Comrade Bogolepov 

(Deputy Commissar for Finance) 

Comrade Tsyurupa 

(or Comrade Bryukhanov) 

The bearers of this note, representatives of the Pskov 
Gubernia Soviet, have so far been unable to obtain the 
food and financial assistance they are so badly in need of. 
The situation in Pskov Gubernia (especially owing to the 
German invasion; about one-ninth of the gubernia has been 
occupied) is desperate. I ask you most earnestly to consider 
what extraordinary measures you can adopt to help them, 
and to telephone me to talk it over. 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

63 

TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR JUSTICE 

I request the members of the Board of the Commissariat 
for Justice (preferably all of them) to visit me (we can agree 
on the day and time) for a talk about the following: 

1) what precisely has been done for publishing a Col- 
lection of Laws and Decrees, 



TO SOVIET AND WORKERS' ORGANISATIONS OF RYBINSK 77 



2) — for codification, 

3) — for ensuring speedier and more ruthless court action 
against the bourgeoisie, embezzlers of state property, etc., 

4) — for juridical propaganda among the population, among 
the workers and poor peasants 

(a) in printed form; 

(b) by lectures (or classes, and so on), 

5) — for drawing the poor into the work of court proceed- 
ings (jurors) and investigation, 

6) — for using Shreider's personnel and others. 



64 

TO THE SOVIET AND WORKERS' ORGANISATIONS 

OF RYBINSK 41 

Comrade Dyrenkov's account of the measures taken by 
him in Rybinsk to tighten work discipline and of the sup- 
port for them on the part of the workers has shown me that 
the Rybinsk comrades are correctly tackling the most im- 
portant and most urgent tasks of the day, and I ask the 
representatives of Soviet power and workers' organisations 
in the city of Rybinsk to accept my wishes for still more 
energetic efforts and the achievement of the greatest suc- 
cesses in this field. 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



Written on April 15, 1918 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



Printed from the original 



Vladimir Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



Written in April, not earlier 
than 15, 1918 

Published on May 16 (29), 1918 
in Izvestia of the Rybinsk Soviet 
of Workers' Peasants' and Soldiers' 
Deputies No. 105 



Printed from 
the newspaper text 



78 



V. I. LENIN 



65 

TO D. P. BOGOLEPOV AND I. E. GUKOVSKY 

16. IV. 1918 

Comrades Bogolepov and Gukovsky 

I send you the draft of a law on shares. / want you 
urgently and without fail to 

1) discuss it, 

2) make your corrections, 

3) immediately invite to the discussion specialists known 
to you (ask them for their opinion — preferably in writing); 
from the professors you can order a commentary, 

4) all this needs to be completed by tomorrow, for to- 
morrow, 17. IV, we have to endorse the decree in the 
C.P.C. 42 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 

66 

TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN 
OF THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD SOVIET 

Chairman of the Soviet 
Nizhni-Novgorod 

According to a statement of the Commissar for Finance, 
obstacles are being put in the way of a complete inspection 
of the State Bank appointed by him and the control bodies. 
I direct that every facility be afforded for a complete and 
thoroughgoing inspection of the State Bank and assistance 
given to the inspectors. Please let me know by telegram 
that the inspectors have been given full opportunity to 
discharge their duties.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on April 17, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 
in Lenin Miscellany XXI Gorbunov's handwriting, 
added to and signed by Lenin 

* The text from the words "Please let me know" is in Lenin's 
handwriting. — Ed. 



TO THE NARROW C.P.C. APRIL 21, 1918 



79 



67 

TELEGRAM TO THE CHAIRMAN 
OF THE SIMBIRSK SOVIET* 

Chairman of the Soviet 
Simbirsk 

Inform me by telegram of the circumstances and condi- 
tions of election of heads of Chuvash teachers' seminaries 
for men and women. I am interested in the fate of Inspec- 
tor Ivan Yakovlevich Yakovlev, who has worked for fifty 
years for the advance of the Chuvash people and suffered 
persecution from tsarism. I think Yakovlev should not be 
torn away from his life's work. 43 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on April 20, 1918 

First published on January 19, Printed from the original 

1928, in the newspaper 
Proletaraky Put (Ulyanovsk) 
No. 16 



68 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 44 

21. IV. 1918 

The Narrow Council 

In the affair concerning the reorganisation of the Red 
Cross, which has become known to me through V. M. Bonch- 
Bruyevich, I strongly advise: 

1) that written explanations be demanded 

(a) from all members of the committee 

(§ 3, section I), 

(b) from all departments, which should have sent re- 
presentatives — 



* At the top of the document Lenin wrote: "Please send the bill 
for this telegram to me personally." — Ed. 



80 



V. I. LENIN 



— explanations as to when the committee met, where its 
minutes are, etc. 

It is necessary not only to admonish, but to prosecute 
a number of persons (they must be found) for non-fulfilment 
of the decree. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



69 

TELEGRAM TO P. F. VINOGRADOV 

Vinogradov, Gubernia Executive Committee 
Archangel 

People's Commissar Tsyurupa has shown me your tele- 
gram to him of 21. IV. No. 1192, in which you refer to an 
order of the central Soviet authorities as being absurd. 

I officially reprimand you for this and state that if you 
do not withdraw such an impermissible expression, I shall 
raise the question of your being brought before the court, 
for if we are conscientious in teaching discipline to work- 
ers and peasants, we are obliged to begin with ourselves. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written in April, not 
earlier than 21, 1918 

First published in part 
in 1940 in the journal Bolshevik No. 3 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



70 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

Comrade Chicherin 

Couldn't we, having in view Mirbach's arrival, "pre- 
pare" an interpretation of our constitution under which 



TO PRESS BUREAU OF THE C.P.C. APRIL 27, 1918 



81 



ambassadors present their letters of credence to the Chair- 
man of the C.E.C.? 

Lenin 

Written in April, 
prior to 23, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



71 

TO A. I. RYKOV 

Push hard in the Supreme Economic Council for a dis- 
cussion on replacing the old paper currency by new; Gu- 
kovsky jibs at it, but I think it should be pushed forward. 45 
Your opinion? 

Written on April 23, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



72 

TO THE PRESS BUREAU OF THE C.P.C. 

27. IV. 1918 

To the Press Bureau 

Comrade Axelrod, 

Will you please help the bearer, Comrade Gomberg, to 
collect all (printed) materials concerning our revolution. 
This is a matter of great social importance, for on it de- 
pends the information of America and of the world at large. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



82 



V. I. LENIN 



73 

TO RAYMOND ROBINS 46 

30. IV. 1918 

Dear Mr. Robins, 

I thank you very much for your letter. I am sure the 
new democracy, that is, the proletarian democracy, is 
coming in all countries and will crush all obstacles and the 
imperialist-capitalist system in the new and the old world. 

With kindly regards and thanks, 

Yours truly, 

Lenin 

First published in Russian Printed from the original 

in 1957 in the book: Written in English 

Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR 
(Documents of the Foreign 
Policy of the U.S.S.R.), Vol. I 



74 

A. D. TSYURUPA 

Comrade Tsyurupa 

Sapronov from the Moscow Gubernia Soviet describes the 
catastrophic food situation in Moscow Gubernia and insists 
on the need to increase the delivery orders for grain. At 
least a minimum quota should be fixed. The amount given 
to the peasants must be increased, otherwise they will eat 
up all the seed and wont sow. 

What can be done? What has been done? 

Lenin 

Written not earlier 
than April 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



75 

TO P. P. MALINOVSKY 47 

Why is it that, contrary to the decision of the C.P.C. 
and in spite of unemployment (and in spite of May Day), 
work has not been begun in Moscow 



TO THE C.C. OF THE R.C.P.(B.). MAY 1918 



83 



1) on a proper removal of tsarist monuments? 

2) on the removal of tsarist eagles? 

3) on preparing hundreds of inscriptions (revolutionary 
and socialist) on all public buildings? 

4) on setting up busts (if only temporary ones) of vari- 
ous great revolutionaries? 



Written between May 1 and 13, 1918 

First published on April 20, 1963, 
in the newspaper Sovetskaya 
Kultura No. 49 



Printed from the original 



76 

TELEGRAM TO V. N. ANDRONNIKOV, 
REGIONAL BOARD 
OF NATIONALISED ENTERPRISES OF THE URALS 

Andronnikov 
Regional Board 
Ekaterinburg 

Rumours about the denationalisation of the Bogoslovsk 
district are stupid nonsense. 48 

Lenin 

Written on May 2, 1918 

First published in 1927 Printed from the original 

in the book: Rabochii klass 
Urala v gody voiny i revolyutsii 
(The Working Class of the Urals 
in the Years of War 
and Revolution), Vol. Ill, 
Sverdlovsk 



77 

TO THE C.C. OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 49 

1) The proposal of Comrades Spiridonova and Karelin 
is that the Bolsheviks should surrender to the Left S.R.s 
absolute control of the Commissariat for Agriculture, with 
the Bolsheviks retaining only political representation. 



84 



V. I. LENIN 



2) The grounds for this proposal are that, in the opinion 
of Comrades Spiridonova and Karelin, the Commissariat 
for Agriculture is going to pieces, work is becoming im- 
possible for the Left S.R.s, they will all be compelled to 
leave, because — it is alleged — they are being "ousted", etc. 

3) The meeting (of Lenin with the Bolsheviks from the 
Agriculture Board) refers the question raised by the S.R.s 
to the C.C. of the Party for decision. For its part, the meet- 
ing considers the arguments of the S.R.s groundless and 
their proposal unacceptable.* 

Written on May 3, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



78 

DRAFT OF A RADIO-TELEGRAM 
TO THE PEACE DELEGATION IN KURSK 

In the Ukraine there has been a coup d'etat. 50 

Bourgeois-landowner rule completely restored. 

Rostov-on-Don taken by the Germans. 51 

British threaten with a British and Japanese offensive. 

Germans demand the seizure of Ino by the Finns and the 
Murmansk railway to fight the British. 52 

We are holding emergency meeting of C.C. of the Party 
on all this. 53 

Your policy is to exert all efforts to hasten the conclu- 
sion of an armistice and peace, at the price, of course, of 
new annexations. 

Written on May 6, 1918 

First published in 1929 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XI 



* The text of point 3 is in the handwriting of V. N. Meshcherya- 
kov. The document is signed by V. N. Meshcheryakov, S. P. Sereda, 
and N. M. Petrovsky.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO C.E.C. OF SOVIETS OF SIBERIA. MAY 8, 1918 85 



79 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 54 

You should have drawn up a statement of the case con- 
cerning the refusal to admit the inspectors and asked me 
to take legal action against the guilty parties. 

Written on May 7 and 8, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



80 

TELEGRAM TO THE C.E.C. OF THE SOVIETS 
OF SIBERIA 

Centrosibir 
Irkutsk 

Copy to Prokopiev 

Prokopiev and others are flooding Larin with telegrams, 
asking for money. 

I state that I have not received a reply to my telegram 
of 23. IV giving exact figures.* I state that such an attitude 
to the matter, when no reply is given as to what use has 
been made of hundreds of millions, and why an extra sum 
above the quota is needed and how much, is impermissible. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on May 8, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



See Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, Document 122.— Ed. 



86 



V. I. LENIN 



81 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 55 

Comrade Tsyurupa, 

People's Commissar for Food 

The bearer — Andrei Vasilievich Ivanov — is a Putilov 
factory worker (who is well known to Shlyapnikov and has 
old Party certificates dating from tsarist times). 

I told him about yesterday's decree and the decision 
that the Commissariat for Labour was to urgently mobilise 
workers. I gave him my opinion as follows: 

Unless the best workers of Petrograd build by selection 
a reliable workers' army of 20,000 people for a disciplined 
and ruthless military crusade against the rural bourgeoisie 
and against bribe-takers, famine and the ruin of the revo- 
lution are inevitable. 

Please confirm this to the bearer and give him a brief 
statement that you will grant such detachments the fullest 
plenary powers on precisely such conditions. 

Please give him such a statement to be read in Petrograd, 
and return this letter to the bearer. 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on May 10, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII the typewritten copy 



82 

TO M. G. BRONSKY 

Comrade Bronsky, 

And so, it is precisely agreed between us that 

(1) at tomorrow's meeting with the Germans you will be 
the first to speak (none of the Russians before you), 56 

(2) you will first read the theses (afterwards make a 
speech, or a report, or a commentary), 

(3) you will show me the theses tomorrow before the meet- 
ing (i.e., in the morning before 2 o'clock; I shall be leaving 
after that). 



TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL. MAY 16, 1918 



87 



This is extremely important. It is a directive of the C.C. 
and the C.P.C. It is obligatory! 

Lenin 

Written on May 14, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



83 

TO RAYMOND ROBINS 

May 14, 1918 

To Colonel Robins 

Dear Mr. Robins, 

I enclose the preliminary plan of our economic relations 
with America. This preliminary plan was elaborated in the 
Council of Export Trade in our highest Council of National 
Economy. 57 

I hope this preliminary can be useful for you in your 
conversation with the American Foreign Office and 
American Export Specialists. 

With best thanks, 

Yours truly, 

Lenin 

First published in 1920 Printed from 

in English in the book: the English text 

Russian-American Relations. 
March 1917-March 1920. Documents 
and Papers, New York 

First published in Russian 
in 1957 in the book: 
Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR 
Vol. I 



84 

TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL 

May 16, 1918 

Chairman of the Supreme Military Council 

The Supreme Military Council is directed to send envoys — 
through the appropriate military authorities at the front 



88 



V. I. LENIN 



— for the purpose of signing a truce and establishing a 
demarcation line on the South-Eastern (Don) Front. In 
order that appropriate instructions may be given to the 
military authorities, we inform you that our envoys are in 
Kharkov at the present moment, headed by Sytin, military 
commander of the Bryansk General Staff units, who has 
been given instructions to secure a general truce on the 
Voronezh and South-Eastern fronts. A truce, especially on 
the South-Eastern (Don) Front, must be secured as quickly 
as possible, in the last resort agreeing even to accepting 
as a basis the present disposition of military forces. 

Sytin has been instructed to try to secure through the 
medium of the German Command direct contact with our 
Command on the South-Eastern Front for co-ordinated 
action. 

With the same aim in view, the Supreme Military Council, 
by all the means available to it, should maintain constant 
contact both with Sytin and with our Command on the 
South-Eastern Front. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



85 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 58 

Chicherin: 

In my opinion, the Brest treaty cannot forbid us to com- 
bat pirate-insurgents (armed merchant vessels), and it is 
necessary to find a form for our naval forces to give an 
armed rebuff to the rebels. 

Lenin 

Written on May 16, 1918 



First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from the original 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. MAY 20, 1918 89 



86 

EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

1) Has your draft (on the organisation of supply commis- 
sariats) been communicated to all departments? 

2) Take the floor today on a point of order about submit- 
ting it for discussion tomorrow. 

3) Is there not too much bureaucratic formality in your 
draft? Should not a point be inserted in the decree pro- 
viding for the participation of 20-50 workers (with very strict 
recommendations) in each of the supply commissariats in 
the grain-producing gubernias? 59 



A. D. TSYURUPA'S REPLY 

1) The draft has been discussed with regional officials, and ap- 
proved by Rykov and the Supreme Economic Council in the section 
concerning the establishment of a Commissariat for Supply (cen- 
tral). 

2) I will rise to a point of order. 

3) The draft provides for the setting up of supply commissariats 
under the Soviets, the supply commissariats must not be unwieldy. 
A point about the participation of 20-50 workers in each commis- 
sariat of the grain-producing gubernias may be inserted, but it should 
be for their participation in the technical apparatus as cadres to be 
sent out to the volosts. 

The introduction of such a number of workers in the composition 
of the commissariats will evoke protests in the local areas. 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

Not in the composition of the commissariats, of course, 
but as cadres of 

1) agitators 

2) controllers 

3) executors. 

Written on May 20, 1918 



First published in 1931 
in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



Printed from the original 



90 



V. I. LENIN 



87 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

A Food Commissariat circular — or better still, perhaps 
a decree of the C.P.C. — should be drawn up, making it 
amply clear: 

— that the delegatkoms* should be allowed to work 
jointly with the gubernia food committees and under 
their control; 

— that the separate existence and separate operation of 

the delegatkoms is impermissible; 
— that such a thing invariably leads to the infiltration 

of profiteers; 

— that especially desirable is the assistance of the de- 
legatkoms and their participation in agitation against 
the kulaks and profiteers under the guidance of agi- 
tators' detachments of the gubernia food committees, 
etc. 

All this should be set out and published in greatest detail 
and in an extremely popular manner. 

Written on May 20, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



88 

TO A. A. JOFFE AND V. R. MENZHINSKY 

24/V. 1918 

Comrades Joffe and Menzhinsky 

Dear Comrades, 

I have received your pessimistic and angry letters (that 
of 20. V, I received today, 24. V). Some of your accusations 
levelled against Chicherin fall on me. For example, I in- 
sisted that the theses on concessions should be sent through 



* Delegatkoms — delegate committees under the gubernia food 
committees, consisting of delegates from army units, representatives 
of the consuming districts and others. — Ed. 



TO A. A. JOFFE AND V. R. MENZHINSKY. MAY 24, 1918 91 



the Germans, in order to show them how seriously we de- 
sire business-like economic relations. (The theses were drawn 
up by common consent with the participation of Radek 
and other "Left stupids".) The terms of our concessions 
are such that nothing but benefit for us will result if the 
Germans accept these terms. 

I fully approve your policy, set out in especial detail 
in Comrade Joffe's letters, 

Your dissatisfaction with Chicherin is, in my opinion, 
exaggerated. But in any case I agree to help you and I ask 
you to direct your efforts to practical ways of improving 
matters. For this, I would suggest that you precisely for- 
mulate concrete proposals (send me copies of telegrams and 
letters, parts that are strictly practical and brief, for I 
simply have no time to read everything). In that case I 
promise to try to secure their fulfilment and to check whether 
they have been fulfilled. 

You must think over how to shift the centre of things 
to Berlin to a greater extent (I agree to help in this), and 
propose for this purpose very tactful (N.B.) and concretely 
practical measures. I shall accept all feasible measures and 
endeavour to have them carried out. 

If anything can be done to secure peace with Finland, 
the Ukraine and Turkey (this is the crux of the matter), we 
must always work for this (of course, it cannot be secured 
without certain further annexations and tribute payments). 
I would give much to hasten such a peace. 

You, too, should keep your nerve. Putting diplomacy to 
rights (and creating a new diplomacy) is no easy task. Fes- 
tina lente. 

With best greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

P.S. 

28/V. I missed the messenger. 

Chicherin has given me the text of a Note which Joffe 
sent to the German Government on his own account, agreeing 
to surrender the ships of the Black Sea Fleet (i.e., to their 
removal from Novorossiisk to Sevastopol) 60 on condition 



92 



V. I. LENIN 



merely of peace with the Ukraine. However, our govern- 
ment in a clearly worded Note (communicated by radio 
to Joffe as well) considered it possible to agree to the re- 
moval of the ships to Sevastopol on different conditions, 
viz.: 1) peace on all three fronts, i.e., with the Ukraine and 
Finland and Turkey; 2) no annexation of Sevastopol. 

How could Joffe make such a mistake? How could he 
make such a "bad bargain"? How in general he could send a 
Note on such an important question on his own account, I 
fail to understand.... 

N.B. Send us Arbeiterpolitik, the Stuttgart Sozialdemo- 
krat 61 and similar publications, all, complete, 5-10 copies 
of each. 

Have you begun some legal publication in German? What 
precisely? What is the plan of publication and when will it 
appear? 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



89 

INSTRUCTION ON THE REPORT 
OF THE CHIEF OF MAIN NAVAL HEADQUARTERS 

In view of the hopelessness of the situation as certified 
by the supreme military authorities, the fleet must be de- 
stroyed forthwith. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

Written on May 24, 1918 

First published in 1938 Printed from the original 

in the journal Morskoi Sbornik 
No. 6 



TELEGRAM TO KINESHMA SOVIET. MAY 24, 1918 



93 



90 

TO S. G. SHAHUMYAN 

Moscow, May 24, 1918 

Dear Comrade Shahumyan, 

I take the opportunity to send you once again a few words 
(I sent you a letter by hand recently; did you receive it? 62 ). 

The Baku situation is a difficult one internationally. 
I would advise you therefore to attempt a bloc with Jor- 
dania. If that is impossible, you must manoeuvre and post- 
pone a decision until you are stronger militarily. A sober 
estimate and diplomacy for a postponement — remember 
that. 

Get the radio going and send me letters through Astra- 
khan. 

All the best, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to Baku 

Bulletins of the Dictatorship Printed from the text 

of the C. C. of the Caspian of Bulletins 

Flotilla and of the Presidium 
of the Provisional 
Executive Committee 
No. 33, September 8, 1918 



91 

TELEGRAM TO THE KINESHMA SOVIET 63 

Soviet of Deputies 
Kineshma 

To all workers of the Kineshma district. Comrade workers, 
the rich in the villages of the producing gubernias are hoard- 
ing huge stocks of grain and not giving them up for the 
starving workers. The rich prefer to sell grain at exorbitant 
speculative prices, which only the city bourgeoisie can 
pay, but not the poor, starving population. While specu- 
lating in grain, the rich seek to speculate also in the goods 
they receive in exchange for grain. The city bourgeoisie 
is agitating for the abolition of the grain monopoly and 
fixed prices, and for freedom to trade in grain. The bour- 
geoisie is passing from agitation to provocation; it is skil- 



94 



V. I. LENIN 



fully and surreptitiously inciting the starving workers to 
demonstrations, disturbances and disorders, while endeav- 
ouring to seize power in its own hands. The Council of 
People's Commissars is exerting every effort in the strug- 
gle to uphold the grain monopoly, in the absence of which 
only the bourgeoisie will prosper while the poor will be 
left without any grain at all. Comrade workers, do not 
give way to the provocation of the dark forces, do not play 
into the hands of the bourgeoisie and the counter-revolu- 
tionaries who want to make cat's-paws of you and destroy 
all the gains of the revolution. Do not disorganise the hard 
work of obtaining grain for you by thoughtless actions on 
your part and independent exchange of goods. The Council 
of People's Commissars is now exchanging goods for grain 
on a vast scale; it has begun requisitioning grain stocks 
from the village bourgeoisie by means of armed detach- 
ments. If you want to help, to co-operate with your workers' 
and peasants' government, act in an organised way: select 
from among you those who are most familiar with the food 
business for work in the Soviet food supply bodies, recruit 
fighting detachments of honest, incorruptible, steadfast 
revolutionaries, true champions of the interests of the work- 
ers and peasants. Immediately detain provocators and 
agents of the counter-revolution and deliver them to 
Moscow. Bear firmly in mind: either we extricate ourselves 
from all our unprecedented difficulties in an organised way, 
and with honour, or everything is inevitably doomed to 
complete ruin. There is no other alternative. In the expec- 
tation of speedy results from these measures, the Council 
of People's Commissars asks you, comrade workers, to dis- 
play revolutionary self-discipline and political alertness in 
order to save the gains of the revolution and ensure the 
triumph of the proletarian dictatorship. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars* 

Written on May 24, 1918 

Published on May 29, 1918, Printed from 

in the newspaper Rabochy the typewritten text 

i Krestyanin No. 50 



* The telegram was signed also by A. D. Tsyurupa, People's Com- 
missar for Food.— Ed. 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. MAY 28, 1918 95 



92 

TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV 

Shlyapnikov 

The Central Committee has passed a decision to direct 
the maximum number of Party workers to the food front. 

For obviously we shall perish and ruin the whole revo- 
lution if we do not conquer famine in the next few months. 

It is essential that you be temporarily employed on food 
supply (while retaining the rank of People's Commissar 
for Labour). I am confident that you will carry out the 
directive of the C.C. 

I think that you ought to go to the Kuban to help pump 
grain out from there. 

You must decide today and make immediate arrangements 
with Tsyurupa. 

Written on May 28, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



93 

EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA 

V. I., 

How has the question about using the army in the struggle for 
requisitioning grain been decided? If it has been decided affirmative- 

ly, how will the thing be arranged officially — by way of an agree- 
ment with the Commissariat for Military Affairs or by the issue of a 
decree?* 

It is very important to know this, for today Kudinsky has been 
arrested (apparently by Comrade Dzerzhinsky's Commission), our 
work threatens to come to a complete stop. 

A. Tsyurupa 

X 

Precisely along these lines. Telephone Trotsky today 
(from my box), so that he gets everything moving tomorrow. 



* Underlined by Lenin.— Ed. 



96 



V. I. LENIN 



I have just written to Shlyapnikov about his going to 
the Kuban. He should make arrangements with you today. 
I advise you right now, today, to appoint him from the 
C.P.C. 

Stalin has agreed to go to the Northern Caucasus. Send him. He 
knows the local conditions. Shlyapnikov will find it better with him 
too. 

A. Ts. 

I fully agree. See them both off today. 

Written on May 28, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



94 

TO THE EDITORS OF IZVESTIA 

30. V. 1918 

The Editors of Izvestia 

The bearers are representatives of the Yelets Soviet. 
Will you please publish an interview with them in the 
newspaper. It is a model uyezd as regards good order, 
registration of cultivated estates and their economy, and 
as regards suppression of the bourgeoisie. 

With comradely greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



95 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

31. V. 1918 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

The bearer, Comrade Bach, has a mandate from Centro- 
transport of Siberia. He asks to hasten the issue and 
dispatch to Siberia of 137 automobiles which the Motor 



TO THE AMERICAN SOCIALIST INTERNATIONALISTS. MAY 1918 97 



Section (of Petrograd) (the Petrograd Commune) requested 
the Motor Centre to remove from Petrograd as useless. We 
have passed a decision to have all lorries handed over to 
the food department. 64 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



96 

TELEGRAM TO THE VYKSA WORKERS 65 

Vedernikov 
Vyksa 

Kulebaki, Kazan-Moscow Railway 

I very much hope that the worker comrades of Vyksa, 
in carrying out their excellent plan of a mass movement 
with machine-guns to obtain grain, will act as genuine 
revolutionaries, that is, they will staff the detachment 
with selected reliable people who will not behave like rob- 
bers, and who will work to the schedules and in full agree- 
ment with Tsyurupa for the common cause of saving from 
famine all the starving people, and not merely for them- 
selves. 

Lenin 

Written on May 31, 1918 

First published in part on 
June 2, 1918, in Izvestia 
No. Ill 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



97 

TO THE AMERICAN SOCIALIST INTERNATIONALISTS 66 

Through the American comrade Albert R. Williams I 
send my greetings to the American socialist international- 
ists. I firmly believe that in the long run the social 



98 



V. I. LENIN 



revolution will be victorious in all civilised countries. 
When it begins in America it will far surpass the Russian 
revolution. 

Written in May 1918 

First published in 1925 in the 
magazine Ogonyok No. 4 (95) 

Published in 1960 in the book: 
Albert Rhys Williams, O Lenine 
i Oktyabrskoi Revolyutsii 
(On Lenin and the October 
Revolution), Moscow 

98 

TO A. A. JOFFE 

2/VI. 1918 

Comrade Joffe, 

Sokolnikov and Bukharin are to make a trip to you, and 
Larin, too, I believe. 67 I take this opportunity to give 
you a little warning. I am sitting at a meeting with the 
"travellers" (without Larin). I hear talk about "Joffe trans- 
ferring the Commissariat for Foreign Affairs to Berlin". 

The friction between you and Chicherin is sometimes 
used — unconsciously rather than consciously — as a means 
towards intensifying this friction. 

I am confident that you will be on your guard and will 
not allow this friction to grow. I have read attentively 
your letters and I am absolutely convinced that this fric- 
tion is unimportant (there is chaos everywhere, careless- 
ness everywhere — in all commissariats — and this evil is 
slow to cure). Given patience and persistence the friction 
will be smoothed over. Chicherin is a splendid worker. 
Your line is quite faithful to the Brest treaty, you are al- 
ready successful, I think — and hence it follows that we shall 
easily smooth away the friction. 

If the German traders will accept economic advantages, 
realising that nothing is to be got from us by war, for we 
shall burn everything — then your policy will continue to be 
successful. We can give the Germans raw materials. In 
important cases, send me copies of your exact demands. 
Arrange for a direct line as quickly as possible. 

Bukharin acts in good faith, but he is up to the neck 
in "Left stupidness". Sokolnikov has gone astray again. 



Printed from 
the text of the book 



TELEGRAM TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN. JUNE 3, 1918 



99 



Larin is a floundering intellectual, a first-class bungler. 
Therefore be extremely on your guard with all these most 
charming, most admirable delegates. Sokolnikov is a very 
valuable worker, but sometimes (as just now) something 
"comes over him" and he "breaks china" because of para- 
doxes. If you do not take precautions, he will break china 
there with you. And Bukharin — triply so. Prenez garde! 

I hope that Krasin and Hanecki, being business-like peo- 
ple, will help you and the whole matter will be smoothed out. 

Thank you for the "supplement" to your letter. I await 
some more. 

Best regards, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

P.S. 

N.B.: Among the Russian Bolsheviks taken prisoner 
by Germany (Zivilgefangene) was Popov of Brussels, taken 
in Belgium. Could you find him and take him into our 
service? 

P. P.S. Try to send this enclosure to Switzerland by 
messenger — but not by post. 68 

Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



99 

TELEGRAM TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN 

Gubernia Soviet 
Tula 

Forward to Panyushkin 

Surprised at absence of news. Inform urgently how much 
grain collected, how many trucks sent, how many specula- 
tors and kulaks arrested. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on June 3, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



100 



V. I. LENIN 



100 

EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA 69 
Tsyurupa: 

In view of the furious agitation of enemies and "waver- 
ers" and its influence on the workers in Petrograd, Mos- 
cow, etc., 

I think you ought to publish (and distribute as a leaf- 
let at the factories) something in the nature of a letter 
to the workers, saying: 

they are trying to scare you — 

the waverers are sowing panic — 

they are talking of "independent procurements" — 

they criticise the "centre", throwing the blame on 
others — 

and so forth. 

But you, workers, should not believe the whiners, sow- 
ers of panic and fault-finders, 

but set to work: let every factory send to our aid trust- 
worthy people with a guarantee, with a surety, we shall 
show them where the obstacle lies, what the difficulty is, 
and they will help us. 

Would you be able to place such people? 

A. D. TSYURUPA'S REPLY 

Yes, we can arrange it. Your proposal will be implemented. A 
small group of workers has already had a number of reports on the 
food question read to them (something like lectures) and this group 
will shortly be going to the area of Tambov and Voronezh gubernias 

X 

with our representative. We have asked all Soviets,* Bolshevik com- 
mittees and trade unions to give us reliable people. 

Tsyurupa: 

x Are the factory committees, at least those of the big 
plants, included here? This is important. 

Written on June 7, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



* Underlined by Lenin.— Ed. 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA. JUNE 10, 1918 



101 



101 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

7. VI. 1918 

Comrade Tsyurupa or his deputy 
Comrade Tsyurupa, 

I am sending to you representatives of the Vyshny 
Volochok Soviet. 

The famine there is appalling. It is urgently necessary 
to help by every means and to give at least something im- 
mediately 

I have already talked with these comrades about forming 
detachments and on the tasks of the food work, but you, too, 
should have a talk with them. 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



102 

TO A. P. SMIRNOV 

Comrade Smirnov, 

The bearers are interested in the question of elections 
to the Soviets. I have told them that they always have the 
right to recall their representatives. 

Tell them of your experience and give them directives. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



103 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

10. VI. 191 

Comrade Tsyurupa or his deputy 

The bearers are comrades from the Maltsev factories 
(about 20,000 workers, about 100,000 in their district). 
The food situation is catastrophic. 



102 



V. I. LENIN 



Please hear them out and 

(1) take urgent measures to help them at once, at least 
to a minimum extent, but help immediately; 

(2) draw representatives of the Maltsev district into the 
Narrow Food Council; 

(3) make efforts to organise detachments of the Maltsev 
workers. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



104 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

11. VI. 1918 

Comrade Tsyurupa or his deputy 

Comrade Tsyurupa, 

The bearers are representatives of a Bryansk factory. 
Since yesterday you (or Comrade Svidersky) arrived at a 
good understanding with the Maltsev workers, I am sure you 
will do so, too, with those from Bryansk. I ask you most 
earnestly to receive them at once and do everything pos- 
sible. 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



105 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I do not remember giving permission for contacts with 
Omsk. 



ADDITION TO TELEGRAM TO A. S. YAKUBOV, ETC. JUNE 11, 1918 103 



I shall make inquiries of Podbelsky. 

I advise you to make no transactions, direct or indirect, 
with the Omsk counter-revolutionaries. 70 

Lenin 

Written on June 11, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



106 

ADDITION TO THE TELEGRAM TO A. S. YAKUBOV, 
J. V. STALIN AND A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV 

Top priority 
Telegram on food 

1) Yakubov 

2) Stalin 

3) Shlyapnikov 

Extraordinary Regional Food Committee 
Tsaritsyn 

In view of the events in Samara and Omsk, the interruption of 
railway traffic between Perm and Vyatka and the complete uncer- 
tainty as to the transport situation on the Perm-Ekaterinburg- 
Tyumen line, which have completely cut off Siberia, without waiting 
for your consent I am sending by water route the technical workers 
from Vyatka and Ufa gubernias about whom I informed you in tele- 
gram 363. Please receive them and put them to work immediately by 
distributing them among the places of grain procurement and, if nec- 
essary, among the places along the routes for dispatching and for- 
warding grain. Among those being sent are top-level people absolute- 
ly suitable for technical work in the centre and in the Extraordin- 
ary Regional Food Committee, and efficient organisers for grain 
collecting in the localities. To use these people, for whose honesty 
I am ready to vouch, is essential and inevitable, since no greater and 
better technical forces are to be found. Offer them to fix the rate of 
their remuneration themselves and, although I am sure of their being 
sufficiently modest, I recommend you not to stint payment for their 
work. Telegraph me. 

Tsyurupa 
People's Commissar for Food 

I urgently advise you to receive the people sent by Tsyu- 
rupa and put them to work, since he vouches for them. 



104 



V. I. LENIN 



It is extremely important to make use of experienced, 
honest practical workers. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on June 11, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

107 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

11. VI. 1918 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I urgently advise you to take advantage of the present 
moment to step up dispatch of the greatest possible number 
of detachments to the Urals via Vyatka. Tsyurupa agrees. 
There are arms in Vologda. 

Lenin 

Transmit at once to Petrograd and inform me when 
received in Petrograd. 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

108 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I hope you received my request to send more detachments 
to the Urals. I add that it is extremely important to send 
there more workers for agitation and guidance of the back- 
ward. Reply immediately. 

Lenin 

Written on June 14, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA. JUNE 17, 1918 



105 



109 

TO THE COMMISSARIATS FOR EDUCATION 
AND PROPERTIES OF THE REPUBLIC 

You are directed to submit information without delay 
as to what exactly has been done to implement the decree 
of 13. IV. 1918, particularly in regard to 1) the removal 
of old monuments, 2) their replacement by new monuments, 
at least temporary ones, and 3) the replacement of old 
inscriptions on public buildings by new ones (§5 of the 
decree). 71 

The two months' procrastination in carrying out the 
decree — important both as propaganda and as providing 
work to the unemployed — is unpardonable. 

Chairman, C.P.C.* 

Written on June 15, 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



110 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

1 

Tsyurupa 

I very much fear that we underestimate the "Penza" 
danger both as regards food and in a general political re- 
spect, and that in fact we shall not be able to send 
"agitators". 

Should we not adopt urgent measures to take a good food 
detachment (of Petrograd workers or the like) and get it 
moving at once, impressing upon them the task: for the 
first few weeks you will act as agitators. 

* There is a typewritten text of this document on C.P.C. note- 
paper, signed by Lenin, which was sent to the People's Commissariat 
for Education. — Ed. 



106 



V. I. LENIN 



2 

Tsyurupa 

I think it necessary that you most urgently get in 
touch 

1) with Petrograd 

2) with Sverdlov 

concerning the dispatch to Penza and Penza Gubernia of 
some 50 people (agitators) from among Petrograd and Mos- 
cow workers. 

Written on June 17, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

111 

TO N. P. GORBUNOV 

Gorbunov 

Tell Minkin that Syzran has been taken by the Czechs. 72 
But we must not give way to panic. Our forces are prepar- 
ing to hit back. The Penza people, too, should prepare 
firmly and energetically. Our success is assured if we do 
not remain inactive. 

Written on June 18, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

112 

TO A. A. JOFFE 

18/VI. 

Comrade Joffe, 

I am extremely astonished and angry at the absence 
of news from Switzerland. I am told that couriers travel 
there weekly. Yet not a word! 

What are Berzin and Shklovsky doing? 

Please forward this letter to them and take measures to 
receive a reply. 

It is urgently necessary to have sent here from Switzer- 
land 

Junius's pamphlet, 



TELEGRAM TO S. G. SHAHUMYAN. JUNE 18, 1918 



107 



Karl Liebknecht's pamphlet, 

a set of cuttings from Berner Tagwacht and other pu- 
blications (all documents on the movement of the Lefts in 
Germany and Austria). 73 

This must be republished immediately in book form 
(separate issues) in Switzerland. 

Commission someone in Germany (in Berlin) to do the 
same job, using the materials of the Partei-Archiv or of 
any library having complete sets of newspapers for the 
war years (Riihle's article on the split in Vorwarts, 
12. I. 1915 or 1916, 74 etc.). 

Referenten-Material from Niederbarnim (quoted in 
Legien's pamphlet: Warum miissen die Gewerkschaftsfiihrer, 
u.s.w.) 15 and everything of this kind to be collected imme- 
diately. 

It's really scandalous that nothing is being done in this 
field. 

For this work two Germans (Borchardt would be suitable) 
and two Swiss can (and should) be hired, and it should be 
published immediately in German, French and English. 

Lenin 

Regarding the ships in Novorossiisk the matter has not 
yet been fully cleared up. But we have taken all measures 
and I hope the order will be carried out. 76 

Written on June 18, 1918 
Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



113 

TELEGRAM TO S. G. SHAHUMYAN 

Shahumyan 
Baku 

Via Astrakhan and Kushka, to be transmitted 
by radio-telegraph 

So far there has been no decree on nationalisation of 
the oil industry. 77 We intend decreeing nationalisation of 



108 



V. I. LENIN 



the oil industry towards the close of the navigational sea- 
son. For the time being we are organising a state monopoly 
of trade in oil products. Take all measures for the speediest 
shipment of oil products to the Volga. Report daily to the 
Chief Oil Committee on the position of the oil industry. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on June 18, 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV of the telegraph 

form signed by Lenin 



114 

TO I. E. GUKOVSKY 

We have decided to rob all the commissariats in order 
urgently to strengthen the Commissariat for Food, at least 
for 2 or 3 months, as otherwise we may starve to death. 

From you we want to take Zax. 

Written on June 22, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



115 

TO THE SECRETARIAT OF THE C.P.C. 

1 

1) Find the decision passed a long time ago (in Petro- 
grad) on how to put questions on the agenda. 

2) The compiler of the agenda, the secretary (Gorbunov 
is the secretary, isn't he? what a mishmash we have here), 
should sign at the bottom: compiled by secretary so-and-so 
(and I give warning that / shall dismiss secretaries who 
are unwilling to observe the rules). 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA. JUNE 26, 1918 109 



Reminder 

to all secretaries, that they should not put questions on 
the agenda without first demanding from the reporter (or from 
the person introducing the question) a signed statement 

1) whether inquiries have been made of the finance de- 
partment (Commissariat for Finance + Control), if it is a 
matter of expenditure or allocations; 

2) whether inquiries have been made of the departments 
concerned in the given question. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



All secretaries must sign 
here that they have read this. 

Written on June 26, 1918 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



Printed from the original 



116 

EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH A. D. TSYURUPA 

Tsyurupa 

1) Who and when are you sending to the local areas 
(Schlichter, Bryukhanov, who else? and where to?)? 

2) We've had a talk with Pravdin (he arrived today 
from Tula, Yelets, Orel). 

There is grain, 
exemplary order, 

power in the hands of the poor peasants. 

3) Who are you sending to Tambov and with what detach- 
ments? Should not Bryukhanov be sent there? The most 
energetic person is needed there. 

(Today I had a talk with people from Tambov; the har- 
vest is unprecedented; there is also old grain; the kulaks 
can be brought to heel, but there is a lack of organisers 
and detachments.) 

4) Are we going to put up with the absence of a (food) 
dictatorship in Moscow? It's a scandal! A disgrace! 



110 



V. I. LENIN 



Schlichter is going to Yefremov Uyezd, Tula Gubernia. I sent a 
comrade to Zinoviev in Petrograd for workers for his detachment. 
Urgent loading of goods is in progress at present. In about 5 days' 

time he will set out.* 

A. Ts. 

Tsyurupa 

Five days for an exchange of telegrams with Zinoviev 
(who long ago was asking where to send detachments) and 
for loading the goods (1 day??). 

This is monstrous red tape. Appoint ten officials — 
scoundrels from the Food Commissariat — and demand that 
everything be done in 1 day or in 2 days, otherwise dis- 
missal and prosecution. 

Written on June 26, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

117 

TO A. P. SMIRNOV, G. I. PETROVSKY 
AND I. E. GUKOVSKY 

28/VI. 1918 

Comrade Smirnov 

or Petrovsky, People's Commissar for Internal Affairs, 
and Comrade Gukovsky, People's Commissar for Finance 

I strongly recommend the bearer, Comrade Semyon 
Ivanovich Lebedev, Chairman of the Temnikov Soviet, 
Tambov Gubernia. 

He asks for a loan of l x h million. From his account 
it is evident that affairs in the uyezd are exemplary. A 
most instructive example of a model uyezd where the kulaks 
have in actual fact been ousted from all the Soviets. In 
my opinion, such an uyezd should be given priority 
assistance. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



* Underlined by Lenin.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN. JUNE-JULY 1918 



111 



118 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Secret 

People's Commissar Stalin 
Tsaritsyn 

Today, June 30, information was received from Joffe in 
Berlin that Ktihlmann had a preliminary conversation with 
Joffe. From this conversation it is evident that the Ger- 
mans agree to compel the Turks to cease hostilities beyond 
the Brest frontier, having established a precise demarca- 
tion line for us. They promise not to allow the Turks into 
Baku, but they want to receive oil. Joffe has replied that 
we shall adhere strictly to Brest, but quite agree with the 
principle of give and take. Pay the greatest attention to 
this information and try to pass it on as soon as possible 
to Shahumyan, for now there are very serious chances of 
holding on to Baku. Some oil, of course, we shall give. 

Lenin 

Written on June 30, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI of the telegraph tape 

119 

TELEGRAM TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN 

Panyushkin, Military Commissar Extraordinary 
Novosil 

I shall pass your request on to the Extraordinary Com- 
mission, but ask you to act firmly after first strictly cal- 
culating and weighing up the forces, for the matter must 
be carried through from start to finish. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written at the end of June- 
not later than July 2, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



112 



V. I. LENIN 



120 

TO A. A. JOFFE 

1 VII. 1918 

Dear Comrade Joffe, 

I am, to tell the truth, extremely angry with you. We are 
short-handed, everyone is devilishly overworked, yet you 
go and do a thing like this: you write a lot on business 
matters in a personal letter to me (the last one, in 
pencil) and insert a number of personal thrusts, attacks, 
pinpricks and so on against Chicherin ("not a real" m-r* 
and so on). To Chicherin, on the other hand, you write: 
"prospects in the letter to Lenin". 

Damn it, it's the frozen limit! 

Chicherin, naturally, asks me for the letter, and I can't 
show it, because I don't want to be an instrument of squab- 
ble. The result is that the work suffers and relations suffer. 

Chicherin is a splendid worker, most conscientious, 
shrewd, knowledgeable. Such people should be highly 
appreciated. That his failing is lack of "commandership" 
does not matter. There are plenty of people in this world 
who have the opposite failing! 

Chicherin is a man you can work with, he is easy to work 
with, but the work can be spoiled even with him. 

You find fault with him, but the Commissariat for For- 
eign Affairs has a right to complain of you, too, because 
you do not reckon with him, and without the knowledge 
and permission of the People's Commissar for Foreign 
Affairs, ambassadors are not, of course, entitled to take 
decisive steps. 

I hope you will take all measures to eliminate these 
MiBstande.** 

That you have got Krasin "on the move" is very good. 
Keep on at Shklovsky with all your might; he is a lazy- 
bones; demand reports and more reports, use threats. 

All the best, 

Lenin 

Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Apparently "minister". — Ed. 
Shortcomings.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO D. Y. IVASHCHENKO. JULY 4, 1918 



113 



121 

TELEGRAM TO L. B. KRASIN 



Secret 



Personal from Lenin to Krasin 
Russian Embassy, Berlin 

I fully appreciate Joffe's work and certainly approve 
it, but I emphatically demand that Joffe should behave as 
an ambassador whose superior is the People's Commissar 
for Foreign Affairs, and should observe the decencies, not 
abusing and not slighting other people, and consulting 
the People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs on all important 
matters. Only then can I and will I support Ambassador 
Joffe. I rely on your tact to impress this upon Ambassador 
Joffe, and await a reply. 



Ivashchenko, Commissar of Orsha Station 
Orsha 

Thank you for letting through 36 waggons to Germany: 
they are for our needy prisoners of war. Please refute all 
the foul slanders and remember that we should do all we 
can to help our prisoners of war. 



Lenin 



Written on July 3, 1918 

First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from the original 



122 

TELEGRAM TO D. Y. IVASHCHENKO 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on July 4, 1918 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



Printed from the original 



114 



V. I. LENIN 



123 

REPLY BY DIRECT LINE TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN 78 

Lenin replies: 

Kolegayev told me personally as well as Zinoviev and 
many others, that he, Kolegayev, is opposed to the present 
policy of the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party. I do not 
doubt that the crazily hysterical and provocative adventure 
culminating in the murder of Mirbach and revolt of the 
Central Committee of the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries 
against the Soviet power will lose them not only the major- 
ity of their workers and peasants, but also many intellec- 
tuals. The revolt was suppressed completely in a single 
day. Hundreds of people have been arrested. 

Put on record Muravyov's declaration of his withdrawal 
from the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party, and continue 
to keep him under vigilant control. I am confident that if 
these conditions are observed we shall fully succeed in 
utilising his excellent fighting qualities. The struggle 
against the Czechoslovaks and Cossacks must be waged 
with treble energy. 

Lenin 



Written on July 7, 1918 
Transmitted to Kazan 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



124 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. NATSARENUS 

Natsarenus, Commissar Extraordinary 
Petrozavodsk 

You are charged with the following duties: 

1. To take all measures for the thorough destruction of 
the railway line over the greatest possible distance. 

2. Foreigners directly or indirectly assisting the pred- 
atory campaign of the Anglo-French imperialists to be 
arrested, in case of resistance — to be shot. 



TO I. E. GUKOVSKY. JULY 11, 1918 



115 



3. Citizens of the Soviet Republic directly or indirectly 
assisting in imperialist plunder — to be shot. 

Two million rubles are being remitted and put at your 
disposal. You will be informed separately about the mil- 
itary aid to be sent to you.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on July 7, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in an unknown hand, 

added to and signed by 
Lenin 



125 

TO I. E. GUKOVSKY 79 
1 

Gukovsky 

There are several complaints that you (your Commissar- 
iat) have still not given the assignments: 

fl) full text, \ 

1 2) inscriptions in all languages, etc. J 

Regarding the design of the new money. 

I have already ordered this from Zax. It is a mere trifle, 
really. 

Do it or have it done tomorrow morning. 

2 

You are sabotaging, really! Now, what is so important 
here? After all, it is not final. It is ridiculous to consider 
this important. 

Written on July 11, 1918 

First published: the first Printed from the original 

document in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV, 
the second in 1965 in 
Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

* The last sentence of the telegram is in Lenin's handwriting. — 
Ed. 



116 



V. I. LENIN 



126 

TO I. E. GUKOVSKY 
1 

There are complaints that you have still not given the 
text for the new money, thus making it difficult to prepare 
the models and test them. Give it immediately, retaining 
the old text about being exchangeable for gold (the ex- 
change will be suspended by separate decrees). 

2 

Make a Soviet inscription. 

3 

1) Give available models to the best experts. 

2) Order counterfeit. 

3) Order designs (of all denominations) from the Board 
of the People's Commissariat for Education. 

4) Have Popovitsky draw up an estimate: 

(a) how many such bank-notes can be produced in one 
month with the usual, i.e., the normal, assortment of de- 
nominations 

(a^J on the Orlov machines, 

(a 2 ) on the ordinary flat-bed machines, 

(a 3 ) high denomination notes (i.e., notes of high value) 

on Orlov machines, low denomination notes on 

ordinary flat-bed machines? 

(b) what is the value of the new bank-notes compared 
with the old? 

(c) when precisely will it be possible to make the cliches 
(that is, how many days after the design is endorsed) 
and how long before beginning to produce the new bank- 
notes? 

(d) will the new method require new materials and aux- 
iliary substances, etc., as compared with the old? 

What will be the cost of forms (for all official papers 
of Soviet authorities)? 

Written in the first half 
of July 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



TO N. I. PODVOISKY. JULY 16, 1918 



117 



127 

TELEGRAM TO THE VORONEZH GUBERNIA 
MILITARY COMMISSAR 

Gubernia Military Commissar 
Voronezh 

I read your note to Trotsky. He and I fully agree that 
the telegram from Saratov is trustworthy and should be 
promulgated, for it comes from people who sincerely con- 
demn the adventure of the Central Committee of the Left 
Socialist-Revolutionaries. 80 

Lenin 

Written on July 12, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



128 

TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT 
FOR NAVAL AFFAIRS 

Will you please take all measures to speed up delivery 
to the Caspian Sea of naval vessels of all suitable types. 81 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

Written on July 13, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



129 

TO N. I. PODVOISKY 

Podvoisky 

Why have you not sent from Kursk 4 regiments + Asarkh's 
regiment (?) 

+ Sluvis's division? 



118 



V. I. LENIN 



Delay is disastrous for us on the Czechoslovak front, 
and you are late! 82 

Written on July 16, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

130 

TELEGRAM TO THE PERM SOVIET 

17. VII. 1918 

Soviet of Deputies 
Perm 

Copy to Smilga, C.C. member 

I have received a complaint from Stanislaw Palinski, 
an old Polish revolutionary who is recommended by Stek- 
lov. Palinski has been arrested at the Berezniki soda works, 
Verkhstiya post-station, Perm Gubernia, on a charge of 
counter-revolutionary activity and sympathy for the Cze- 
choslovaks. 

Palinski writes that the Legal Commission of the Usolye 
Uyezd Soviet found nothing criminal in his actions. 

I urgently request you to carry out a strict check and 
impartial examination of the matter, and allow Palinski 
passage to Poland. 

Telegraph execution. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 

131 

TELEGRAM TO F. I. KOLESOV 

17. VII. 1918 
Kolesov, Chairman of the Council of People's 
Commissars of the Turkestan Republic 
Tashkent 

We are taking all possible steps to assist you. We are 
sending a regiment. 



TO S. P. SEREDA. JULY 19, 1918 



119 



We are taking energetic measures against the Czechoslo- 
vaks and do not doubt that we shall crush them. Do not 
despair, try your utmost to make permanent and stable 
contact with Krasnovodsk and Baku. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Volzhsky Den (Samara) Printed from the original 

No. 29, July 20, 1918 

132 

TO N. I. PODVOISKY 

Podvoisky 

I did not reply to the second telegram because such 
an appointment does not depend on me, and in general 
it is hardly possible, as it upsets the whole order of 
things. 83 

The Czechoslovak (and kulak) danger is so grave that 
I think you ought to make (and Trotsky will probably 
agree) a tour of the Western and Southern (German) fronts, 
etc., to speed up the transference of troops from there to 
the Czechoslovak front. 

Written on July 19, 1918 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

133 

TO S. P. SEREDA 

19. VII. 1918 

Comrade Sereda,* 

The bearers are members of the Land Department of the 
Moscow Gubernia Soviet. Please receive them — the matter 



* At the top of the document Lenin wrote: "(also for Comrade 
Bryukhanov)" . — Ed. 



120 



V. I. LENIN 



is an important one. I think the "state farms" and the 
communes should be merged. Practical measures for assi- 
stance and control should be discussed. Try to help with 
tractors. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

P.S. Discuss whether a decree of the C.P.C. is needed for 
Moscow Gubernia. Please make haste. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



134 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. NATSARENUS 

Natsarenus, Military Commissar Extraordinary 
Petrozavodsk 

I am passing your telegram on to the Commissariat for 
Food. The food situation now is as bad as it can be. We shall 
hardly be able to help. Everything that is best and most 
reliable has to be organised for sending detachments to 
the Czechoslovak front. Without victory over the Czecho- 
slovaks there will be no grain. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on July 24, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



135 

TO Y. LARIN 

Comrade Larin, 

It is necessary to write a short pamphlet (30-40 small- 
sized pages) on the composition and activities of the Su- 
preme Economic Council. 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA. JULY 1918 



121 



This is of extreme importance both for Europe and for 
the peasants. 

Describe clearly and simply, giving facts: 
(a) the participation of workers' organisations, 
((3) the communist (Marxist), not syndicalist, nature of 
the structure (i.e., of the new socialist system, order), 

(y) subjection (i.e., smashing the resistance) of the cap- 
italists, 

(8) the successes achieved in practice (we have taken 
stock of all textiles: figures), 5-10 of the best examples, 
etc. 

(s) What still remains to be done? 
(yj) The new role of the trade unions: 
(aa) their growth, 

((3(3) their membership at the present time, 
(yy) their role: they run production. 
(6) The number of nationalised enterprises, etc. 84 

Lenin 

Written at the end of July- 
beginning of August 1918 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



136 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

Comrade Tsyurupa, 

You look ill. Without loss of time, take two months' 
holiday. If you do not promise this definitely, I shall com- 
plain to the Central Committee. 

Lenin 

Written in July 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



122 



V. I. LENIN 



137 

TO P. A. KOBOZEV, K. KH. DANISHEVSKY, 
K. A. MEKHONOSHIN, F. F. RASKOLNIKOV* 

1. VIII. 1918 
Comrades Kobozev, Danishevsky, Mekhonoshin 
and Raskolnikov 

Comrades, 

I take this opportunity to send you a few words by mes- 
senger. 

Are the army commanders and Vatsetis working vigor- 
ously enough? Is the commissars' control over them good 
enough? 

What are the opinions about Blokhin? Is it true that 
he is splendid? If so, is he being given enough scope? 

Of course, I am judging from a distance and can easily 
be mistaken. But I am afraid lest the "staffs" should smoth- 
er the live work below, the work of the masses? Is there 
sufficient contact in the military field with the masses 
of poor peasants? 

Is everything being done to rouse them and draw them 
into the work? 

Now the entire fate of the revolution rests on one card: 
swift victory over the Czechoslovaks on the Kazan-Urals- 
Samara front. 

Everything depends on this. 

Is the command sufficiently energetic? Is the offensive 
sufficiently vigorous? 

Please reply, if only in a few words, both by telegraph 
and by messenger. 

Regards, 

Lenin 

First published in 1934 Printed from the original 

in the journal 
Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 3 



* On the envelope of the letter Lenin wrote: "Comrades Kobo- 
zev, Danishevsky, Mekhonoshin and Raskolnikov. Headquarters of 
the Commander-in-Chief in Kazan (From Lenin)." — Ed. 



TO J. A. BERZIN. AUGUST 3, 1918 



123 



138 

TO A. A. JOFFE 

3. VIII. 1918 

Comrade Joffe 

Everything you write in your recent letters is the height 
of absurdity. 

To pursue the "former" policy of not breaking with the 
Entente after the Onega events is ludicrous. 85 You can't 
restore chastity to a dame with a baby. 

It is also absurd to apply the term intervention or aid 
to the fact that we are continuing to manoeuvre, allowing 
the Germans to take what the Entente has already taken, 
thereby making more difficult and delaying the Anglo- 
American-Japanese throttling of Russia. 

Without knowing the facts and without reflecting on 
them, you have fallen into error with the memorandum 
and the rest. If you wish to insist on it, hand in your resigna- 
tion to the C.C. Until you do so, until the C.C. has accepted 
your resignation, until a substitute has been sent to you, 
and until his arrival, you, of course, as a Party member 
(as you yourself write) will do your duty. 

Gruss, 

Lenin 

Written on August 3, 1918 
Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



139 

TO J. A. BERZIN 

3. VIII. 1918 

Comrade Berzin, 

The bearers are Italian prisoners of war, who have pre- 
sented to us a recommendation from the Chairman of the 
Ufa Soviet. I have seen them twice and have received a 
very pleasant impression from my talk with them. It is 



124 



V. I. LENIN 



necessary to exercise the maximum caution and help them 
in every way to organise work and publications among 
Italians, in the Italian language. 
Thanks for the letters. 

You are evidently working hard. Greetings! 

For God's sake, do not grudge money for publications 
(in German, French, Italian and English) and be quick, be 
quick. 

It is a critical moment here: the struggle against the 
British and Czechoslovaks, and the kulaks. The fate of the 
revolution is being decided. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to Berne 

First published in part Printed from the original 

on January 21, 1925, 
in Pravda No. 17 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

140 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA AND V. L. PANYUSHKIN 

Comrades Tsyurupa and Panyushkin 

From Panyushkin's report it is evident that he is work- 
ing splendidly, but is incredibly squandering his energies, 
taking on a hundred things at once. 

This is impermissible. 

Panyushkin must be given a strictly defined, precise 
assignment, laid down in writing 

(1) to seize and requisition all grain surpluses from the 
kulaks and the rich of the whole Tula Gubernia; 

(2) to dispatch all this grain immediately to Moscow; 

(3) no other job whatsoever to be undertaken until this 
assignment has been completely fulfilled. 

For carrying out the work use as many motor-lorries as 
possible. 

Written in the summer, 
prior to August 5, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



TO BRYUKHANOV AND OTHERS. FOOD COMMISSARIAT BOARD 125 



141 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

Tsyurupa 

Every effort must be made now so that in actual fact 
both decrees (on harvesting detachments and on collective 
trains) 

are merged in practice and provide us with our detach- 
ments. 86 

What is being done in this direction? 

1) Instruction: in the collective trains a certain propor- 
tion in each (1 in 5, for example) should be from the trade 
unions, 

2) §7 of the decree on collective trains should be devel- 
oped and strengthened, 

3) their correlation (in effect = /ie/p) with the requisition- 
ing detachments.... 

4) Assign them all to a maximum of 2 uyezds (from among 
the best) and sweep these clean. 

Written on August 8, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

142 

TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV AND OTHER MEMBERS 
OF THE BOARD OF THE FOOD COMMISSARIAT 

Bryukhanov and other members of the Board 
of the Food Commissariat 

I gather from your note that the Food Commissariat 
understands and applies the decrees incorrectly. 

"No special desire is noticeable among the workers ..." 
(to join harvesting detachments). 

Where are the proofs? Where is the appeal of the Food 
Commissariat? What is the date of it? 

In which factories was it distributed? When and in how 
many copies? 

I am afraid the Food Commissariat did none of these 
things (judging by Comrade Bryukhanov's silence), but 
occupied itself with the devil knows what bureaucratic 



126 



V. I. LENIN 



red tape. For without the help of the workers the Food Com- 
missariat is nil. 

Nothing bad is to be seen from the quotation (from Nev- 
sky's telegram of 8. VIII), for it does not touch on the 
question of % of trade union members, or of the leading 
organisation, or of participation and harvesting (§7 of the 
decree on collective trains), i.e., the business questions 
are not dealt with. 

What's bad about Nevsky's telegram besides the good? 
Nevsky calls on the workers: go out and help (he says noth- 
ing about conditions, but we indicated these conditions 
and indicated good ones). But the Food Commissariat cavils 
at a word (when there's nothing to cavil at) ... and itself 
does nothing! 

Either we rouse the mass of the workers to join in a se- 
rious movement for grain (and for crushing the kulaks) — 
this the Food Commissariat does not do 

— or else, no Food Commissariat at all is needed. 

Written in August, 
after 8, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

143 

TELEGRAM TO A. D. METELEV 87 

9/VIII. 

Metelev 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Vologda 

Copy to Sammer and Eliava 

There is no need to come to Moscow to report. You must 
remain in Vologda and strain all efforts for immediate, 
relentless reprisals against the whiteguards, who are clearly 
planning treachery in Vologda, and for preparations for 
defence. 

Refute the lie about Archangel by letter. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on August 9, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA. AUGUST 10, 1918 



127 



144 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

10/VIII— 18 

1 

Tsyurupa: 

(1) It is a great scandal, an outrageous scandal, that 
there is grain in Saratov and we cannot get it away!! What 
about having one or two food officials sent to each railway 
junction? What more can be done? 

(2) Draft of a decree — 25-30 hostages from among the rich 
in each grain-producing volost, answering with their lives 
for the collection and delivery of all surpluses. 

(3) Instruct Popov urgently to make up delivery orders 
by volosts. That is, how much surplus grain there should 
be in each volost. How much should each give? 

2 

Tsyurupa 

1) You have not replied about "hostages". 

2) When will Popov finish his work? (He must be given 
a short time limit.) 

3 

I propose that "hostages" should not be taken but des- 
ignated by name for each volost. 

The purpose of designating them: it is the rich peasants 
who, in the same way as they answer for contribution, 
will answer with their lives for the prompt collection and 
delivery of grain surpluses. 

An instruction to this effect (to designate "hostages") 
to be given 

(a) to the Poor Peasants' Committees, 
((3) to all food detachments. 
Force? Just now in the front-line area, there will be a 
force. 88 

Written on August 10, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



128 



V. I. LENIN 



145 

TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL 

Top secret 
August 10, 1918 

M. D. Bonch-Bruyevich, personal 

I consider it essential to reinforce the Eastern Front 
to the utmost. I direct the Supreme Military Council to 
draw up a plan for the withdrawal of the greatest possible 
number of units from the Western Front. This plan should 
be carried out in the shortest possible time. All battle- 
worthy units should go. The railways will receive orders 
to let through without delay all units already going to the 
front, and will make every preparation for handling new ones. 

I direct the Supreme Military Council to supervise the 
accuracy and speed with which the railways fulfil the 
orders. The Chairman of the Supreme Military Council to 
report to me about delays. 

I place responsibility for the speediest fulfilment of the 
plan on the Supreme Military Council. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published (in facsimile) Printed from the text 

in 1930 in the book: in Sklyansky's handwriting 

Grazhdanskaya voina. 1918-1921 and signed by Lenin 

(The Civil War 
1918-1921), Vol. Ill 



146 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. NATSARENUS 

11. VIII. 1918 
Natsarenus, Military Commissar Extraordinary 
Petrozavodsk 

I am very glad that you are energetically dispelling the 
doubts of Trotsky and myself, caused by the wholesale 
departures from the fronts.* Send by a very reliable per- 

*See Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, Document 252.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO A. Y. MINKIN. AUGUST 12, 1918 



129 



son detailed information on the number, disposition and 
morale of the troops. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



147 

TELEGRAM TO THE VOLOGDA GUBERNIA 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

11. VIII. 1918 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Vologda 

Copy to Kedrov 

It is essential immediately to mobilise the bourgeoisie 
for trench digging, and in general to push forward fortifica- 
tion work with the maximum energy. Telegraph fulfilment. 
Send by a very reliable person detailed information and 
reports on the progress of this urgent work. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published (in facsimile) Printed from the original 

in 1930 in Grazhdanskaya 
voina. 1918-1921, Vol. Ill 



148 

TELEGRAM TO A. Y. MINKIN 

Minkin 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Penza 

I received your telegram on the suppression of the kulak 
revolt. One must strike while the iron is hot, and for this 
purpose utilise the suppression of the kulaks for ruthlessly 



130 



V. I. LENIN 



suppressing grain-profiteers everywhere, for confiscating 
grain from the big rich, and for mass mobilisation of the poor 
peasants who are being provided with grain. Telegraph 
fulfilment. The power of the poor peasants in the front-line 
area must be reinforced and made good. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on August 12, 1918 

First published (in facsimile) Printed from the original 

in 1930 in Grazhdanskaya voina. 
1918-1921, Vol. Ill 



149 

TELEGRAM TO D. T. PETRUCHUK 89 

Orsha 

In case of need you will be given permission to use the 
direct line. My advice is: gradually take steps towards 
disarming and expelling demoralised units and hooligan 
elements. For this highly important work, take members 
of the local Executive Committee and Regional Committee 
to assist you, for this is a matter of paramount state impor- 
tance. Inform local Executive Committees and Party Com- 
mittees of this telegram. 

Written on August 15, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



150 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

Can it be arranged for detachments to go out for grain 
(to procure and transport by express goods train) according 
to alternative instructions, namely: 

either for one time (to one volost, etc., for threshing 
in a uyezd, etc.) — then the bonus will be less, 



TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. AUGUST 16, 1918 



131 



or undertaking to work for a lengthy period (not one 
time, but for 3 or 4 months, etc., or once more when called 
upon by the Commissariat for Food, etc.) — and then the 
bonus will be higher. 

(In both cases make it a condition that they are obliged 
not only to procure but also to thresh, and to carry the grain 
into barns, and to erect barns or half-sheds, etc.) 

Written in the first half 
of August 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



151 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

Top secret 

16. VIII. 1918 

Comrade Sklyansky 

I am enclosing herewith Comrade Vorovsky's letter, with 
documents attached to it (registered in the Managing De- 
partment of the C.P.C. 16. VIII. 1918 as No. 2509), and 
I ask you to pay the most serious attention to the abuse and 
crime revealed here. 90 

It is necessary to appoint a very limited number of the 
most reliable and experienced comrades (if possible, not 
more than two or three), including one from the Extraor- 
dinary Commission, to carry out through such a secret com- 
mission of inquiry the strictest investigation, at first in 
absolute secrecy, in order (1) to discover the usual manner 
in which business is conducted in the institution concerned, 
(2) to trace the connections of the counter-revolutionary 
criminals and (3) to arrest all of them, allowing none to 
escape. 

Report to me regularly on fulfilment. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



132 



V. I. LENIN 



152 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA 

16. VIII. 1918 

Sereda, People's Commissar 
Yelets 

It is extremely important to organise things in such 
a way that all grain surpluses without exception are col- 
lected and dispatched in one volost after another. Do not 
grudge machines and bonuses for exemplary volosts. In- 
form us of the total amount of surpluses and which volost 
will prove to be the first to collect all surpluses in full. 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



153 

TELEGRAM TO S. V. MALYSHEV 91 

17. VIII. 1918 

Sergei Malyshev 

Ekaterinograd (Ekaterinenstadt), Samara Gubernia 

Congratulations on success. Telegraph urgently and re- 
gularly how much has been collected and delivered to Sa- 
ratov, and when. It is particularly important not to attempt 
too many things at once, but to collect in full all grain 
surpluses first from one volost and to give it a huge bonus. 
Telegraph fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Published in part on 
September 18, 1918, in 
Saratovskaya Krasnaya Gazeta 
No. 164 



First published in 1931 
in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA. AUGUST 19, 1918 



133 



154 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO N. I. MURALOV 

Sereda urgently demands 200 poods of petrol for deliv- 
ery of grain in Yelets Uyezd. Do not forget that grain is 
the chief and vital problem. Everything must be done. 
Reply immediately when precisely you will send the 200 
poods of petrol to Sereda (Sereda, People's Commissar for 
Agriculture, Yelets). 

Lenin 

Written not earlier 
than August 17 
and not later 
than August 19, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

155 

TELEGRAM TO F. E. RASKOLNIKOV 

Gubernia Executive Committee for Raskolnikov 
Nizhni-Novgorod 

Pay thrice-heightened attention to ensuring supplies for 
the Kazan Front, to accelerated dispatch there of reserves, 
and see to it that the struggle against the whiteguards in 
Nizhni-Novgorod is begun without delay and carried out 
with absolute firmness. See especially to the safeguarding 
of artillery property, telegraph fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Written on August 19, 1918 

First published in 1934 Printed from the original 

in Proletarskaya Revolutsia 
No. 3 

156 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA 

19. VIII. 1918 

Sereda, People's Commissar for Agriculture 
Yelets 

A 500-pood tank-car of petrol is being dispatched to 
you today, but why do you evade the very important ques- 



134 



V. I. LENIN 



tions: how much grain has been collected, how much deliv- 
ered? Further, it is absolutely essential to sweep clean of all 
grain surpluses first one volost, and to give that volost a 
big bonus. We shall not grudge money to help the poor 
and middle peasants, if they are helping the hungry. 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



157 

TELEGRAM TO A. Y. MINKIN 



Minkin 

It is stupid to ask whether a People's Commissar for 
Finance, and one of a single region at that, can counter- 
mand my order. If that order is not carried out, I shall have 
the guilty persons prosecuted. Leave the company of Letts 
in Penza for the time being until the suppression in, Chem- 
bar. Tell all members of the Executive Committee and all 
Communists that it is their duty ruthlessly to suppress 
the kulaks and to confiscate all the grain of the insurgents. 
Your inactivity and weakness is exasperating. I demand 
detailed reports on the fulfilment of all my orders and es- 
pecially on the measures of suppression and confiscation.* 



Lenin 



Written on August 19, 1918 
Sent to Penza 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



* Transmitted by direct line.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. AUGUST 19, 1918 



135 



158 

TELEGRAM TO THE PENZA GUBERNIA 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

19. VIII. 1918 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Penza 

Copy to the Gubernia Committee of the Communists 

I am extremely indignant that there has been absolutely 
nothing definite from you as to what serious measures have 
at last been carried out by you for ruthless suppression 
of the kulaks of five volosts and confiscation of their grain. 
Your inactivity is criminal. All efforts should be concen- 
trated on a single volost which should be swept clean of 
all grain surpluses. Telegraph fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



159 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Secret 

Trotsky 

Sviyazhsk 

Copy to Vatsetis 

Regarding your military proposals about forming detach- 
ments of instructors, let the military themselves decide this, 
I am no judge. I only know of the special need of having 
our own instructors for the workers' army in view of the 
complete unreliability of the officers. As regards a monetary 
award, I agree and will support and put through your de- 
cision. 93 It should not be made public. 

Lenin 



Written on August 19, 1918 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



136 



V. I. LENIN 



160 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

19. VIII. 1918 

Comrade Chicherin, 

The bearer, Comrade Latukka, is a Finnish Social- 
Democrat, who was a great help to us when we were in hiding 
in Finland. 94 He should now be given every possible assist- 
ance. He would like to go to Switzerland. 

Please have a talk with him and help him in realising 
his wish and find a place for him at the Embassy. He is a 
journalist. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



161 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

19. VIII. 1918 

Comrade Chicherin, 

The bearer is la camarade Jeanne Labourbe of whom I 
spoke with you. 
Please receive her and have a detailed talk with her. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



162 

TO N. P. GORBUNOV 

Gorbunov 

It is superfluous and silly of you, after going through 
the papers, to write "for attention of V. I." (!??) ((that 
is obvious anyway)) or "I would propose such and such". 



TELEGRAM TO V. N. KHARLOV. AUGUST 21, 1918 



137 



You should give the gist of the matter in three lines. 
Otherwise there is no sense in your going through them. 

Written in 1918, 
prior to August 20 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



163 

TELEGRAM TO THE TAMBOV GUBERNIA 
FOOD COMMITTEE 

20. VIII. 1918 

Gubernia Food Committee 
Tambov 

In Usman Uyezd, landowners' grain has been harvested 
from 7,000 dessiatines of sown area in Safonovo, Baryatino 
and Novo-Nikolskoye volosts, and has been delivered to 
the elevator. Telegraph immediately how many poods of 
grain there are in this elevator, whether the guard is re- 
liable, why you are slow in dispatching grain to Moscow, 
who is to blame for the scandalous delay, whether there are 
Poor Peasants' Committees 95 in Usman Uyezd and are they 
reliable. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



164 

TELEGRAM TO V. N. KHARLOV 

21. VIII. 1918 

People's Commissar Comrade Kharlov 
Saratov 

The amount of surpluses mentioned by you is clearly 
underestimated. Collect more accurate information. Exem- 
plary villages and volosts, i.e., those with the best organisa- 



138 



V. I. LENIN 



tion of the poor, should be singled out in order, first, to 
determine without concealment the amount of grain sur- 
pluses and, second, to award a big bonus to the volosts 
which have cleaned out and delivered all grain surpluses 
without exception. Pass this on to all food officials and 
telegraph reply. Push on grain shipments. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



165 

TO MEDVEDEV, 
POLITICAL COMMISSAR OF THE 1st ARMY* 

21. VIII. 1918 

Comrade Medvedev, 

Comrade Bosh told me about your meeting at the front, 
about the state of affairs at the front and about your 
doubts. She said that you were sure Syzran could and should 
be captured, but did not want to write here about it. 

If this is so, you are in the wrong. That's what a com- 
missar is for — to complain. Be sure to write (and telegraph) 
to me about everything and more frequently. 

There has not once been a line from you. 

That's too bad. It is not Party behaviour and is a failure 
to fulfil your duty to the state! It's too bad, really. 

Regards, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* On the envelope of the letter Lenin wrote: "To Comrade Medve- 
dev (Political Commissar) (From Lenin)." — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO A. K. PAIKES. AUGUST 22, 1918 



139 



166 

TO THE SUPREME MILITARY COUNCIL 

21. VIII. 1918 

The bearers are representatives of the Turkestan Central 
Executive Committee. They are asking for a detachment of 
100-200 men to be sent against Krasnovodsk (from Astra- 
khan). Please discuss their request and help them in every 
way, and telephone me the decision of the Supreme Military 
Council. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in part in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

167 

TELEGRAMS TO A. K. PAIKES* 
1 

Paikes 
Saratov 

I shall speak right away by telephone with the military 
about all your requests. 96 For the time being I advise ap- 
pointing your own chiefs and shooting conspirators and 
waverers without asking anybody and without allowing 
any idiotic red tape. As regards receiving a reply from me, 
either wait at the telegraph office, or have people take 
their turn of duty, or appoint a time in an hour or two. 
Reply. 

Lenin 

2 

Paikes 
Saratov 

I have just spoken to Aralov. According to what he 
says, everything is already being done to send you shells. 



Transmitted by direct line. — Ed. 



140 



V. I. LENIN 



Loading begins today, so in two or three days it should be 
finished, Act more vigorously against the kulaks. 

Lenin 

Written on August 22, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

168 

TELEGRAM TO THE PENZA GUBERNIA COMMITTEE 
OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 

22. VIII. 1918 

Turlo 

Gubernia Committee 
Penza 

Copy to Minkin 

I do not understand how Minkin could refuse to carry out 
decisions of the majority of the Gubernia Committee. 97 
I hope this is only a misunderstanding. I insist that at a 
critical time of war all should work together harmoniously 
with the greatest determination, submitting to the majority, 
and that conflicts should be referred to the Central Commit- 
tee without interrupting the work. 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

169 

TELEGRAM TO F. I. KOLESOV 

Kolesov 
Tashkent 

We know little about the Caucasus and Baku. Informa- 
tion is unverified. Soviet power exists in the Northern Cauca- 
sus. Its troops are cut off from Tsaritsyn, which is be- 
sieged from the south by the Cossacks. The British have 
landed in Baku and the situation there is unstable. The 
Germans have agreed to guarantee there will be no offensive 
against Baku if we drive out the British from there. How 



TELEGRAM TO A. G. SCHLICHTER. AUGUST 23, 1918 



141 



matters will turn out there is not known. As regards the 
military aid, we do not know where it is. We think it is held 
up near Tsaritsyn.* 

As regards ambassadors and consuls, we advise a waiting 
attitude, keeping them under threefold surveillance and 
arresting suspicious individuals who are in contact with 
them. 

We are considering and preparing some assistance for 
you, but cannot promise anything for certain, for every- 
thing depends on whether we shall be successful in driving 
the British out of Baku or whether they succeed in capturing 
a part of the Caspian coast. 

Written on August 23, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



170 

TELEGRAM TO A. G. SCHLICHTER 

Schlichter 
Vyatka 

I have spoken on the telephone with the Commissariat 
for Food and they agree with me that it would be extremely 
important now for you to remain in Vyatka: first, for assist- 
ance and control in organising the most energetic defence 
of Kotlas and the preparation of explosives for the complete 
demolition, if need be, of the Kotlas-Vyatka railway. 
Second, and most important of all, for the most energetic 
food operations in connection with the successful progress 
being made in suppressing kulak revolts south of Vyatka, 
with a view to ruthless elimination of the kulaks, confisca- 
tion of all their grain and its transportation via Vologda 
and Nizhni-Novgorod, as well as for consolidating the or- 
ganisation of the poor peasants. 

Lenin 

Written on August 23, 1918 

First published on January 22, Printed from the original 

1930, in the newspaper 
Krasnaya Zvezda No. 19 



See this volume, Document 131. — Ed. 



142 



V. I. LENIN 



171 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA 

Sereda, People's Commissar for Agriculture 
Yelets 

Take fullest advantage of the fine weather. Demand a 
food or harvesting detachment for each volost. Do not 
forget we need grain quickly and all grain surpluses should 
be swept up from at least one exemplary volost. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on August 26, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



172 

TELEGRAM TO A. P. SMIRNOV 

26. VIII. 1918 
Smirnov, People's Commissar for Internal Affairs 
Saratov 

(if he is away, forward to Urbach) 

I insist that you definitely come to an agreement with 
Paikes, who is working splendidly and is rightly demand- 
ing independence for the two uyezds. I very much fear 
that you in Saratov are playing at collegiate methods at 
a time when the work demands energy and prompt action 
by responsible executives on the spot in the countryside 
and not in the towns. 

Telegraph me after your talk with Paikes. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1931 
in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO PENZA GUBERNIA E.C. AUGUST 28, 1918 143 



173 

TELEGRAM TO S. P. SEREDA 

27. VIII. 1918 

Sereda, People's Commissar for Agriculture 
Yelets 

If threshing on a mass scale is being held up, as you tel- 
egraph, by the sowing and harvesting of oats, then it 
should help matters to send out a large number of thresh- 
ing detachments. It would be extremely important to speed 
up the business of supply by enlisting Moscow workers, 
Organise this immediately without fail. We must show the 
workers of Moscow clearly from their own mass experience 
that only their participation makes for rapid progress 
in food supply. Do this at once. 

Lenin 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



174 

TELEGRAM TO THE PENZA GUBERNIA 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

28. VIII. 1918 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Penza 

Copy to the Gubernia Communist Organisation 

Internal conflicts among Communists are extremely de- 
plorable. It will be a disgrace if they are not done away 
with. Elect a commission at once to settle the matter in 
two days, for example, by dividing the uyezds among the 
most prominent functionaries so as to separate those who 
are quarrelling. Telegraph the decision of the commission. 

Lenin 



First published in 1931 
in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



Printed from the original 



144 



V. I. LENIN 



175 

TO V. M. ALTFATER 

1 

Comrade Altfater 

How do matters stand as regards sending submarines to 
the Volga and the Caspian Sea? 

Is it true that we can send only old submarines? 
How many of them are there? 

When was the order given for them to be sent? What 
in general has been done? 

Lenin 

Written on August 28, 1918 



2 

Comrade Altfater 

You cannot confine yourself to such vagueness — "we are 
searching" (for your own property? ? The names of the 
"searchers", the date they started searching, etc., should 
be given to me by tomorrow). 

"Clearing up whether dispatch is possible" — this too is 
vague in the extreme. 

Who gave the "clear up" orders, and when? Please let 
me know this tomorrow (30/8) precisely, officially. 

The business of sending submarines brooks not a min- 
ute's delay. 

Lenin 



Written on August 29, 1918 
First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA. AUGUST 29, 1918 



145 



176 

TELEGRAM TO V. N. KHARLOV 

29. VIII. 1918 
Kharlov, People's Commissar for Agriculture 
Petrovsk, Saratov Gubernia 

If all forces in your uyezd have been mobilised, then ob- 
viously you must ask for threshing detachments of workers 
from here, for the harvesting of grain must be speeded up 
many times over. Telegraph daily how many waggons are 
being sent off, under what markings and where from. An- 
nounce a big bonus for the volost that is the first to sweep 
up all grain surpluses. Draw up lists by volosts of the 
richest peasants, who are answerable with their lives for the 
proper progress of the work to supply grain to the starving 
capital cities. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



111 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 98 

Tsyurupa 

I do not advise putting it that way just now (it's some- 
thing in between an ultimatum — resignation of all — and 
vacillation of all in the face of the resoluteness of one). 
Better concentrate all efforts on Yelets + Petrovsk+the best 
of the other uyezds. 

Send out some two thousand workers as threshers, say. 

And a few days later, after receiving at least news that 
so many hundred trucks are en route, raise the question 
more firmly. 

Written on August 29, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



146 



V. I. LENIN 



178 

TO S. P. SEREDA 

Comrade Sereda, 

I'm very sorry you did not drop in. You should not 
have listened to the "overzealous" doctors." 

Why aren't things working out in Yelets Uyezd? This 
worries me very much, and still more your "side-stepping" 
on this question. Clearly, things do not work out. From 19 
volosts with Poor Peasants' Committees, not one clear, pre- 
cise report! 

Not one 2,* how many trucks, in what period of time?!! 

In not one single volost (though there should be in 19) 
have 3-5 intelligent workers from Petrograd (with 15-50 
assistants from Moscow) been brought in. Nowhere are 
there any indications that work is proceeding apacel 

What is wrong? Please do reply. Appoint correspondents 
for me in each volost, give them this letter of mine, and 
let them all reply to me. 

Regards, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written on September 6, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 

179 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Secret 

Ciphered 
(Original to be returned to me) 
(A copy of the cipher to 
be sent to me) 

Trotsky 
Sviyazhsk 

I am surprised and worried at the slowing down of oper- 
ations against Kazan, especially if it is true, as I have 



Total.— Ed. 



TO GRIGORY NAUMOVICH. SEPTEMBER 16, 1918 



147 



been informed, that you have every opportunity of de- 
stroying the enemy by artillery. In my opinion, one must 
not spare the city and put things off any longer, for ruth- 
less annihilation is essential once Kazan is said to be in 
an iron ring. 100 

Lenin 

Written on September 10, 1918 

First published (in facsimile) Printed from the original 

in 1930 in 
Grazhdanskaya voina. 1918- 1921 , 
Vol. Ill 



180 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 



Top secret 

Trotsky 

Kazan or Sviyazhsk 

Congratulations on the capture of Simbirsk. 101 I think 
the maximum effort must be made to clear Siberia as quick- 
ly as possible. Do not grudge money for bonuses. Tele- 
graph whether Kazan's valuable objects have been saved 
and how many of them. Tomorrow I shall be back at work 
again. 

Lenin 



Written on September 12, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, of the telegraph form 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



181 

TO GRIGORY NAUMOVICH, FOR THE GROUP 
OF STUDENTS INTERESTED IN COMMUNISM 



16. IX. 1918 

Dear Comrades, 

I was very glad to receive your letter. From my heart 
I wish you the most speedy success in your study of com- 



148 



V. I. LENIN 



munism, mastery of it, and commencement of practical 
work in the ranks of the Russian Communist Party. 

With communist greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published on April 21, Printed from 

1962, in Izvestia No. 96 the typewritten copy 



182 

TELEGRAM TO THE POOR PEASANTS' COMMITTEES 
OF YELETS UYEZD 

17. IX. 1918 

To all volost Poor Peasants' Committees of Yelets Uyezd 
Yelets 

By circular 
Your telegrams received. 102 

It is impossible to confine oneself to general and vague 
expressions, which too often conceal the complete failure 
of the work. Accurate weekly figures are essential: first, 
exactly what part of the grain surpluses has been collect- 
ed and delivered by which volosts; second, exactly how 
many poods of grain have been delivered, and to which 
elevators and granaries. 

Without such data, all the rest is mere verbosity. Reply 
more exactly. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in part 
on January 21, 1927, in 
Krasnaya Zvezda No. 17 

Published in full in 1931 
in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



Printed from the original 



TO L. B. KAMENEV. SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1918 



149 



183 

TO THE EDITORS OF PR A VDA 

18. IX. 1918 

The bearer, Comrade Mikhail Nikolayevich Sanayev * 
Chairman of the Sergach Uyezd Party Committee (and mem- 
ber of the E.C.), has very interesting things to tell about 
the class struggle in the countryside and the Poor Peasants' 
Committees. 

It is extremely important that such factual material 
from the local areas should appear in the newspaper (there 
is far too much of "generalities"). Will you please take 
down what the comrade says and publish it. 

With comradely greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



184 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 

Kamenev 
Dear L. B., 

Get well quickly. 

About "the fine theory of manoeuvring". 
All theories are good if they correspond to objective re- 
ality. 

But our reality has changed, for if Germany is defeated, 
it becomes impossible to manoeuvre, for there are no long- 
er the two belligerents, between whom we were manoeu- 
vringW 

Attention.** Britain would gobble us up, were it not for 
... the Red Army. 



* Evidently a slip of the pen: the person concerned was Mikhail 
Ivanovich Sanayev. — Ed. 

** This word is in English in the original. — Ed. 



150 



V. I. LENIN 



I don't think we should start talks about revision of 
Brest, as that now would be running ahead.... We must 
wait and see. 

Get well! 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 



Written between the end of 
September and October 1918 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



Printed from the original 



185 

TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 103 

1/X. 1918 

Dear Vladimir Dmitrievich, 

Only this morning I heard the awful news. I cannot trav- 
el to Moscow, but I should like, if only in a letter, to grip 
your hand hard, very hard, to express my love and the 
love of all of us for Vera Mikhailovna, and to give you at 
least a little support, insofar as anyone can do so, in your 
terrible grief. Take good care of your daughter's health. 
Once more, a strong, firm handshake. 

Yours, 

V. Lenin 

First published in 1958 Printed from the original 

in the book: 
Slavniye Bolshevichki 
(Outstanding Bolshevik Women) 
Moscow 



185 

TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE 

Comrade Joffe 
Berlin 

We do not agree to sign the Turkish protocol until the 
hand-over of Baku to our authorities is accepted, for with- 



NOTE TO G. V. CHICHERIN OR L. M. KARAKHAN. OCTOBER 10, 1918 151 



out this clause there is every ground for suspecting secret 
agreements with the Entente for handing Baku over to 
them. We shall publish just that. 104 

Sverdlov, Lenin 

Written on October 7, 1918 

First published in 1957 in Printed from the text 

Dokumenty vneshnei politiki of the telegraph tape 

SSSR, Vol. I 



187 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA AND L. B. KRASIN 

Lyd. Al. (and Krasin) 

I am signing the telegram about oil, ships, etc., with 
pleasure. 

But I don't agree to sign that about Mukhin. 105 

(1) Krasin writes that Mukhin concealed money from Sta- 
lin. This he had no right to do, even if "on the instruc- 
tions of his (!!??) chiefs", for Stalin too is a chief, and a 
higher one, too, though not "his". 

(2) It is wrong formally and impermissible generally to 
decide this without asking Stalin (and Stalin is in 
Moscow!!). 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Written on October 9, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



188 

NOTE TO G. V. CHICHERIN OR L. M. KARAKHAN 
AND A LETTER TO A. A. JOFFE, J. A. BERZIN 
AND V. V. VOROVSKY 

Comrades Chicherin or Karakhan 

Will you please send to Berlin tomorrow, Friday, 12 
copies of my article against Kautsky from Pravda we for 



152 



V. I. LENIN 



Joffe, Berzin and Vorovsky, and the following brief letter 
from me to them: 

Dear Comrades, 

I am very well aware of the shortcomings of my too 
brief article against Kautsky. Nevertheless, it is necessary 
for us, as quickly as possible, to take a stand, to express 
our opinion. Will you please have it translated and published 
as a leaflet. 

Lenin 

10/X. 1918 

First published in 1957 Printed from the original 

in the journal 
Novaya i Noveishaya Istoria 
No. 4 



189 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN AND L. M. KARAKHAN 

Comrades Chicherin and Karakhan 

Regarding the Note to Wilson, I think it should be sent. 

Write it in detail, politely, but caustically, saying: 
in any case we consider it our duty to propose peace — even 
to governments of capitalists and multimillionaires — in or- 
der to try to stop the bloodshed and to open the eyes of the 
peoples. 

The fall of Kazan, Simbirsk, Syzran and Samara has 
obviously exploded such-and-such rumours.... 

Do the capitalists want some of the forests in the north, 
part of Siberia, interest on 17 thousand millions? 107 If so, 
then surely they won't make a secret of it. We propose 
to you: state outright, how much*? Regarding the Brest 
peace — Germany will agree to withdraw her troops. What's 
the matter then? Do you want to replace the German troops 
with your own troops? 

And so on. 

I suggest that you immediately draft such a Note, and 
we shall discuss it together. 108 



The words "how much" are in English in the original. — Ed. 



TO J. A. BERZIN. OCTOBER 15, 1918 



153 



Pravda wanted to publish my article against Kautsky 
Fri day morning. Did you receive from Sverdlov my note 

asking for 12 copies to be sent to Joffe for Berzin and Vorov- ' N.B. 
sky, for them to publish as a leaflet? and to have these dis- 



patched Friday evening? 



What news is there from Litvinov? 109 

What has been done about publishing Japanese leaflets? 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

P.S. We can talk things over on the telephone. 

Written on October 10, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



190 

TO J. A. BERZIN 

15/X. 1918 

Comrade Berzin 

Dear Comrade, 

I have received from you odd copies, as always, of for- 
eign newspapers (can't you have someone make cuttings of 
(a) everything about Russia; (b) everything about the social- 
ist parties of all countries). 

I see from them, incidentally, that Graber and Grimm 
have stupidly and basely attacked Guilbeaux. How could 
you see something had in his taking the money? I don't 
understand. 

You can't censure a valuable comrade without formally 
going into the matter!? Who of the Party members (appoint- 
ed by you) went into it? No one! Yet from Guilbeaux's 
information and from the decision of the Geneva Commis- 
sion it is as clear as clear can be that the case is in favour 
of Guilbeaux. 



154 



V. I. LENIN 



N.B. Send me: Longuet, La politique internationale 
du marxisme. Karl Mart et la France. Vandervelde, 
VEtat et le socialisme* and all similar pamphlets in 
French, German, English and Italian, all, all, all! 
Also: La Russie socialiste (socialistes-revolutionnaires de 
gauche), see La Feuille (Geneve), 110 3. X. 1918.** Pierre 
Loti, Quelques aspects du vertige mondial, Paris (Flam- 
marion). Leon-Frapie, Les contes de la guerre (ibid.). 

I have just received from Sverdlov a set of your publica- 
tions (it would do no harm if you sent this set to me as 
well). 

Too little! Too little!! Too little!!! 

Engage a group of translators and publish 10 times as 
much. Peluso can (and should) write three small pamphlets 
a week (on all subjects, compilations from our newspapers — 
you provide the themes and a list of the articles suitable 
for compilation). His article in Droit du Peuple*** ("Coun- 
ter-Revolutionaries") is good. Pay him well and publish 
10 times as much. (Translators must be engaged, in order 
to publish in 4 languages: French, German, English and 
Italian. You have nothing in the last two. Scandalous! 
Scandalous!!) 

You have plenty of money. (Send without fail an ac- 
count of the sums you have spent.) We shall give more and 
still more, in plenty. Write how much. 

A 100 times more must be published, in 4 languages, 
pamphlets of 4-8-16-32 pages. Engage people for this. 
B. Collect a set of Spartakusbund (I have seen No. 11, IX. 
1918) 112 and republish the entire set in 4 languages. Also 
Junius and Liebknecht. Commission a history of the strug- 
gle against social-chauvinism in Britain, France, Germany, 



* Apparently this refers to E. Vandervelde's pamphlet Le Social- 
isme contre VEtat, Paris, 1918.-— Ed. 

** I think the Left S.R.s have here lied terribly. It is necessary 
at once to commission someone (Leiteisen even) to make a compila- 
tion from Pravda and Izvestia against the lies of the Left S.R.s (and 
also from Znamya Trudovoi Kommuny and from Volya Truda 111 ). 

*** Droit du Peuple— a weekly, organ of the Social-Democratic 
Party of Switzerland, and of the party branches in the canton 
of Vaud and the city of Lausanne.— Ed. 



TO A. A. JOFFE. OCTOBER 18, 1918 



155 



Italy. Form groups for this purpose (Gorter, Balabanova + ? 
+ ??, etc.). 

Yours, 

Lenin 

P.S. What is your optimism about revolutions in the 
countries de l'Entente based on? Facts? Considerations? If 
necessary, send in code, but write more precisely. 

If you are ill, undergo treatment seriously and do not N.B. 
leave the sanatorium. Keep in touch by telephone, and send 
your deputy for visits. 

Sent to Berne 

First published in part Printed from the original 

on January 21, 1925, 
in Pravda No. 17 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



191 

TO A. A. JOFFE 

18. X. 1918 

Comrade Joffe, 

Send me, please, the issue of Sozialistische Auslandspol- 
itik which had Martov's article on dictatorship. 113 

Such things should be sent immediately. 

Ditto — newspaper cuttings (instead of the unreadable 
summaries) — everything relating to the split with the so- 
cial-chauvinists and Kautskyites (with a translation into 
German from the Dutch and Scandinavian languages). 

We ought to act as a bureau for ideological work of an 
international character, but we are doing nothing!! 

A hundred times more must be published. We have the 
money. Engage translators. But we are doing nothing! It 
is scandalous.... 

Please send this letter also to Vorovsky, and forward 
the enclosure, please, to the proper quarter. 114 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



156 



V. I. LENIN 



192 

TO A. A. JOFFE 

18/X. 1918 

Dear Comrade Joffe, 

I received your letter of 13. X after sending off a let- 
ter to you. 

I am not against continuing the "diplomatising". But 
its importance has diminished. The whole point is wheth- 
er the Entente manages to land in force in the Black Sea. 
I have long been talking to everyone everywhere about this 
danger, and have said it clearly in the letter to the Central 
Executive Committee. 115 The radical difference from II. 
1918 is that at that time we had a chance to win time by 
giving away territory. Now there is no such chance. 

Mit besten Griissen, 

Ihr Lenin 

Sent to Berlin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



193 

TO N. P. GORBUNOV 

21. X. 1918 

Comrade Gorbunov, 

I earnestly request you to speed up as much as possible 
the Science and Technology Department's findings in re- 
gard to the Radio Laboratory. It is extremely urgent. Drop 
me a line when its findings are ready. 116 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



TELEGRAM TO P. P. SYTIN. OCTOBER 24, 1918 



157 



194 

APPLICATION TO THE COMMITTEE OF THE SOVIET 
JOURNALISTS' TRADE UNION 

Please enrol me as a member of the Soviet Journalists' 
Trade Union. 

VI. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

Written in October, not later 
than 22, 1918 

Published on October 24, 1918, Printed from 

in Pravda No. 230 the newspaper text 



195 

TELEGRAM TO P. P. SYTIN 



3 addresses: Sytin, Kozlov 

Trotsky, Tsaritsyn 
Voroshilov, Tsaritsyn 

We are receiving desperate telegrams from Voroshilov 
about non-receipt of shells and cartridges despite his re- 
peated demands and insistence. 

Have this checked immediately, take the most urgent 
measures to meet his demands and notify us what has been 
done. Give names of persons responsible for fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars* 

Written on October 24, 1918, 

First published in 1936 Printed from the original 

in the journal Partrabotnik 
(Stalingrad) No. 16-17 



* The document is signed also by Y. M. Sverdlov, Chairman of 
the All-Russia Central Executive Committee. He wrote the sentence 
"Give names of persons responsible for fulfilment". — Ed. 



158 



V. I. LENIN 



196 

TO J. A. BERZIN 

25. X. 1918 

Comrade Berzin 

Dear Comrade B., 

What's this story about Herzog's expulsion?* 
I think we should speak in his favour. Don't forget, the 
people who have expelled him are scoundrels, opportunists. 
Write about this. 

I hope you have wound up the Guilbeaux "affair" in the 
sense of having fully recognised him as rehabilitated. 
Give him my regards. Where is he? 

When will the French edition of The State and Revolu- 
tion appear? 117 Have I time to write a preface against Van- 
dervelde? 

Send me: Vandervelde, Le Socialisme contre VEtat; La 
Belgique envahie et le Socialisme international; Trois as- 
pects de la revolution russe. All three are published by 
Berger-Levrault, Paris, 5-7, rue des Beaux-Arts. 

Please collect all pamphlets of this kind (English, French, 
Italian, German). 

Send information about France more often. What goes 
on there? How are things there? 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to Berne 

First published on January 21, Printed from the original 

1925, in Pravda No. 17 



* The expulsion of Jakob Herzog from the Social-Democratic 
Party of Switzerland. — Ed. 



TO THE BOARD OF PROPERTIES. NOVEMBER 1, 1918 



159 



197 

TELEGRAM TO THE URALS ECONOMIC COUNCIL 

Urals Economic Council, Perm 

Copies to Executive Committee, Usolye 

Berezniki Works Management, Usolye 

I direct the Berezniki works to immediately start organ- 
ising a radium factory in accordance with the decision 
of the Supreme Economic Council. 118 The necessary funds 
have been allocated by the Council of People's Commissars. 
The work should be carried out under the direction and 
on the responsibility of chemical engineer Bogoyavlensky, 
who is to be given the fullest assistance by you. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars* 

Written on October 28, 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 



198 

TO THE BOARD OF PROPERTIES 
OF MOSCOW'S PEOPLE'S PALACES 119 

I earnestly request the Board of Properties of Moscow's 
People's Palaces to gratify the request of the Children's 
Homes Department of the People's Commissariat for Social 
Security. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

1/XI. 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



* The telegram was signed also by L. Y. Karpov, head of the 
Chemical Department of the Supreme Economic Council, and N. P. 
Gorbunov, head of the Science and Technology Department of the Su- 
preme Economic Council. — Ed. 



160 



V. I. LENIN 



199 

TO J. A. BERZIN 

1/XI. 

Dear Berzin, 

I have received a lot of books from you. Many thanks. 

I hear that all are at loggerheads over there. We shall 
take Shklovsky and Zalkind. 

In case of anything, write; I shall sign your orders (to 
your subordinates), so that they will not dare quarrel and 
will strictly carry out your orders. 

Stay in bed and follow the treatment strictly; you ought 
to be living not in Berne, but in the mountains in the sun- 
shine, in some place where there is a telephone and a rail- 
way, and you should send a secretary to Berne and people 
should travel to you. 

In the German translation of The State and Revolution 
an unfortunate error has crept in: the postscript is not 
dated. Yet the whole point is to show that the postscript 
was written after the October Revolution. Namely: 30. 
XI. 1917. Could not a correction slip be pasted in? 



Some capable comrades are on their way to you. Do not 
grudge money, particularly through them, for propaganda 
in France. 

All the very best, 

Yours, 

Lenin 



N.B. Prepare everything for the eventuality that the Entente 
will force Switzerland to deport you. Bereit sein!! 120 

P.S. If the French translation of The State and Revolu- 
tion is ready, put it out at once, but in the publisher's pre- 
face criticise both Kautsky and Vandervelde (Le Sociali- 
sme contre VEtat), because Vandervelde slurred over, con- 
cealed, distorted everything of importance about the state. 

I am sending about half a pamphlet against Kautsky. 
Will you please have it translated as quickly as possible 
and let me know by telegram: Antikautsky is being trans- 



TO R. I. BERZIN. NOVEMBER 1918 



161 



lated into German, French or 
it done here. 

I hope you sent Staat und 
more the better! 

Written on November 1, 1918 
Sent to Berne 

First published in part on 
January 21, 1925, in Pravda 
No. 17 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



Italian. Otherwise I'll have 
Revolution to Berlin? The 

Printed from the original 



200 

TELEGRAM TO THE COMMANDER 
OF THE 2nd ARMY 

I greet the valiant Red Army troops who captured Izhevsk. 
Congratulations on the anniversary of the revolution. Long 
live the socialist Red Army! 121 

Lenin 

Written on November 7, 1918 
Sent to Vyatskiye Polyany 

First published in 1928 in Printed from the text 

Grazhdanskaya voina. 1918- 1921 , of the telegraph form 

Vol. I 



201 

TO R. I. BERZIN 

Comrade Berzin 

I take this opportunity to send greetings through you 
to the troops of the 3rd Army and wishes for every success. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written in November 
between 9 and 23, 1918 

Published on November 23, 1918, Printed from 

in the newspaper Krasny Nabat the newspaper text 

(Perm) No. 60 



162 



V. I. LENIN 



202 

TO B. S. WEISSBROT 

Comrade Weissbrot, 

You happen to be in Vienna * I hope you will do ev- 
erything you can to find the Lefts. Perhaps Strasser (Josef 
Strasser) will help find them, although he himself, proba- 
bly, is not ...* to help them. 

Write more often, with every courier. 

If possible (if you have good connections, etc.) try to 
rescue my library from Poronin (Galizien)**: I left it there 
at the dacha with my things in 1914, I had to pay a bal- 
ance of 50 kronen; now I would give 100,000,000 to have 
the library rescued. But that ...* is a personal matter. 122 

The important thing is to find the Lefts in Vienna and 
to help them in every way. I'm afraid you won't succeed 
in this owing to the lack of connections, but try to do 
everything possible. 

Write. 



11/XI. 1918 

Sent to Vienna 

First published in part 
in 1940 in 
Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 4 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

203 

TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV 

13/XI— 18 

Comrade Bryukhanov, 

Will you please assist the bearers, Comrades Sadkov and 
Renqvist, representatives of the Finnish Communist Club 

* The manuscript is partly damaged. — Ed. 
** Lenin made an insertion here in the manuscript, the legible 

part of which reads: "...I lived in Poronin under my own name " 

— Ed. 



Regards, 

Yours, 

Lenin 



Printed from the original 



TO THE MANAGER OF THE PEOPLE'S BANK. NOVEMBER 19, 1918 163 



and the Finnish railwaymen. Cannot they be given the 9,000 
poods they need from the Moscow warehouses or, if that is 
absolutely impossible, from the Tambov grain collection 
depots? It is essential to help them. 123 

Regards, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

204 

TELEGRAM TO I. I. VATSETIS 

Urgent 
Top priority 
15. XI. 1918 

Commander-in-Chief Vatsetis 

Serpukhov 

Copy to Trotsky 

I request you to decide in favour of the plan of the Cen- 
tral Bureau of the occupied countries* for forming Polish 
and Lithuanian shock battalions, in particular a Western 
brigade on the Southern Front. I am reminding Trotsky 
of our decision. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

205 

TO THE MANAGER OF THE PEOPLE'S BANK 124 

I think there has been enough celebrating. It is ludic- 
rous! 



* This refers to the Central Bureau of Communist Organisations 
in the occupied regions. — Ed. 



164 



V. I. LENIN 



We shall "celebrate" 14. XII by a nice, correct, skil- 
ful, rapid merger of the Co-operative Bank with the State 
Bank. 

Lenin 

19. XI. 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

206 

TELEGRAM TO THE TECHNICAL COMMITTEE 
OF THE ECONOMIC COUNCIL OF THE NORTHERN AREA 

21. XI. 1918 

Technical Committee 
Northern Economic Council 
Petrograd 

I severely reprimand you for procrastination and non- 
fulfilment of the directive of the Science and Technology 
Department of the Supreme Economic Council for the deliv- 
ery of materials to the Central Science and Technology 
Laboratory of the Military Department. I demand that the 
materials be issued immediately and that every assistance 
be given in accelerating the experiments. Report fulfil- 
ment. 125 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 

207 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

21. XI. 1918 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Today I severely reprimanded the Technical Committee 
of the Northern Economic Council for procrastination. Ex- 
plain to the Economic Council of the Northern Area that 



TO G. V. CHICHERIN. NOVEMBER 23, 1918 



165 



its duty is to expedite experiments and ensure speedy 
fulfilment of the assignments of the Science and Technology 
Department of the Supreme Economic Council. If the 
document from the Technical Committee dated November 
13, No. 646, is not merely a case of procrastination and 
stupidity, but malicious sabotage, then I demand an inves- 
tigation and the arrest of those guilty. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



208 

TELEGRAM TO V. M. GITTIS 

23. XI. 1918 

Army Commander Gittis 
Vologda 

I am entirely in sympathy with your plan to release pris- 
oners of war, but only a few at a time and exclusively those 
who have really been won over by our propaganda. Telegraph 
me at once, if necessary in code, how many prisoners you 
have, of what nationality, and how many of them have been 
propagandised. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



209 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 126 

A very detailed and caustic reply must be drawn up. 
Do we recognise the German Government? Is it recognised 
by all the Councils of Deputies in Germany? If it is, then 
we, too, recognise it. 

"Not to influence"? By word of mouth, by the press? 



166 



V. I. LENIN 



From the viewpoint of democracy or dictatorship? Please 
clarify, but we declare that if they demand in the form 
of an ultimatum that we do not carry on agitation, we shall 
not break with them on that account. 

Written on November 23, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



210 

TO THE BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE C.P.C. 

I am for using this palace as a museum. Get Sverdlov's 
written consent. 127 

Lenin 

26/XI. 

Written on November 26, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



211 

CONVERSATION BY DIRECT LINE WITH B. M. VOLIN 
NOVEMBER 29, 1918 

Comrade Volin, Chairman of the Orel Gubernia Executive Commit- 
tee and Gubernia Party Committee, on the line: 

I have just received a telegram from Surazh as follows: "On No- 
vember 29, a congress of German Councils in the Ukraine is taking 
place at Gomel. It is essential to send representatives. We have sent the 
head of the Information Department, and others. We are conducting 
talks with a big German Council in the Ukraine and are enlisting in 
the Red Army volunteers from the German army. Send directives 
for talks to our representatives in the Ukraine. Our representatives 
have been guaranteed safety, they are under German protection. The 
temper of the German army is thoroughly Bolshevik." I decided today 
to send to Gomel a Communist, Chairman of the Soviet, and a Ger- 
man, the Communist Meyer, from the International Detachment. 
Should the Chairman of the Orel Soviet only make a speech of greet- 
ings or can he take upon himself a political mission? I am asking you 
for a directive. If you know of this congress and have sent your repre- 
sentatives, then perhaps our delegation is not necessary. 



TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. NOVEMBER 30, 1918 



167 



Lenin: I know nothing about this congress. I advise you 
to get in touch immediately with the Ukrainian Communists 
and with their Central Committee via Kursk. The reports 
about the majority of the German Councils being on the 
side of the Bolsheviks must be carefully verified. If this is 
not the case, then it is necessary at the congress to deliver 
a detailed, well-substantiated, principled speech about Bol- 
shevism and its tasks. If, however, the German soldiers 
are already Bolsheviks or Spartacists, then we must propose 
to them an immediate alliance with us for the speediest 
restoration of Soviet power in the Ukraine and for the ar- 
rest not only of whiteguards, but also of the supporters of 
the Rada. In any case people must be sent to the congress 
who are capable of accurately reporting back all the discus- 
sions and resolutions. 

If it is already too late to send new representatives to 
the congress, then try to wire my note through to the 
people you have already sent. I await a reply. 

Volin: Vladimir Ilyich, I informed you that I decided to send 
the Chairman of the Soviet to Gomel. He is leaving tonight. That 
was why I asked for your directive. Simultaneously with this I shall 
try to get in touch with Kursk. 

Lenin: I am very glad that you are sending the chairman 
to the congress. I hope you are satisfied with my sugges- 
tions. Arrange for me to get information about each day 
of the congress. 128 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten copy 

212 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

30. XI. 1918 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Copy to Strievsky 

Volkov, representative of Petrosoyuz,* and Misyursky, 
a delegate from the conference of workers' co-operatives of 



Petrograd Co-operative Union. — Ed. 



168 



V. I. LENIN 



the Northern Region, declare that there was not and could 
not be any shadow of assistance to counter-revolutionaries 
in paying salaries and wages to office staff and workers 
one month in advance. They promise to dispel the misun- 
derstanding that has arisen, and express a desire to work 
with complete loyalty on the basis of the new decree. 129 
Khinchuk confirms their assurances. 

Please go into the matter closely and give the co-opera- 
tors an opportunity to work. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



213 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

3. XII. 1918 

Copy to the Chairman 

of the Petrograd Section of the Vecheka* 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

Comrade Karl Moor, a Swiss, has sent me a long letter 
asking for Palchinsky to be set free on the grounds that he 
is a prominent technician and organiser, author of Many 
books, etc. I have heard and read about Palchinsky as 
having been a speculator, etc., during Kerensky's time. 

But I do not know whether there is now any evidence 
against Palchinsky? Of what kind? Is it serious? Why 
has the amnesty law not been applied to him? 130 

If he is a scientist, a writer, could he not — if there are 
serious charges against him — be given special treatment 
(for example, house arrest, a laboratory, etc.). 

Please reply to me immediately in writing. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

Sent to Petrograd 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



All-Russia Extraordinary Commission. — Ed. 



TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. DECEMBER 11, 1918 169 



214 

TELEGRAM TO THE TAMBOV GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEE 

7. XII. 1918 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Tambov 

Copy to Uyezd Executive Committee 
Borisoglebsk 

Received a complaint from Ivan Bogdanov about the 
arrest for sabotage of his 17-year-old son, Vladimir, who 
is suffering from bronchitis. Re-examine the case, check 
as to the illness, inexperience, youth of the arrested per- 
son, and particularly investigate whether the real saboteurs 
were not the 30 officials of the Commissariat for Agricul- 
ture who had refused to do the work and shifted it on to 
Bogdanov. Telegraph the result of the check. 131 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



215 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 132 

If you go deeper into the matter you will see that this 
manoeuvring is precisely a concession to an alien element, 

namely, the "free trader". 

Written on December 10, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



216 

TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 

11. XII. 1918 

Dear V. D., 

I am sending you a pamphlet on the implementation of 
laws Think of a title that would be most clear, striking 
and resounding. 



170 



V. I. LENIN 



And publish it as quickly as possible. 133 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



217 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

12. XII. 1918 

Trotsky 
Voronezh 

or present whereabouts 

Astrakhan wires re necessity of stepping up work by the 
flotilla* in view of the uprising of the Bolsheviks in Geor- 
gia and the highly dangerous menace of a British advance. 
Would you not find it useful if Raskolnikov, who for 
some reason is hanging around in Moscow, were sent to 
Astrakhan? 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



218 

TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV 

12. XII. 1918 

Dear Comrade Shlyapnikov, 

I am taking this opportunity to send you greetings and 
materials for the investigation. 134 Think it over thoroughly 
in advance and discuss it with 2 or 3 of the most reliable 
members of the Cheka, and catch the scoundrels named 
here without fail. Spare no effort to catch and shoot the 



The Astrakhan-Caspian naval flotilla. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. DECEMBER 12, 1918 171 



Astrakhan profiteers and bribe-takers. This riffraff must be 
dealt with in such a way that everyone will remember 
it for years to come. 

The materials, I have been told, come from an honest 
tradesman who has remained here. 

Regarding your requests and commissions, I have 
phoned, asked and repeated them.* I hope that part — and 
the most substantial part — will be met. The whole, of 
course, is beyond our resources. 

Telegraph what items among those outstanding are most 
urgently required. 

Do your utmost to carry out repairs and increase the 
carrying capacity of the Astrakhan railway line. 

What success has been achieved at sea? With our fleet? 
With the base near Kizlyar? 135 

Write! 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to Astrakhan 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

Published in full in 1956 
in the book: V. I. Lenin, 
Voyennaya perepiska 
(War Correspondence), 
Moscow 



219 

TELEGRAMS TO L. D. TROTSKY 



Trotsky at his present whereabouts 

Perm is in a dangerous plight. 136 I consider it essential 
to send reinforcements. Petrograd can provide regiments 



* This refers to the speeding up of deliveries of arms and muni- 
tions to Astrakhan. — Ed. 



172 



V. I. LENIN 



of Soviet poor peasants, there are two of them there, or 
others, at the direction of the Revolutionary Military 
Council. We propose that you give the appropriate direc- 
tives as quickly as possible. We propose that you point 
out to the Revolutionary Military Council* the tremen- 
dous importance of Kizel District of Perm which supplies 
coal to the factories and the entire railway. The loss of 
Kizel will halt traffic. 

Lenin** 

Written on December 12, 1918 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the text 
of the telegraph tape 



2 

All coded 

13. XII. 191 

Trotsky 
Voronezh 

or present whereabouts 

News from around Perm is extremely alarming. Danger 
threatens it. I am afraid we forgot about the Urals. Bring 
pressure to bear on Vatsetis without fail and check wheth- 
er he is sufficiently energetically providing reinforce- 
ments for Perm and the Urals. Lashevich told Zinoviev 
that only blooded units should be sent. 

Lenin 

First published in part on 
February 23, 1938, in Pravda 
No. 53 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



* The Revolutionary Military Council of the Eastern Front. — 

Ed. 

**The telegram was signed also by Sverdlov. — Ed. 



TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. DECEMBER 12, 1918 



173 



220 

TO G. I. PETROVSKY 137 

Petrovsky 

I demand immediate institution of the strictest investi- 
gation and a report to me on its institution and the re- 
sult. 

Lenin 

16/XII. 

Written on December 16, 1918 

First published in 1931 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



221 

TO Y. M. SVERDLOV 

Sverdlov, 

for your information 

Yesterday, 15/XII, Bukharin told me that, as testified 
by Yem. Yaroslavsky, Spiridonova is conducting party 
propaganda. 138 

Written on December 16, 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



222 

TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY 

21. XII. 1918 

To the Vecheka 
Comrade Dzerzhinsky, 
I enclose a complaint. 

Please find out without fail who is responsible for this 
red tape (no reply from 3. XII to 20. XII!! Yet the decree 
is dated 21. XI!!!) and prosecute. 139 Such a disgraceful thing 



174 



V. I. LENIN 



must not he allowed to go unpunished. Apparently there 
are saboteurs in the office. 

Further, you must appoint a person to take charge of 
the speedy, immediate transfer of the warehouses. 

Report what you have done. 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



223 

TO D. A. BULATOV 

25. XII. 1918 

Bulatov, Chairman of the Gubernia Executive Committee 
Tver 

I authorise you to investigate the enclosed complaint 
and report the result to me as soon as possible. 

Report essentials by telegraph ("re the case of the school- 
teacher Ivanova"). 

Particularly important: check the statement that in the 
Poor Peasants' Committee there are former and present 
elements of the Black Hundreds: Teterin, Skvortsov, Koz- 
lov, Baskakov. 

Start the check discreetly to prevent premature publici- 
ty and be able to catch them red-handed and expose them 
completely. 

Should the accusation prove to be true, these Black 
Hundreders must be kicked out publicly and a leaflet about 
the affair promulgated throughout the volost and uyezd, 
for the population must be taught that well-founded com- 
plaints are of great significance and lead to important re- 
sults. 

Telegraph me: "Letter received, directive will be carried 
out", and then about the progress of the investigation. 

Send the results by letter, the exact findings of the in- 
vestigation and the measures taken. 



TELEGRAM TO RODNIKI E.C. DECEMBER 26, 1918 



175 



I think that as Chairman of the Gubernia Executive 
Committee you need no special mandate from me for such 
a simple case. If need be, I will send it. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

N.B. Enclosed herewith is V. S. Ivanova's complaint. 140 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXI 



224 

TELEGRAM TO S. A. BANK 141 

Bank, Chairman of the Uyezd Economic Council 
Vyshny Volochok 

Army stores are at the disposal of the military authori- 
ties. Hand over army stocks to the military department; 
unseal all stores; distribute property among the depart- 
ments; carry out stocktaking without interrupting current 
work. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

Written on December 25, 1918 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



225 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE RODNIKI EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 142 

Rodniki Executive Committee 
Rodniki, Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia 
Copy to the Cheka 

Immediately unseal the store-room and living-room of 
Pyotr Ilyich Surkov in Kutilovo village. Report the names 



176 



V. I. LENIN 



of those who did the sealing and the explanation of their 
action, why they are requisitioning books. Wire execution. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



226 

TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY 
COUNCIL OF THE REPUBLIC 

27. XII. 1918 

Revolutionary Military Council 
Serpukhov 

I fully agree with Trotsky's telegram on fraternisation. 143 
Please urgently draft an instruction on fraternisation and 
especially encourage it on the Northern Front. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



227 

TELEGRAM TO THE MANAGEMENT 
OF THE YUZHSK FACTORY 

28. XII. 1918 
Management of the Yuzhsk nationalised factory 
Vyazniki 

Two days ago the Food Commissariat issued an urgent 
order for grain to be delivered from Nizhni-Novgorod for 
the Vyazniki distribution centre. I advise going to Nizh- 
ni. I authorise you to make a check and urge speed. Com- 
plain to me if there is any red tape. 144 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1931 
in Lenin Miscellany XVIII 



Printed from the original 



TO THE LIBRARY SECTION. DECEMBER 30, 1918 



177 



228 

TELEGRAM TO THE RODNIKI EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 

28. XII. 1918 

Executive Committee 

Rodniki, Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia 

Mail all your decisions on libraries. Surkov agrees to 
hand over his library to the local workers' reading-room, 
and this seems to me fair. 145 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



229 

TO THE LIBRARY SECTION 
OF THE COMMISSARIAT FOR EDUCATION 146 

30. XII. 1918 

Please receive the bearer, Comrade Prokofiev. His re- 
quest for the requisitioning of Surkov' s library for a district 
of 40,000 people is, in my opinion, correct. Surkov, per- 
haps, should retain certain rights to use it? Please send 
me a copy of your decision on this question, and help the 
Rodniki comrades to expand their library. Can they not be 
sent one of the libraries requisitioned from the landowners? 
Please inform me about this as well. 147 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



178 



V. I. LENIN 



230 

TO S. P. SEREDA 

1) When will the pamphlet Issue VI. Materials on Land 
Reform be published? 

2) The remaining issues should be speeded up. 148 
(This publication is extremely important.) 

3) I think at least half a page should be added clearly 
setting forth the policy of the People's Commissariat for 
Agriculture (otherwise, there is the danger that the pam- 
phlet, "in going among the people", will muddle them up). 

Written at the end of 1918 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



231 

NOTE ON THE PUBLICATION OF LEAFLETS 

I agree. 

More and more such leaflets (with translations into 
French, Italian and Ukrainian) should be sent at once also 
to the south, to the Ukraine, to meet the British. 149 

Lenin 

Written at the end of 1918 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



179 



1919 



232 

TO V. I. NEVSKY 150 

What has been done to speed up train traffic? 

When was the order given for this traffic to be run at 
passenger service speed? Obtain for me information on 
traffic speed. 

Written on January 1, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



233 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

1. I. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I have given orders for trucks to be dispatched to Petro- 
grad from Moscow and from Nizhni-Novgorod by passen- 
ger trains. See to it. If you were caught napping during 
the hold-up a month ago and failed to lodge a com- 
plaint in time, then you can blame yourself also for not 
having taken steps to verify the speed of trucks after our 
telephone conversation on Friday.* 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



♦December 27, 1918.— Ed. 



180 



V. I. LENIN 



234 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE 
TO THE COMMISSARIAT FOR INTERNAL AFFAIRS 



January 1, 1919 

Greetings and New Year salutations to the Communist 
group. With all my heart I wish that in the new year we 
shall all commit fewer stupidities than in the old and that 
the building up of Soviet power, to which the comrades 
of the Commissariat for Internal Affairs in particular are 
devoting their labours, will be carried to a successful con- 
clusion. 



Lenin 



Pravda No. 3, January 4, 1919 Printed from 

the typewritten copy, 
collated 
with the newspaper text 



235 

TO A. N. PROKOFIEV 

3. I. 1919 

Comrade Prokofiev, 

I am sending you Bryusov's letter. 151 Please return it 
to me with information as to how you settled the question 
of Surkov's library. 

I hope, nevertheless, you will do everything possible to 
give Surkov some satisfaction: for example, the right to 
use it, and so forth. 

It appears you should have approached the Library Sec- 
tion of the Extra-Mural Department. I will ask them to 
take care of you. 152 

With communist greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (N. Lenin) 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



Printed from the original 



TO VESYEGONSK UYEZD E.C. AND TVER GUBERNIA E.C. 181 



236 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

To be coded 
3. I. 1919 

Trotsky 
Voronezh 

or present whereabouts 

Am very uneasy about whether you are not giving too 
much attention to the Ukraine to the detriment of the gen- 
eral strategic task, on which Vatsetis insists and which 
consists in a speedy, determined and general offensive 
against Krasnov. I am very much afraid that we are being 
late with this and that the recent successes of the Krasnov- 
ites near Tsaritsyn will again lead to the postponement 
of our offensive and to our missing the right moment. The 
initiative for serious operations is escaping from us, both 
at Astrakhan and on the Caspian Sea, as well as at Tsa- 
ritsyn and in the east. Vatsetis is for a speedy general 
offensive against Krasnov, but Vatsetis, apparently, is not 
able to cope with red tape and the separatism of the Ukrain- 
ians and other regionalists. Should you not concentrate 
wholly on hastening and carrying through a general offen- 
sive against Krasnov? 

Lenin 

First published in part in Printed from the original 

Grazhdanskaya voina. 1918-1921 , 
Vol. Ill 

Published in full in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

237 

TO THE VESYEGONSK UYEZD 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
AND THE TVER GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

3. I. 1919 

Please discuss the question of helping the Vasyutino 
Committee of the R.C.P. with timber, a financial loan and 
a library for the restoration of the People's House de- 



182 



V. I. LENIN 



stroyed by fire. If help is required from the centre, notify 
me simultaneously with applications to the appropriate 
People's Commissariats. 153 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

Izvestia of the Vesyegonsk Soviet Printed from 

of Workers', Peasants' and the newspaper text 

Red Army Deputies No. 2 (30), 
January 18, 1919 



238 

TELEGRAM TO RYABININ 154 

5. I. 1919 

Ryabinin, Chairman, general meeting of workers 
Gorkino, Northern Railway 

The delegates may come whenever they like. I shall try 
to see them personally, but if I cannot, then it will be 
through the secretary. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



239 

TELEGRAM TO THE SIMBIRSK GUBERNIA 
FOOD COMMISSAR 

A committee from 42 organisations of starving Petrograd 
and Moscow workers is complaining about your inefficien- 
cy. I demand the maximum effort on your part, an end to 
a formal attitude to the work and the utmost assistance to 
the starving workers. In the event of failure, I shall be 
compelled to arrest the entire staff of your institutions 
and have them prosecuted. I have given urgent orders to 



TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV. JANUARY 6, 1919 



183 



increase the number of locomotives and trucks. You should 
immediately load the available two trains of 30 trucks each. 
Telegraph fulfilment. 

You are obliged to receive grain from the peasants day 
and night. If it is confirmed that you have not been accept- 
ing grain after 4 p.m. and compelling the peasants to wait 
until the morning, you will be shot. 



TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV 
FOR THE UFA REVOLUTIONARY COMMITTEE 

Gusev 

Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 
Arzamas 

Inform the Revolutionary Committee in Ufa for their 
guidance that negotiations must be begun immediately 
with the Socialist-Revolutionaries who are proposing nego- 
tiations, after taking all precautions against attempts at 
provocations and for safeguarding the front, while at the 
same time guaranteeing absolute personal immunity to the 
envoys from the Socialist-Revolutionaries. At the talks it 
is to be stated clearly straight away that there can be no 
question of any change in the Soviet Constitution, because 
Soviet power, being the power of the exploited classes 
for suppressing the exploiters, has definitely proved its 
necessity for securing victory over the bourgeoisie, and 
the Soviet movement is now spreading to all countries of 
the world. 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on January 6, 1919 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



240 



184 



V. I. LENIN 



Continually report directly to us on the whole course 
of the negotiations, and on the participants of both sides. 155 

Lenin, Sverdlov* 

Written on January 6, 1919 

First published in 1960 Printed from the original 

in the book: 
Y. M. Sverdlov, Izbranniye 
proizvedeniya v trekh tomakh 
(Selected Works in three volumes), 
Vol. 3** 



241 

TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY 

COUNCIL 

OF THE CASPIAN-CAUCASIAN FRONT, 
THE ASTRAKHAN GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
AND GUBERNIA COMMITTEE OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 

Shlyapnikov, Gubernia Executive Committee 
Gubernia Committee of the Party of Communists 
Astrakhan*** 

A conflict with the Party Committee is inadmissible. 
Take all steps to ensure proper teamwork. All Party mem- 
bers, irrespective of the post they occupy, must belong to 
the local organisation. The Party Committee should not in- 
terfere in the work of institutions directly subordinated to 
the centre. It has the right only to put its views before the 
Central Committee. All local work is directed by the Party 
centre. Intervention is possible from within or if there is a 
special instruction of the C.C. on some concrete question. 
Similar relations should be established with the Gubernia 
Executive Committee. Only in the event of non-fulfilment of 
decrees or of work against the decisions of the central au- 
thority is direct intervention possible. Great tact is essential, 
then conflicts will be impossible. General talk about the 
need for a radical purge in military institutions is of no 

* The last sentence of the telegram and the signatures are in 
Sverdlov's handwriting.— Ed. 

**In this publication it is erroneously indicated that the tele- 
gram was written by Sverdlov.— Ed. 

***The word "Astrakhan" is in Lenin's handwriting.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. JANUARY 9, 1919 



185 



value. We shall take note of concrete references to particu- 
lar facts or persons. 

Lenin* 

Written on January 7 or 8, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Sverdlov's handwriting 

and signed by Lenin 



242 

DIRECTIVE TO THE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF 156 

We append three signatures of C.C. members to the de- 
mand of the two C.C. members, and forward this demand, 
as a demand of the Central Committee, to the military au- 
thorities for fulfilment. 

Members of the C.C, R.C.P. 

Moscow, 8. I. 1919 

Lenin** 

First published (in facsimile) Printed from the original 

in 1939 in Voyenno- Istorichesky 
Zhurnal No. 5 



243 

TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

9. I. 1919 

Front Headquarters 
Astrakhan 

for transmission by radio to Orjonikidze 
Vladikavkaz 

Received your first telegram. I thank you and send greet- 
ings. Please report more frequently. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* This is followed by the signature of Sverdlov in Lenin's hand- 
writing. — Ed. 

** There follow the signatures of Sverdlov and Smilga.— Ed. 



186 



V. I. LENIN 



244 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

10. I. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

From my talks with Ravich and Kalinin, and from Sha- 
durskaya's telegram I gather that nine-tenths of the top 
machinery of government in Petrograd are engaged in doing 
nothing. I advise you to think over and urgently carry out 
a reorganisation, by transferring tens, if not hundreds, of 
the best people to actual control of transport, with you your- 
self heading the actual control of the food trains. Otherwise 
there is no salvation. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



245 

TELEGRAM TO THE RYAZAN GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEE 

12. I. 1919 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Ryazan 

What steps have been taken in connection with the 
large-scale profiteering discovered by the State Control in 
public dining-rooms? 157 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



TELEGRAM TO A. P. KUDRYAVTSEV. JANUARY 13, 1919 187 



246 

TELEGRAM TO THE SUZDAL UYEZD EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 158 

12. I. 1919 

Uyezd Executive Committee 

Suzdal, Vladimir Gubernia 

Copy to Gubernia Executive Committee 

Vladimir 

Check very strictly the behaviour of the anti-profiteer 
detachments and the Extraordinary Commission in Gavri- 
lov Posad. Are receipts being issued for the requisitioned 
grain, are accounts properly kept, what is being done with 
the requisitioned grain? Telegraph fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



247 

INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY 159 

The first intelligent report. Find out who Pashkov is, 
write to the People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs 
that I welcome this first intelligent report, I thank Pash- 
kov, and demand the same from others. 

Written on January 13, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



248 

TELEGRAM TO A. P. KUDRYAVTSEV 

Kudryavtsev, Head of Library Section, Commissariat for 

Education 

Petrograd 

Guard Struve's library, deposited at the Polytechnical 
Institute, from being looted. Hand over the most valuable 



188 



V. I. LENIN 



items to the Public Library, the remainder to the Polytech- 
nical Institute. The portrait of Gerd by Yaroshenko should 
be handed to Nina Alexandrovna Struve through the Di- 
rector of the Polytechnical Institute. 
Telegraph fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on January 13, 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

249 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 160 

Tsyurupa: 

In any case we must prepare for, announce and hold 
Starving Children's Week. 

Perhaps it should be combined with grain requisitioning 
and a special mobilisation of the Poor Peasants' Committees. 

Perhaps something more could be done for the children? 

It should be. 

I enclose this about meat: please return it to me as 
quickly as possible with the Food Commissariat's brief 
comment. 161 

Written in January, 
not earlier than 14, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

250 

TO THE BUSINESS MANAGER 
OF THE COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 

18. I. 1919 

I direct you to report to me immediately all complaints 
received by the Managing Department of the Council of 
People's Commissars against all government offices and 
persons; complaints in writing must be reported to me 



TO M. K. VLADIMIROV. JANUARY 22, 1919 



189 



within twenty-four hours, oral ones — within forty-eight 
hours. 

The Managing Department should introduce a special 
registration of these complaints, the person in charge of 
the office of the Managing Department being responsible 
for careful supervision over the fulfilment of my instruc- 
tions written on these complaints. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1945 Printed from the 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV typewritten 

text signed by Lenin 



251 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 162 

Comrade Trotsky, 

Return this to me, please, after writing your opinion. 
I think it is an absolute scandal that Vatsetis assigned 
the three regiments to Narva. Cancel it!! 

Lenin 

21/1. 

Written on January 21, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



252 

TO M. K. VLADIMIROV 

22. I. 1919 

Comrade Vladimirov, 

Your letter received. 163 Many thanks. I shall try 
to have the draft adopted immediately, even before the 
meeting of the Council of Defence — by viva voce. 



190 



V. I. LENIN 



It would be good if you were to give for the press (if only 
occasionally) appeals addressed to the workers. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



253 

TO K. I. LANDER 

23. I. 1919 

Comrade Lander, 

I draw your attention to the decision adopted today in 
the C.P.C.: you are directed to check before Saturday (by 
the Saturday sitting of the C.P.C.) fulfilment by Prodfaz- 
top* for other bodies of the Food Commissariat) of the 
decree of the C.P.C. dated January 18, 1919; 

— to ascertain the reasons for procrastination; 

— to discover the people who are to blame. 164 

Appoint an intelligent Communist inspector, be sure to 
add to him a worker, and make haste, so that they begin 
work Friday morning (if no worker is available, start with- 
out him and let him join in later). 

I consider the matter important; they should supply infor- 
mation the same day. It is necessary to check the business 
correspondence of Prodfaztop, the office routine in regard to 
telegrams (whether they are in order, whether they are easy 
to find, whether the time of reply is checked, and so on). 

Please do this as quickly and as strictly as possible. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



*A department of the People's Commissariat for Food in charge 
of food supplies for workers of factories, mills and fuel organisa- 
tions.— Ed. 



TO SAMARA GUBERNIA E.C. JANUARY 27, 1919 



191 



254 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Secret 

Trotsky, Chairman of the Revolutionary Military Council 
Kozlov, or present whereabouts 

Wilson is proposing a truce and is calling all the govern- 
ments of Russia to a conference. I am afraid he wants to 
secure for himself Siberia and part of the south, having 
no hope otherwise of keeping anything. In the light of the 
capture of Orenburg, Lugansk and Chertkov this circum- 
stance compels us, in my opinion, to exert every effort to 
capture Rostov, Chelyabinsk and Omsk within a month. 
This last is in accordance with our talk. Make a special 
check of Vatsetis's strategy after the capture of Orenburg 
and give your opinion. I think you will have to go to Wil- 
son. 165 

Lenin 

Written on January 24, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten copy 



255 

TELEGRAM TO THE SAMARA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 

COMMITTEE 166 

27. I. 1919 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Samara 

Send immediately to Moscow all the material against 
the Right Socialist-Revolutionary Alexander Mikhailovich 
Smirnov, report the reasons for his arrest, verify his state- 
ment about wishing to work with Soviet power against 
Kolchak, meanwhile give Smirnov most favourable treat- 
ment while under arrest. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



192 



V. I. LENIN 



256 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 



Sklyansky 



From Z. P. Krzhizha- 
novskaya via a woman 
delegate to the Extra- 
Mural Education Con- 



30. I. 1919 



A group of eight airmen in 
the army in the field, Tsaritsyn 
Front, Red Air Fleet (23rd 
Aeronautical Detachment) — head- 
ed by chauffeur Baranov (pre- 
viously of the 8th unit of the 
Special Aeronautical Division) — 
request that inspectors be sent 
there, they report that the air 
detachments exist only on pa- 
per and that the state of affairs 
threatens catastrophe . m 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



257 

TO L. B. KRASIN 

Hand it immediately to Chicherin and see to it (or in- 
struct someone else to see to it) that this policy is vigor- 
ously and incessantly pursued. 168 

Written during 
January-February 1919 

First published in 1960 Printed from the original 

in the journal 
Voprosy Istorii No. 7 



TELEGRAM TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV. FEBRUARY 12, 1919 193 



258 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY AND V. N. PODBELSKY 



1 

Sklyansky: 

Forbid this playing at telegrams. 169 

Written on February 10, 1919 



2 

Sklyansky and Podbelsky: 

Can't you issue a circular putting a stop to these stupid 
telegrams to 100 addresses? 170 

Written on February 11, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



259 

TELEGRAM TO A. G. SHLYAPNIKOV 

12. II. 1919 

Shlyapnikov 
Astrakhan 

Your telegram about Baku affairs 171 received. I hope you 
understand the tremendous importance of the question and 
will take the most energetic steps to make use of the feeling 
among the Baku people for swift and decisive action. Guar- 
antee safety for those who come over to us. Telegraph 
more details. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



194 



V. I. LENIN 



260 

TO G. I. PETROVSKY 172 

Comrade Petrovsky, 

I am told that the author is an honest man and a Party 
member. Please institute an investigation by dependable 
people. Notify me whom you have appointed. 

Lenin 

13/11. 

Written on February 13, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



261 

TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY 
COUNCIL OF THE EASTERN FRONT 

The retreat of the 2nd Army causes me great concern. 
I have spoken to Vatsetis, who will soon go to Vyatka. 
Please let me know what measures you are taking and 
what is the position regarding the hundred companies sent 
to join you. Second. I hope that you will do the maximum 
possible for food supply and give good army forces to Tse- 
komprodarm.* The main thing is to avoid friction with 
them. Report whether harmonious work has been arranged. 
Third. How do matters stand with regard to that secret 
business Gusev sent me a letter about by special messenger? 

Lenin 

February 14 

Written on February 14, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten copy 



Central Commission for Food Supply of the Red Army. — Ed. 



TO YELATMA UYEZD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. FEBRUARY 18, 1919 195 



262 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

18. II. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I have just heard something about the district Soviet 
having evicted Vera Ivanovna Zasulich and other prominent 
revolutionaries from the Writers' House. Why, this is a 
disgrace! Can it be true? 173 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



263 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE YELATMA UYEZD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 174 

18. II. 1919 

Uyezd Executive Committee 
Yelatma 

Mikhail Mitrofanovich Fedoseyev of Azeyevo complains 
that you have nationalised his printing-press, refusing on 
February 6, reference No. 455, both repayment for the 
printing-press and compensation for removing from work 
his two girl apprentices and the woman binder Report 
immediately whether these facts are true, whether it is 
true that the printing-press is standing idle at Sasovo in a 
shed. Please discuss whether Fedoseyev can be put to typo- 
graphical work or allowed to set up an association of work- 
ers and conduct controlled management of his former 
printing-press in full subordination to the Soviet. 175 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



196 



V. I. LENIN 



264 

TELEGRAM TO P. I. STUCKA AND J. A. BERZIN 

19. II. 1919 

Stucka, Berzin 

Soviet Government of Latvia 

Riga 

I welcome the decision of the German workers in Riga 
to publish in serial form the collected works of Liebknecht 
and Luxemburg. I hope you will give them every assistance 
and expedite it, and send me a copy. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

265 

TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV 

19. II. 1919 

Gusev 

Front Headquarters 
Arzamas 

Reply to coded message received, but not a word in 
it about food and your measures to eliminate friction and 
step up transport. Reply. 

As for the Bashkirs, you are right to demand either 
disarming or immediate operations against Kolchak. 176 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

266 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 

21. II. 1919 

Comrade Kamenev, 

The bearer is the Chairman of the Samara Gubernia 
Executive Committee.* He has very interesting diagrams 
and data about food. 



*This refers to A. P. Galaktionov.— Ed. 



CERTIFICATE TO REPRESENTATIVES OF DANILOV TEXTILE MILL 197 



I advise getting him to report for a large number of Mos- 
cow workers. There is plenty of grain. That's a fact. It 
will do them good to hear it. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published on December 29, Printed from the original 

1957, in the newspaper 
Volzhskaya Kommuna No. 304 



267 

TO THE TEACHERS OF TVER GUBERNIA 177 

Comrade Ramensky 
Representative of Tver Gubernia 

Tell the teachers of Tver Gubernia that the kulaks have 
their grain and that the task of Soviet power is to turn 
this grain over to the working people. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

22/11. 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the copy written 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 in an unknown hand 



268 

CERTIFICATE TO REPRESENTATIVES 
OF THE DANILOV TEXTILE MILL 

24. II. 1919 

This is to certify that comrades representing the Danilov 
Textile Mill visited me on the question of issuing to them 
a ration in textiles. Since this question has been decided 
by the Presidium of the Central Executive Committee, 
which, under the Constitution, stands above the Council of 
People's Commissars, neither I, as Chairman of the C.P.C., 



198 



V. I. LENIN 



nor the Council of People's Commissars have the right to 
alter this decision. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



269 

TELEGRAMS TO M. K. VLADIMIROV 



Vladimirov 

The Council of Defence has decided that if the Revolu- 
tionary Military Council of the Republic fails, within two 
days, to present a reasoned decision in favour of the Povo- 
rino-Tsaritsyn line, we shall give priority to the Liski- 
Likhaya line. The Commissariat for Railways plainly states 
that there cannot be enough materials for restoring the 
bridges of both lines. I fully agree with this decision of 
the Council of Defence, but if you can perform a miracle 
by contriving to repair the Povorino-Tsaritsyn line in 
addition to the Liski-Likhaya line, you will indeed be a 
miracle worker. 

Lenin 



I personally agree to leave you if you undertake to re- 
store both lines, as you write. I shall try today to get in 
touch with Tsyurupa and Sverdlov, and if we arrive at 
a different decision I shall telegraph you immediately. 
Probably Nevsky did not know what materials you can get 
from the south. I shall pass on to him both your memos. 

Lenin 

Written on February 26, 1919 
Sent to Voronezh 

First published in 1942 The first telegram 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV is printed from 

the original, the second 
from the text 
of the telegraph form 



TO A. I. SVIDERSKY. FEBRUARY-MARCH 1919 



199 



270 

TELEGRAM TO S. Y. TSEKHANOVSKY 178 

26. II. 1919 

Tsekhanovsky, Chairman of the Executive Committee 
Rudnya 

Copy to Gubernia Executive Committee, Mogilev 

I can receive you, if not personally, then through my 
secretary. In my opinion the plan of the Communists of 
Mikulino Volost is not bad, but it is desirable to have at 
least a brief written opinion from Orsha and Mogilev as to 
the reasons for their negative attitude. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



271 

TO MARIA KOSTELOVSKAYA 179 

I agree, but if the Military Food Bureau proves guilty 
of delaying, even by one hour, the work of mobilising work- 
ers both for responsible posts and for the food army, then 
all: the members of the Military Food Bureau should be 
kicked out. 

Written on February 27, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



272 

TO A. I. SVIDERSKY 

I think all of you were wasting time "theorising". Rush 
Schlichter, hurry him out to the spot. Things will be clearer 
on the spot. 180 

Written between February 
and early March 1919 

First published in 1925 Printed from the original 

in the book: A. G. Schlichter, 
Ilyich, kakim ya yego znal 
(Ilyich as I Knew Him). 
Kharkov 



200 



V. I. LENIN 



273 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 181 
1 

Decrees cannot be bypassed: the mere proposal invites 
prosecution. 

An exception, though, can be put through the Central 
Executive Committee, and I advise doing this. 

2 

One must know the law: I do not remember through 
whom exceptions go. 

Written on March 4, 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

274 

TO THE C.C. OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 

On the basis of § 3 a Note to be sent to the Polish Gov- 
ernment with assurances that we fully agree to, and in- 
deed desire, a decision by the vote of the working people; 
we desire agreement on this basis, and agree to concessions 
on details, and so on. This to be given as a directive from 
the C.C. 182 

Lenin 

Written between March 4 
and 24, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

275 

TELEGRAM TO P. P. MYSHKIN 

8. III. 1919 

Myshkin, Chairman of the Gubernia Extraordinary Com- 
mission 
Tsaritsyn 

You cannot arrest people for disfiguring a portrait. Free 



TELEGRAM TO A. L. KOLEGAYEV. MARCH 10, 1919 



201 



Valentina Pershikova at once, and if she is a counter-revo- 
lutionary, keep an eye on her. 183 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



276 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 184 

I'm sorry if Khryashchova lives a long way off and has to 
come on foot. 

Tell her tactfully when you get a chance that on days 
when there are no questions of statistics to be discussed 
she can leave earlier or not come at all. 

Written on March 8, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



277 

TELEGRAM TO A. L. KOLEGAYEV 

10. III. 1919 

Kolegayev, Chief of Supply, Southern Front 
Kozlov or present whereabouts 

How many food trains have been dispatched to Moscow 
and how many can you dispatch next month? Has 
everything been done in fulfilment of the Central 
Committee's directive on measures to collect foodstuffs in 
Don Region? Exactly how much has been collected and 
delivered, how is the collecting going? Have you enough 
workers from the centre for food work? Please reply by 
telegraph. 185 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



202 



V. I. LENIN 



278 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 



186 



12. III. 1919 



Comrade Kamenev, 

The bearers are comrades from Sarapul Uyezd, Vyatka 
Gubernia. 

They have brought us and Petrograd 40,000 poods of 
grain each. This is such a remarkable feat that it fully 
deserves quite special congratulations. The comrades, by 
the way, ask to be put in touch with the trade unions. 
Please arrange as soon as possible for them to make a report 
in the Soviet. A paragraph about it should also be given 
to the press. Please phone me when you get this note, and 
then send the bearers to Schmidt and Tomsky. 



Lyd. Al., 

Reply that I have passed his address for decrees on to 
the Bureau of the Central Committee (and send it there), 
and that he can write to me directly to the Kremlin, Moscow. 

Written in March, 
after 17, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Comrade Petrovsky, 

Please send this or a similar telegram, or give orders 
for an inspection through the Gubernia Executive Commit- 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Greetings, 

Lenin 

Printed from the original 



279 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 



280 

TO G. I. PETROVSKY 



tee. 188 



Lenin 



Written in March, 



not later than 22, 1919 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



Printed from the original 



TO PEOPLE'S COMMISSAR FOR INTERNAL AFFAIRS. APRIL 2, 1919 203 



281 

TO TELEGRAM TO V. N. KAYUROV 189 

Secret 
27. III. 1919 

Kayurov 
5th Army 

Your unaccountably optimistic telegram received; I very 
much fear that such optimism, which has already done 
much harm in the east, will do more harm now. Report 
whether you gave your opinion to Trotsky and what meas- 
ures you have taken to improve political work, put heart 
into the reinforcements and inspire them with political 
consciousness. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1924 Printed from the original 

in Proletarskaya Revolutsia 
No. 3 (26) 



282 

TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSAR 
FOR INTERNAL AFFAIRS 

2. IV. 1919 

Comrade People's Commissar for Internal Affairs 

Representatives of Putivl Uyezd, Kursk Gubernia, are 
complaining about the elections. Re-elections to the Soviets 
are required in accordance with the law. Please reply to me 
what you have done — made an inspection, a check-up, 
issued an order, of what kind? etc. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



204 



V. I. LENIN 



283 

TELEGRAM TO G. N. KAMINSKY* 

Kaminsky 
Tula 

I shall at once inform Krasin, and regarding finance — 
Krestinsky. 190 Take rigorous measures in general; regarding 
Red Army men's rations I cannot decide just now, I am 
told they received l\ lbs. The causes of lowered productivity 
must be investigated. Report to us more frequently, both 
you and Orlov. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on April 4, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI of the telegraph form 



284 

TELEGRAM TO THE COMMANDER 
OF THE 10th ARMY 

4. IV. 1919 

10th Army Commander 
Tsaritsyn 

Copy to Divisional Commander Dumenko 
Velikoknyazheskaya 

Convey my greetings to the hero of the 10th Army, Com- 
rade Dumenko, and his valiant cavalry, who have covered 
themselves with glory in liberating Velikoknyazheskaya 
from the fetters of the counter-revolution. I am confident 
that the crushing of the Krasnov and Denikin counter- 
revolutionaries will be carried through to the end. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



* Transmitted by direct line.— Ed. 



RADIO-TELEGRAM TO BELA RUN. APRIL 4, 1919 



205 



285 

RADIO-TELEGRAM TO BELA KUN 



Bela Kun 
Budapest 

I am sending you a copy of our radio-telegram of today 
to Pichon on the question of the exchange with France. 191 

Our Red Cross Commission headed by Manuilsky left for 
France to organise repatriation of our men, but has been 
held up. We promised to repatriate the French servicemen 
still with us if repatriation of our men from France is or- 
ganised and proceeds at full speed. The French Government 
prevented Manuilsky's Commission from organising this 
work. Of the 35,000 Russian soldiers in France, Africa and 
Salonica, France wants to repatriate 900 men now and 
makes empty promises of repatriating our soldiers later on 
as opportunity offers, but in exchange for this, France de- 
mands that we should immediately let all the Frenchmen 
go home. 

France wants to send Manuilsky's mission back together 
with the 900 Russian soldiers, although nothing has been 
done to organise further repatriation. France wants to get 
everything and give almost nothing and get rid of Manuil- 
sky. 

Yet we are aware that our soldiers who remain in France 
and refuse to join the army are subjected to the most mon- 
strous persecution and that Manuilsky has been forbidden 
to establish any sort of contact with them. 

We refuse, on such conditions, to let the Frenchmen go 
home. This is the substance of my radio-telegram, a copy 
of which is being sent to you. The French will shout blue 
murder, and tell the Americans every sort of disgusting lie. 
Please hand a copy of our Note to the American representa- 
tive for his government. 



Lenin 



Written on April 4, 1919 

First published in 1958 
in Dokumenty vneshnei 
politiki SSSR, Vol. II 



Printed from the 
typewritten copy 
Translated from the 
German 



206 



V. I. LENIN 



286 

TO D. I. KURSKY 

It is time we endorsed general standing orders for the 
C.P.C. 

1. For those making reports — 10 minutes 

2. For speakers, the first time 5 minutes, the second 
time 3 minutes. 

3. To speak not more than twice. 

4. On a point of order, 1 for and 1 against, each for one 
minute. 

5. Exceptions by special rulings of the C.P.C. 192 

Written in April, 
not later than 5, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



287 

TO THE SARATOV SOVIET BODIES 

(GUBERNIA FOOD COMMITTEE, 
GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 
CITY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, ETC.) 

5. IV. 1919 

I fully subscribe to the request of the People's Commis- 
sariat for Food that every assistance be given the Saratov 
Council for the Protection of the Starving Children of the 
Red Capitals. For my part, I earnestly request that every 
effort be made to assist this Council for the Protection 
of Children. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO S. P. SEREDA AND A. D. TSYURUPA. APRIL 7, 1919 207 



288 

REPLY TO PEASANTS OF SKOPIN UYEZD 



193 



To impose the extraordinary tax on peasants with below 
average income is illegal. Measures have been taken to 
lighten the taxation of middle peasants. In a few days there 
will be a decree. 194 Regarding the remaining questions, 
I shall make immediate inquiries of the People's Commissars 
and a reply will be sent to you. 



289 

TO S. P. SEREDA AND A. D. TSYURUPA 195 

Sereda and Tsyurupa 

Peasant Filipp Ilyich Bodrov (living in Forest School, 
Sokolniki, Moscow) — formerly a Petrograd worker, over 20 
years in the Party — who has a farm in Venev Uyezd, Tula 
Gubernia (about 20 members of the family living together, 
undivided, a "middle peasant"), assures mc that grain can 
be carted to Moscow over a distance of up to 200 versts 
(his village is 180 versts from Moscow). We have grain, 
he says, we also have surpluses. 

We have missed the winter period, he says, but after 
the sowing (which ends at about St. Nicholas's Day*) there 
will be about a month's free time (before dung carting, 
about a week before St. Peter's Day**). This, he says, 
should be utilised. 

Information should be collected urgently, at once, and 
if there is even a slight chance, this measure should be car- 
ried out, for there will be no consignments from the east. 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 



5/IV— 1919 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 




Printed from the original 



*May 9.— Ed. 
**June 29. —Ed. 



208 



V. I. LENIN 



290 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO V. L. PANYUSHKIN 196 

Comrade Panyushkin 

I direct you to begin entraining the brigade immediately, 
without loss of time, and to dispatch it urgently to its 
destination. I order you to go to the front with the brigade. 
Report fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Written on April 7, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

291 

RADIO-TELEGRAMS TO BELA KUN 197 
1 

April 7, 1.45 p.m. 

Lenin asks you to greet the Bavarian Soviet Republic. 
He requests to be informed urgently and in as great detail 
as possible. In particular about everything concerned with 
land socialisation in Bavaria. 

Lenin 

2 

April 8, 2.15 a.m. 

Please give us details about the revolution that has taken 
place in Bavaria. Apart from the brief radio-telegram 
of the Bavarian Soviet Government we have no information. 
Please let us know how events are developing there and 
whether the new order holds full sway. Please give us the 
information I asked for yesterday about your programme on 
the national question. What is the position in Bavaria as 
regards the agrarian programme of the Soviet Government?* 

Lenin 

Munchner Neueste Nachrichten 
No. 162, April 9, 1919 

First published in Russian Printed from 

in 1965 in Collected Works, the newspaper text 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 Translated from the 

German 



* This refers to the Bavarian Soviet Government.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO N. N. KUZMIN. APRIL 8, 1919 



209 



292 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE KNYAGININ UYEZD LAND DEPARTMENT 

Uyezd Land Department 
Knyaginin 

Copy to Knyaginin Second Zapyansk Society 
Ichalki 

Compulsory measures of any kind to make the peasants 
pass over to the communal working of the fields are imper- 
missible. Non-observance of this will be punished with 
all the severity of revolutionary law. 198 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars* 

Written on April 8, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 

293 

TELEGRAM TO N. N. KUZMIN 199 

8. IV. 1919 

Kuzmin, Military Commissar of the 6th Army 
Vologda or Plesetskaya 
or present whereabouts 

Your telegrams give me the impression that the British 
are deceiving us. Therefore, while by no means anticipating 
the orders your military superior may give you, I, for my 
part, ask that security and vigilance be strengthened to the 
utmost, and every effort be made also to step up our offen- 
sive. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* The telegram was signed also by S. P. Sereda, People's Com- 
missar for Agriculture. — Ed. 



210 



V. I. LENIN 



294 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE KAZAN GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

9. IV. 1919 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Kazan 

Copy to the Military Revolutionary Committee 

Citizens Chernyshov, Sorokin, Semyonov and Herman 
complain from Yadrin that they have been kept in prison 
for 5 months without being interrogated. Investigate com- 
plaint without delay and give me an explanation at once. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



295 

TELEGRAM TO S. K. MININ 200 

Thanks for the news. Please consider a number of 
systematic measures for a stable improvement of the situa- 
tion in Tula. 

Lenin 

Written on April 11, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



296 

TELEGRAM TO THE OREL 
GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 201 

12. IV. 1919 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Orel 

Copy to Uyezd Executive Committee 
Maloarkhangelsk 

Writer Ivan Volny has been arrested. His friend Gorky 
earnestly requests the greatest caution and impartiality in 



TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. APRIL 15, 1919 



211 



the investigation. Can he be set free under strict surveil- 
lance? Wire. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

297 

TELEGRAM TO MAXIM GORKY 

14. IV. 1919 

Gorky 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Chuzhinov, Chairman of the Orel Investigating Commis- 
sion, wires me that Ivan Volny has been temporarily 
released pending investigation of the case. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



298 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 202 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars of the Ukraine 
Kiev 

Copy to the People's Commissar for Military Affairs of 
the Ukraine 

In view of the reorganisation of the health resort system 
in the Republic and in the interests of providing treatment 
and rest at health resorts for disabled servicemen and work- 
ers, exhausted Red Army men and weakened workers 
from the north, urgent measures must be taken to protect 
the southern health resorts won back by the Red Army. 



212 



V. I. LENIN 



Please give immediate orders to chiefs of army units 
operating in the south of Russia and on the Taurida Pen- 
insula to take the strictest steps to prevent destruction 
or looting of medical appliances, buildings, inventory, plan- 
tations, materials and supplies at the health resorts of 
southern Russia and the Crimean Peninsula, Odessa, Golaya 
Pristan, Berdyansk, Moinaki, Saki, Evpatoria, Sevastopol, 
Balaklava, Yalta, Alupka, Gurzuf, Alushta, Feodosia, 
Kerch, and others. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars* 

Written on April 15, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 



299 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

18. IV. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I have received your telegram about the Petrograd work- 
ers' enthusiastic response to the mobilisation. 203 Today I 
had a detailed report from the Commander-in-Chief, and 
I see clearly that unfaltering exertions and extreme speed 
are essential. Take advantage of Kalinin's presence to step 
up and accelerate dispatch of troops from Petrograd. If 
you can, send more also with Kalinin. 

Lenin 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 



* The telegram was signed also by N. A. Semashko, People's 
Commissar for Health. — Ed. 



TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY. APRIL 18, 1919 



213 



300 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 



In code 



Rakovsky 
Kiev 

In regard to the S.R.s, I advise giving no more than 
three and keeping these three pretty thoroughly under 
surveillance of the Bolsheviks, and if they do not agree — 
so much the worse for them, we only stand to gain. 204 
Regarding military tasks, I remind you again of two of 
the most important: a break-through at Bukovina and the 
capture of Rostov. All efforts must be devoted to these two 
tasks — confirm this to Podvoisky and Antonov. As to 
Dybenko's plans, I warn you against any adventure — I fear 
it will end in failure and he will be cut off. 205 Would it 
not be wiser to have his forces replace Makhno and strike 
at Taganrog and Rostov? I advise thinking it over thrice; 
decide yourself, of course. 



Comrade Dzerzhinsky, 

Will you please institute a very strict investigation. 



Lenin 



Written on April 18, 1919 

First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from the original 



301 

TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY 



Lenin 



18/IV. 



Written on April 18, 1919 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



Printed from the original 



214 



V. I. LENIN 



302 

TO THE TAMBOV GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

20. IV. 1919 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Tambov 

I enclose a telegram from Tambov. 207 Please arrange 
another general meeting of these 252 (it is not clear whether 
they are all the members of the co-operative or only some 
of them, and if so, out of what total number) and explain 
the following to them: 

"The Council of People's Commissars has passed a decree 
for the organisation of consumers' communes in the inter- 
ests of correct distribution of products. It is unjust that 
the distribution of products essential for the whole popula- 
tion should be handled only by part of the population, 
as was the case under capitalism. In all countries the co- 
operatives under capitalism embrace mainly the upper 
sections of workers and peasants. It is essential that now not 
only the upper sections, but all working people, every one 
of them, should take part in the distribution of products. 

"There is hardly a single one of the great founders of 
the world co-operative movement who has not pointed to 
the conversion of this movement into socialism. Now in- 
deed this time has come, and all the best elements in the 
co-operatives are in sympathy with the development of the 
co-operative movement as envisaged in the decree on the 
conversion of the co-operatives into consumers' communes 
embracing all the working people without exception. 

"The members of the consumers' communes retain the right 
of fully independent control, as also the right to conduct 
affairs independently. This is why I am asking the 
meeting to revise its decision, to recognise the binding 
nature of the decree of the Council of People's Commissars 
and not to make the workers' and peasants' government have 
recourse to undesirable measures of compulsion. 



"V. Ulyanov {Lenin) 
"Chairman, C.P.C." 



TO I. I. VATSETIS AND S. I. ARALOV. APRIL 21 OR 22, 1919 215 



Read out at the meeting the part in quotation marks, 
and publish it in the local newspaper. Amplify {tactfully, 
without using hard words) what I have said. Wire fulfil- 
ment. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1958 Printed from the original 

in Voprosy Istorii KPSS No. 1 



303 

TELEGRAM 
TO I. I. VATSETIS AND S. I. ARALOV 208 

In code 

Commander-in-Chief Vatsetis and 
Aralov, member of the R.M.C.R. 
Serpukhov 

The advance into part of Galicia and Bukovina is essen- 
tial for contact with Soviet Hungary. This task must be 
achieved more quickly and surely, but beyond this task 
no occupation of Galicia and Bukovina is needed, for the 
Ukrainian army must on no account be distracted from its 
two main objectives: the first, the most important and 
most urgent, is to help the Donets Basin. This assistance 
must be given quickly and on a large scale. The second 
objective is to establish a secure link by rail with Soviet 
Hungary. Inform us of your directives to Antonov and 
measures for checking their fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on April 21 or 22, 1919 

First published in part 
on April 21, 1957, 
in Literaturnaya Gazeta No. 48 

Published in full in Ukrainian 
in 1958 in the book: Borotba 
trudyashchikh Bukovini za 
sotsialne i natsionolne vizvolennya 
i vozz'yednannya z Ukrainskoyu 
R.S.R. 1917-1941, Chernivtsi 

Published in full in Russian in 1961 
in the book: Iz istorii grazhdanskoi 
voiny v SSSR, Vol. 2 



Printed from the original 



216 



V. I. LENIN 



304 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 209 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

This, by the way, is pertinent to what was decided yes- 
terday. 

It is necessary urgently, at once: 

1) to draw up the text of a directive from the C.C. to 
all "nationals" on army unity (integration)*; 

2) to give it also to the press for a series of articles; 

3) re universal military training (100% to be taken and 
not 75% 210 ), prepare immediately, today, a draft decree; 

4) calculate: 24,000 command personnel. At the ratio of 
1 to 10 that means an army of 240,000. 

Verify and take as the norm at once for the Central Board 
of Supply of both Russia and the Ukraine. 

Written on April 24, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

305 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV 

In code 

Sokolnikov 

It is necessary at all costs to put down the revolt quick- 
ly, once and for all. Beloborodov has been sent from the 
Central Committee. I fear you are making a mistake in 
not applying severe measures, but if you are absolutely 
convinced that there are not enough forces for dealing with 
it summarily, then wire immediately and in detail. What 
about promising an amnesty and at that price completely 
disarming them? Reply at once. We are sending trainees 
of two more commanders' courses. 

Lenin 

Written on April 24, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* "Draft C.C. Directives on Army Unity". See present edition, 
Vol. 29, pp. 404-05.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN. APRIL 26, 1919 



217 



306 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

You must: 1) send telegrams today to the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Eastern Front and to the army 
about urgent measures for aiding Chistopol; 

2) speak today yourself by direct line with the Eastern 
Front. 

Lenin 

Written on April 26, 1919 

First published on September 23 Printed from the original 

1925, in Pravda No. 217 



307 

TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV 

26. IV. 1919 

Gusev 

Urgent measures must be taken to help Chistopol. Have 
you given this sufficient thought? Have you exhausted all 
possibilities? Wire. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



308 

TELEGRAM TO K. A. MEKHONOSHIN 

In code 

Mekhonoshin 
Astrakhan 

From the report of 23/4 it is evident that the Ardahan 
and Kars passed from Baku to Guriev with impunity. So 
the Astrakhan people boastfully promise great victories in 
the future, but at the same time they let the enemy through 



218 



V. I. LENIN 



to Guriev. This is outrageous 
either treachery or malicious 
you strictest control, personal 
and utmost vigilance. 

Written on April 26, 1919 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



and even makes one suspect 
sabotage. We demand from 
checking, careful supervision 

Lenin 

Printed from the original 



309 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 211 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

Read this yourself and show it to Comrade Badayev. 
He must be strictly reproved: one more instance of non- 
fulfilment of directives from the centre — and we shall 
prosecute him. This is no joke. 

Get him to sign that he has read this. 

Lenin 

26/IV. 

P.S. Return the enclosed material and this letter. 

Written on April 26, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



310 

PROTECTION CERTIFICATE FOR V. I. TANEYEV 212 

April 26, 1919 
Citizen Vladimir Ivanovich Taneyev 

Protection Certificate 
On the basis of a decision of the Council of People's 
Commissars dated 25/111. 1919 this Protection Certificate 
is issued to Citizen Vladimir Ivanovich Taneyev, 78 years 



TELEGRAM TO L. B. KAMENEV. APRIL 28, 1919 



219 



of age, who for many years carried on scientific work and, 
as testified by Karl Marx, showed himself to be a "devoted 
friend of the people's emancipation". 213 

Citizen Vladimir Ivanovich Taneyev is given the right 
to visit the library of the Council of People's Commissars, 
and all other state libraries are directed to give him every 
assistance in his scientific work and researches. All Soviet 
authorities are instructed to afford Citizen Vladimir Ivano- 
vich Taneyev assistance in the matter of his own security 
and that of his family, home and property. In the event 
of his travelling through the Russian Socialist Soviet Re- 
public all railway and steamship authorities are instructed 
to afford Citizen Vladimir Ivanovich Taneyev and his 
family every possible assistance in obtaining train tickets 
and berths. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 



311 

TELEGRAM TO L. B. KAMENEV 

Kamenev 
Kamenev's train 
Ekaterinoslav 

The directive about the Donets Basin was long ago repeat- 
ed. Have a factual check carried out as to what exactly 
arrived, how much, when and where, or where it is along 
the line. Joffe is needed not in the Crimea, but in the 
government of the Ukraine in the post which Rakovsky 
will select for work against the tendency towards separa- 
tism. As for the Crimea, we shall find someone else, but 
not, of course, Dybenko. 

Lenin 

Written on April 28, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the decoded 

in Collected Works, text of the telegraph form 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



220 



V. I. LENIN 



312 

LETTER OF RECOMMENDATION FOR V. S. MITSKEVICH 

29. IV. 1919 

I hereby recommend Comrade Valentin Sergeyevich 
Mitskevich both as a Communist and as an indubitably 
conscientious worker. I would add that, according to the 
testimony of absolutely trustworthy comrades who have 
observed his work, Comrade Mitskevich has the capabilities 
of an organiser. 

V. Ulyanov {Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

313 

TO THE PETROGRAD ORGANISATIONS 

I have had a detailed report from Vatsetis and the Chief 
of Staff. The conclusion is a sad one. Strenuous efforts are 
needed. The present enthusiasm must not be allowed to 
subside, but must be sustained for at least 2 months and 
still further intensified. Otherwise we shall not finish the 
war, and finished it must be at all costs, as signs of weari- 
ness among the masses (100,000 deserters) are becoming 
more frequent. 

I have discussed the following measures with Trotsky: 

1) Some 3,000 Petrograd workers, unfit for war and 
unarmed, to be sent to the Don. Purpose— to set things 
going, to weaken the Cossacks, demoralise them from within, 
settle among them, set up groups in the villages, etc. 

2) All means and resources to be used more and more to 
get ready a flotilla for the Volga. Especially repairs. 

3) Ditto as regards artillery (without taking away from 
the Karelian line). It is necessary again and again to check 
with the army men whether it is possible to help the east 
with artillery. 

4) Rifles to be collected, especially broken ones (in Tula 
800 a day can be repaired; work is lacking). 

5) Mobilisation of Petrograd workers to be continued 
both for the Ukraine and for the Don. 



TO L. B. KAMENEV. APRIL 1919 



221 



I received a telegram today from Zinoviev on the stop- 
page of several works, big ones, in Petrograd, owing to 
oil shortage. I could not get Krasin on the phone. When 
I do I shall tell him. But I don't think any oil is or will 
be available. I advise moving every one of these workers 
to the Ukraine, to the Don, to the east, for 3 months. 
It is stupid to starve, to perish in Petrograd, when it is 
possible to win grain and coal. 

6) Mobilisation of Party functionaries to be continued, 
too, especially for places close to the front line. 

It is necessary again and again "to rob Petrograd", 
that is, to take people from it, otherwise neither Petrograd 
nor Russia can be saved. 

Various branches of administration and of cultural and 
educational work in Petrograd can and should be weakened 
tenfold for 3 months. 

We shall then save both Russia and Petrograd. 

We have no other workers to equal the Petrograders. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Written in the second half 
of April 1919 

First published in 1932 Printed from 

in the journal Krasnaya Letopis the typewritten copy 

No. 5-6 (50-51) 



314 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 214 

It will not be too late to make rotten concessions in 
June. Tsyurupa asserts that the Central Food Purchasing 
Commission procured several millions (non-rationed), but 
"free procurement" killed it and yielded much less. 

Let us check these figures — en masse. 

1) How much (in actual fact) did the Central Food 
Purchasing Commission procure (and transport) in 2 or 3 
months? 

2) How much did the "free" carriers transport in Feb- 
ruary + March? 

Written in April 1919 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



222 



V. I. LENIN 



315 

TO MARIA KOSTELOVSKAYA 215 

It is to be understood for what it is — a decision of the 
C.C. This is wartime. All must be where things are most 
difficult. 

Written in April 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



316 

TO J. E. RUDZUTAK 216 

Rudzutak: I received this on 2.V!!!!! Give them a severe 
telling-off: a telegram dated 27. IV should have reached me 
not later than 28. IV. (Send me a signed statement from 
the guilty parties that they have been reprimanded and 
warned.) 

Lenin 

2/V. 

Written on May 2, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



317 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 217 

Sklyansky: this is very important; it is necessary to leave 
them part of the 33rd Division and immediately get Vatsetis 
to send an absolutely precise telegram to this effect to As- 
trakhan. 

Lenin 

2/V. 

Written on May 2, 1919 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO AND PODVOISKY, MAY 5, 1919 223 



318 

TO A. Y. BADAYEV 218 

Comrade Badayev, 

Don't be capricious, you are not a school miss. You 
were asked not whether you consider "all your actions" 
"absolutely (!!) correct" (that is ludicrous!!), but whether 
you have carried out all orders from the centre. But you 
are silent about this! Go on working — we do not accept your 
resignation. In future carry out all orders from the centre 
and do not talk unseemly nonsense about "intrigues". 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

4/V. 

Written on May 4, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

319 

TELEGRAM 

TO V. A. ANTONOV-OVSEYENKO AND N. I. PODVOISKY 

Antonov and Podvoisky 
Kiev 

Copy to Rakovsky 

The Central Committee of the Party imposes a stern 
reprimand on Antonov and Podvoisky for having done 
absolutely nothing serious to liberate the Donets Basin, 
despite their promises and repeated insistent demands. The 
C.C. orders that the most strenuous efforts be made and 
warns that otherwise it will bring them before a Party court. 

On behalf of the Central Committee, 

Lenin* 

Sent 5/V. 2.37 hours 

Written on May 5, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



* Followed by the signatures of Stalin and Krestinsky in Lenin's 
handwriting. — Ed. 



224 



V. I. LENIN 



320 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN AND M. M. LITVINOV 219 

Dear Comrades, 

I am sending you my comments. In the absence of es- 
sential differences of opinion, decide for yourselves. My 
advice is: use it for propaganda, for clearly it can serve no 
other useful purpose. Be extremely polite to Nansen, ex- 
tremely insolent to Wilson, Lloyd George and Clemenceau. 
This is very useful, the only way to speak to them, the 
right tone. 

Lenin 

6/V. 

I think both replies are quite correct, in proposing a 
meeting and thanking Nansen. But it seems to me that the 
propaganda side should be more fully developed, taking 
advantage of the fact that the Entente, while easily con- 
cealing from everyone all other documents of ours,* will be 
unable, by way of exception, to conceal precisely this reply. 

I would therefore advise using for propaganda and ela- 
borating in greater detail the separation of (a) the humani- 
tarian and (J3) the political aspect. 

(a) You mention the humanitarian (it seems, only the 
humanitarian?) nature of the proposal? For this all thanks 
and compliments to Nansen personally. If it's humanita- 
rian aims, then do not bring politics into it, dear sir, but 
just start shipping (stress this). Just start shipping! We 
are even ready to pay through the nose for it and wil- 
lingly admit you for control and give you every guarantee. 
Dilate on this, rub it in, make it clear. Appoint a place 
and time for the talks! 

But if a truce, then this is politics] You are an educated 
man, Mr. Nansen, you know perfectly well that every war 
and every truce is politics. This means you have linked the 
"humanitarian" with the "political". You have lumped 
them together! Explain to him, as you would to a 16-year- 
old lass, why a truce is politics. 



* The reference is to the numerous official peace proposals 
addressed to the Entente powers (see present edition, Vol. 30, 
pp. 191-92).— Ed. 



TO G. V. CHICHERIN AND M. M. LITVINOV. MAY 6, 1919 225 



((3) Is it a good thing — to mix the "humanitarian" with 
"politics"? No, it is a bad thing, because it is hypocrisy, 
for which you are not to blame, and it is not you we are 
blaming. For one must talk frankly about politics without 
taking cover behind "humanitarianism". 

And once you have started talking politics, then, by 
your leave, we are obliged to answer you to the point. 

((3 1 ) If the truce is for peace, then you are perfectly aware 
that we are for it. We agreed (even!) to the Princes Islands. 

[We confirmed this to Bullitt who, unfortunately, proved, 

like the whole of American policy, to be a captive of Cle- 
menceau and Lloyd George, for what Bullitt promised us, 
assuring us that America would make Clemenceau and 
Lloyd George come to heel, remained unfulfilled (it would 

be useful to "taunt" Wilson about it!). 22 ^* 

It was not we who torpedoed the Princes Islands, but the 
monarchists and anti-Jew pogromists, the restorers of the 
landowners' estates. Explain, develop, prove these three 
points, that Denikin and Kolchak 1) are monarchists; 2) pog- 
romist thugs; 3) are restoring the estates of the landowners 
and introducing redemption payments for the peasants. 

We agreed to a truce for negotiations about peace, of 
course, with those who are really to blame for the war, 
i.e., with Great Britain, France, America, and not with 
pawns. Explain in detail that it is they who are waging 
war, with their ships, their guns, their cartridges, their 
officers. Reveal in detail the outrageously false "renunciation 
of intervention" in the face of their support (and egging 
on) of the Estonians, Finns, Poles. 

(j3 2 ) Further, if the truce is not for peace, but for a polit- 
ical game — we don't want it. Peace is not a joking matter. 
No one will succeed in fooling us. Develop this point, too. 

Wind up with a resume: if it is politics, then we pro- 
posed a truce for peace, we agreed, we did not torpedo the 
Princes Islands, we are always ready for talks with those 
who are really to blame for the war. 

* If all are against, throw it out (probably this refers to the text 
which Lenin put in square brackets. — Ed.). But in my opinion, it is 
extremely useful in practice to set Wilson at variance with them by 
declaring that Wilson is a pawn in the hands of Clemenceau and Lloyd 
George, in submitting to these two, to this "majority"!! 



226 



V. I. LENIN 



If it is not politics, but humanitarianism, we say thank- 
you, we accept, we invite you to come, to control, and 
will go anywhere you like (time, place) and will pay even 
three times the price in timber, ore, ships. 

Indeed, we must not miss the opportunity of replying 
to Nansen in a way that would make good propaganda. 221 

Written on May 6, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



321 

TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK 

Mezhlauk, Deputy People's Commissar for Military Affairs 

Kharkov 

Copy to Artyom 

I have received from Lutovinov yet another confirmation 
that you are playing at being independent and at local 
republics, by refusing to send immediately to the Donets 
Basin all military forces and all the mobilised workers of 
Kharkov, and by giving as an excuse idiotic prohibitions 
from Podvoisky. I declare that you will be brought before 
a Party court and expelled from the Party if you do not 
give up this game and do not at once send all military 
forces of Kharkov and all mobilised workers to the relief 
of the Donets Basin. Reply in code without delay regarding 
fulfilment, how many you are sending, and when. You 
will be held responsible for delay. 

Lenin 

May 7, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



322 

TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT 
FOR SOCIAL SECURITY 

10. V. 1919 

Please give every assistance and aid to the bearers, Fin- 
nish comrades Torniainen, Haapalainen and Wilmi, in 



TELEGRAM TO M. I. KALININ. MAY 13, 1919 



227 



fixing up 500 men disabled in the war against the 
Whites. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten text 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 signed by Lenin 



323 

TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 

Frunze, Commander, Southern Group of the Eastern Front* 

Are you aware of the grave position of Orenburg? 222 
Today, through railwaymen who had spoken by direct line, 
I was told of the desperate request of the Orenburgers to 
be sent 2 regiments of infantry and 2 of cavalry, or at least 
1,000 infantrymen and a few squadrons to begin with. 
Let me know at once what has been done and what your 
plans are. You will not, of course, regard my telegram 
as violating army orders. 

Lenin 

May 12, 1919 

First published in part on 
July 24, 1928, in Pravda No. 170 

Published in full in 1934 in Printed from 

Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 3 the typewritten copy 

324 

TELEGRAM TO M. I. KALININ 

Kalinin, Chairman of the All-Russia C.E.C. 
Simbirsk or present whereabouts 

Food workers at Atyashevo station are complaining that 
on your orders, bag-traders' potatoes are being dispatched, 
prices have shot up, procurements have stopped. We 
consider it absolutely necessary to refrain from giving 



* The words "of the Eastern Front" are in Lenin's handwriting. 
-Ed. 



228 



V. I. LENIN 



concrete technical directives and orders on food matters 
which cancel the decrees and violate the general food 
policy. In general, do not impair departmental and party 
inter-relations, devote main attention to the peasants. 

On behalf of the Political Bureau of the C.C., 

Lenin* 

Written on May 13, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text in 

in Collected Works, Tsyurupa's handwriting, 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 added to and signed by 

Lenin 



325 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV 

In code 

Sokolnikov 
Boguchar 

We have received from Beloborodov the following tele- 
grams, the first: "The front at Donets has been broken 
through", etc., and the second: "It is necessary to expel 
from the Red Army ranks", etc. In addition there is a 
report on demoralisation in our units and complete lack 
of energy on the part of the local command. Evidently 
the liquidation of the revolt is being more and more delayed, 
yet the threat of the insurgents joining forces with Denikin's 
troops is growing. Are you keeping a sufficiently attentive 
eye on the operations? Should not units be added from the 
reserves of the Southern Front? How many of the 214 Com- 
munists Smilga sent to the south in April and May have 
been used for this purpose? What new effective measures 
have been taken to put an end to the revolt and when can 
one expect it to be put down? Are the peasants south of 



* The words "Simbirsk or present whereabouts" in the address, 
and the text of the telegram from the words "In general", are in 
Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO A. V. LUNACHARSKY. MAY 15, 1919 



229 



the revolt being mobilised?* The case of the General Staff 
member ...** must be investigated. We await a reply. 

Lenin 
Sklyansky 

Written on May 14, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Sklyansky's 

handwriting 



326 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

15. V. 1919 

Trotsky 

I am very glad about the energetic measures for sup- 
pressing the revolt and particularly about the assignment 
of the 33rd Division for this purpose. In my opinion, the 
utmost should be done to make use of the feeling against 
Grigoriev for maximum and speediest pressure on the Do- 
nets Basin. Unless we capture Rostov soon we shall not 
be able to bear the remaining burdens. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



327 

TELEGRAM TO A. V. LUNACHARSKY 

15. V. 1919 

Gubernia Executive Committee 

Kostroma 

for Lunacharsky 

I have asked the Commissariat for Food to report about 
relief measures. 223 I fear that the revolt in the Ukraine 



* From the words "and when" the text is written in an unknown 
hand.— Ed. 

** The name is illegible.— Ed. 



230 



V. I. LENIN 



will hinder the administration of relief, as the situation is 
deteriorating. 224 Push ahead vigorously with mass migra- 
tion to the Don. 225 Get in touch with Sereda. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



328 

TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE ALL-RUSSIA 
CENTRAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

15. V. 1919 

Comrades Serebryakov, Stalin and the other members of 
the Presidium of the C.E.C. 

Tsyurupa receives 2,000 rubles, family of 7, dinners at 
12 rubles each (and supper), 84 per day X 30 = 2,520 rubles. 

They are underfed! They take 4 dinners, it is not enough. 
The children are adolescents, they need more than an adult. 

Please increase his salary to 4,000 rubles and give, in 
addition, a grant of 5,000 rubles in a lump sum to the 
family, which arrived from Ufa without clothing. 

Please reply. 

Lenin 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



329 

TO G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV 

20. V. 1919 

Comrade Sokolnikov 

I take this opportunity to discuss the revolt at greater 
length. Your telegram of the 17th (No. 189) distresses me 
very much: You speak only of "demoralisation" of "expe- 
ditionary troops" and not a word about the division (the 
34th, I believe), which was landed to suppress the revolt! 
Not a word! 



TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. MAY 20, 1919 



231 



After the offensive against Petrograd, suppression of the 
revolt, the most ruthless and immediate suppression coute 
que coute, is an absolute necessity. Please do not be diverted 
from this and send information in code twice weekly — I 
shall insist on the dispatch to you of what is required, 
just as I insisted today on an additional telegram about 
(what has already been ordered three times) the dispatch to 
you of Communists from Voronezh and Tambov gubernias. 

Have done with the revolt quickly at all costs! 

Yours, 

Lenin 

We shall push on also with all our might with migration 
to the Don from non-agricultural places to get the farmsteads 
occupied, the rear fortified correspondingly, and so on. 

We shall send trainees as well: I made arrangements 
with Sklyansky yesterday. 

First published in 1934 in Printed from the original 

Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 3 

330 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

20/V. 

Trotsky 

In connection with the coded telegram from the three 
commanders of the Eastern Front, I propose that Kamenev 
be appointed commander of the front, that Kostyaev be 
replaced, and Lashevich appointed instead of Aralov. 226 
Reply about the plenum. I'm afraid Stalin and Zinoviev 
will not be able to attend on the 25th, and to tear you 
away too is harmful. Therefore I propose that the plenum 
be postponed and that we come to an agreement by tele- 
gram. 

Lenin 

Written on May 20, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



232 



V. I. LENIN 



331 

TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK 

20. V. 1919 

Mezhlauk, Deputy People's Commissar for Military Affairs 
Kharkov 

Report regularly twice weekly in code what you are 
doing to liberate the Donets Basin. I fear your energy is 
already flagging, and yet it is absolutely essential that 
Kharkov strain every effort in order quickly and resolutely 
to finish the job. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published on January 20, Printed from the original 

1929, in Krasnaya Zuezda No. 17 



332 

TELEGRAM 
TO THE NOVGOROD GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Novgorod 

Copy to the Extraordinary Commission 
Copy to the Gubernia Commissar for Food 

Apparently, Bulatov has been arrested for complaining 
to me. I warn you that I shall have the chairmen of the 
Gubernia Executive Committee and Extraordinary Commis- 
sion, and the members of the Executive Committee arrested 
for this and will insist on their being shot. Why did you 
not reply at once to my inquiry? 227 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on May 20, 1919 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. MAY 22, 1919 



233 



333 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

In code 
22. V. 1919 

Trotsky 

I have just learned of the break-through of our front at 
Riga. Riga is evidently lost. 228 Most likely treachery of 
the Lettish bourgeois officers. Possibly also preparations 
for a general, determined offensive along the whole Western 
Front. All this obliges us to increase tenfold the attack 
on the Donets Basin and at all costs to put down the revolt 
on the Don immediately. Sklyansky and I will send another 
thousand trainees there over and above the thousand sent 
yesterday.* I advise you to devote yourself wholly to 
liquidating the revolt. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



334 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

In code 

Rakovsky 
Kiev 

The C.C. of the R.C.P. directs that the C.C. of the CP. 
of the Ukraine should not put forward for discussion by 
the Ukrainian Council of People's Commissars such im- 
portant financial decisions as the issue of new currency 
notes or the exchange of Ukrainian rubles without a pre- 
liminary inquiry of the C.C, R.C.P., since such measures 
can be taken only on an all-Russia scale. 



* The words "over and above the thousand sent yesterday" are 
in Sklyansky's handwriting. — Ed. 



234 



V. I. LENIN 



Reply in detail whether you consider it possible to put 
through this directive.* 

Lenin, Krestinsky, Kalinin 

Written on May 22, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Krestinsky's 

handwriting 
with additions by Lenin 

335 

TELEGRAMS TO THE TAMBOV 
AND VORONEZH GUBERNIA MILITARY COMMISSARS 

1 

Urgent, top priority 
24. V. 1919 

Gubernia Military Commissar 
Tambov 

Copy to the Gubernia Executive Committee 

You informed me that you have sent Sokolnikov 669 
Communists and will send 200 on the 22nd. Yet only three 
hundred have arrived. Check this and reply at once. Dis- 
patch must be stepped up most energetically. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

2 

Urgent 
top priority 
24/V. 1919 

Gubernia Military Commissar 
Voronezh 

Copy to the Gubernia Executive Committee 
Report how many Communists have been sent to Sokol- 



The last sentence is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO THE ODESSA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. MAY 24, 1919 235 



nikov. Reply at once. Dispatch must be stepped up with 
the utmost vigour. 229 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text in 

in Collected Works, an unknown hand 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



336 

TELEGRAM 
TO THE ODESSA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

24/V— 19 

Executive Committee 
Odessa 

Copy to Rakovsky, Council of People's Commissars, Kiev 

Allowing foreigners to leave on their own is criminal. 
To let Russians out under the guise of foreigners is a 
counter-revolutionary act, tantamount to treason. Foreigners 
in general should not be allowed out without compensation 
which can only be ordered by the central government. 
Citizens of the Entente countries should not be allowed to 
go, other than by way of exchange carried out by the cen- 
tral government. Not a single Frenchman should be allowed 
to go out until the return of the soldiers from France, among 
whom there are many Ukrainians. Those guilty of violating 
this should be held strictly responsible. Bear in mind that 
the Finnish Government, obviously at the instigation of 
the Entente, is hindering the release to Russia of Russian 
soldiers; therefore do not allow a single bourgeois, a single 
person, to leave Odessa and the Ukraine. Exceptions — 
Chinese workers, Persians, by orders from the centre. 230 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 text, added to and signed 

by Lenin 



236 



V. I. LENIN 



337 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

Rakovsky 

Congratulations on the capture of Alexandria and Zna- 
menka. 231 I emphatically request that the released forces 
be sent to the Donets Basin. 

Lenin 

Written on May 24, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



338 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

In code 

Rakovsky 
Kiev* 

Directive of the C.C. 

Concentrate all forces on the Donets Basin, take all you 
can from the Western Front, reducing to a minimum all 
active operations on your Western Front. Send Pyatakov 
and Bubnov to Kharkov and Ekaterinoslav, for the most 
complete, energetic mobilisation of workers for the South- 
ern Front on their personal responsibility. 232 

Lenin** 

Written on May 28, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten 

copy with an addition by 
Lenin 



* The words "In code", "Rakovsky, Kiev" are in Lenin's hand- 
writing. — Ed. 

**The document was signed also by Krestinsky and Kame- 
nev.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE. MAY 29, 1919 



237 



339 

TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE* 

In code 
29. V. 1919 

Rakovsky for Joffe 

Council of People's Commissars of the Ukraine 
Kiev 

Read this telegram to Rakovsky, Mezhlauk, Voroshilov, 
Pyatakov, Bubnov, Kviring and other prominent function- 
aries. 

I consider it criminal on your part to have persuaded 
Trotsky to leave Podvoisky. 

Not a single promise is being fulfilled: the Donets Basin 
has no reinforcements; the mobilisation of workers is pro- 
ceeding at a disgracefully sluggish pace. You are per- 
sonally responsible for the inevitable catastrophe. All 
prominent functionaries must be taken off their jobs and 
installed in Kharkov and Ekaterinoslav for the total mobil- 
isation of workers; further, one prominent functionary to 
be sent to each army unit for its advance to the Donets 
Basin; and everything set in motion for clearing out uni- 
forms from the stores. The ruin of the entire revolution 
is absolutely inevitable unless there is a swift victory in 
the Donets Basin, for which it is essential to abandon 
routine in the Ukraine, to work in a revolutionary spirit, 
to rally all and sundry, to keep an eye personally on each 
army unit, each step in the work, to set aside everything 
except the Donets Basin, to have three soldiers to one 
rifle. From you not one factual report. 

Lenin 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

Published in full in 1956 Printed from the original 

in the book: V. I. Lenin, 
Voyennaya perepiska, 
Moscow 



Transmitted by direct line. — Ed. 



238 



V. I. LENIN 



340 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 



Trotsky 



I am extremely astonished at your silence at such a 
time when, according to information, albeit not fully con- 
firmed, the break-through in the Millerovo direction has 
reached the dimensions of an almost irreparable catastro- 
phe. 233 What measures have been taken to prevent the enemy 
joining forces with the insurgents? 



TO V. I. MEZHLAUK AND K. Y. VOROSHILOV 

Comrade Mezhlauk and Comrade Voroshilov 
Kharkov 

A reply cannot be given before contacting Trotsky, whom 
Sklyansky is informing by telegraph. 

I confirm that reinforcements must be given to the 
troops of the Southern Front without waiting for uniforms 
or arms, as our Southern Front will see to that. I have 
many times pointed out the catastrophic urgency of this 
matter, but from you I have no exact information on the 
actual number of reinforcements supplied by you to the 
Southern Front. 



Lenin 



Written on May 30, 1919 

First published in 1938 
in the journal Bolshevik No. 2 



Printed from the text 
in Sklyansky's 
handwriting 



341 



TELEGRAM 



Lenin 



Written on May 30, 1919 
First published in 1942 



in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Published in full in 1956 
in the book: V. I. Lenin, 
Voyennaya perepiska, 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



Moscow 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH E. M. SKLYANSKY 



239 



342 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE 234 

I am for expulsion from the Party of people who take 
part in religious ceremonies. 

Lenin 

30/V. 

Written on May 30, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

343 

TO THE ALL-RUSSIA GENERAL HEADQUARTERS 

31. V. 1919 

Comrade Rattel, 

The bearer, Comrade Yevgenia Bogdanovna Bosh, is a 
member of the Council of Defence of the Lithuanian-Byelo- 
russian Republic. 

Rifles and other arms are needed, also military instruc- 
tors for organising workers' battalions in Minsk. 

It is said that the matter is being hindered by red tape 
and so on. 

Please ascertain as precisely and as quickly as possible what 
can and should be given, and telephone Sklyansky and 
myself. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

344 

EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH E. M. SKLYANSKY 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

Why did we not fire on the destroyer? 

E. M. SKLYANSKY'S REPLY 

It was out of range. 



240 



V. I. LENIN 



TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 



Vatsetis must be told by telephone (he will be speaking 
on the phone today with Zinoviev) and ordered to tighten 
things up strongly. 

Written in May or June 1919 



September 23, 1925, in Pravda 
No. 217 

First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



TELEGRAM TO V. I. MEZHLAUK, 
K. Y. VOROSHILOV, G. N. MELNICHANSKY, 
F. A. ARTYOM, G. N. KAMINSKY 



Mezhlauk, Voroshilov, Melnichansky, 

Artyom, Kaminsky 

Kharkov 

It is necessary at all costs to put a stop immediately 
to the habit of holding meetings, to put all work of what- 
ever kind on a war footing, and appoint particular individ- 
uals responsible for the performance of precisely defined 
jobs. There must be military discipline everywhere. The 
Commander and Revolutionary Military Council of the 2nd 
Army should make enquiries about everything of their 
immediate chief, that is to say, Gittis, and put a stop to 
all fanciful schemes for forming special groups and simi- 
lar attempts covertly to restore the Ukrainian Front. There 
are sufficient uniforms and arms both in the Ukraine and 
at the disposal of Gittis. If the chaos, the meetings and the 
disputes about priority are eliminated, then everything can 
be obtained. Report exactly the facts of the fulfilment of 
specific orders, that is, about the arrival of army units 
at their destination, the collection of arms, and so on. 



First published in part on 



Printed from the original 



345 



In code 



Lenin 



Written on June 1, 1919 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY. JUNE 2, 1919 



241 



346 

TELEGRAM 

TO V. I. MEZHLAUK AND K. Y. VOROSHILOV 

Mezhlauk, Voroshilov 
Kharkov 

Copy to Melnichansky, Artyom, Kaminsky 

The Political Bureau of the Central Committee met on 
June 1. In full agreement with Trotsky, it firmly rejects 
the plan of the Ukrainians to unite the 2nd, 8th and 13th 
armies, and to create a special Donets unity. 235 

We demand that Voroshilov and Mezhlauk fulfil their 
direct task — that of building a strong Ukrainian army. 
Tomorrow or the day after, Trotsky will summon you to 
Izyum and give orders in more detail. Report more exactly, 
more frequently and in a strictly factual way what you have 
done and, in particular, how much army property Voro- 
shilov captured from Grigoriev and in other places. 

On behalf of the Political Bureau of the C.C., 

Lenin 

Written on June 1, 1919 

First published in part in Printed from the original 

1942 in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



347 

INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY 236 

Telephone: 

1) To Rosta,* for them to send me tomorrow a written 
report that this has been transmitted by them to so many 
newspapers, 

towns. 

2) To Chicherin, that this should go out by radio in 
German, French and English. 

Written on June 2, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



* Rosta— Russian Telegraph Agency.— Ed. 



242 



V. I. LENIN 



348 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 237 

Zinoviev for Stalin 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Okulov points to the isolation of the 7th Army from 
the Revolutionary Military Council of the Western Front, 
which causes confusion, relieves front workers of respon- 
sibility, and deprives them of energy in their work. Petro- 
grad Military District, subordinated to the Western Front, 
is giving all its reserves to the 7th Army, not giving them 
to the front for the remaining armies. Pozern stays in 
Petrograd all the time, has poor connections with the 
Council of the front, and sets up parallel supply bodies 
instead of utilising the front-line bodies already existing. 
Okulov proposes either the complete subordination of the 
7th Army to the command of the front, or giving it a special 
status of direct subordination to the General Headquarters. 

Knowing Petrograd's constant tendency towards in- 
dependent activity, I think you should help the Revolu- 
tionary Military Council of the front to unite all the armies. 
The other Western armies besides the 7th should be taken 
care of, too. Report what you have done. 

The conflict with Okulov must not be allowed to grow. 
Think it over well, for it is impossible simply to recall 
him. 

Today I learned of the desertion to the enemy of yet 
another Petrograd regiment and of the refusal of two regi- 
ments to attack. Supervision should be strengthened and 
more workers added. 

Regarding foreigners , I advise not to hurry with deport- 
ation. Would not a concentration camp be better, so that 
they can afterwards be exchanged?* 

Lenin 

Written on June 3, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV Sklyansky's handwriting, 

added to and signed by 
Lenin 



* The text of the telegram from the words "The conflict with Oku- 
lov" is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO R.M.C. OF SOUTHERN FRONT. JUNE 3, 1919 243 



349 

TELEGRAM 

TO S. I. GUSEV, M. M. LASHEVICH, K. K. YURENEV 

In code 
3. VI. 1919 

Gusev, Lashevich, Yurenev 

Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 

Simbirsk 

Sklyansky has positively promised to give ten thousand 
rifles in the first half of June. Pay the most serious atten- 
tion to the Orenburg Cossacks and the Bashkirs, for during 
the previous offensive we behaved stupidly, missed an 
opportunity, and did not make use of these forces. Mobilise 
them urgently, send an intelligent, cool, knowledgeable, 
experienced man there, pay the greatest attention to this 
and to unflagging, total mobilisation of the entire front- 
line area and the collection of rifles from the population. 

Lenin 

First published in 1934 Printed from the original 

in Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 3 



350 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT 

Revolutionary Military Council 
Southern Front 

The Revolutionary Committee of Kotelnikovo District, 
Don Region, by Order No. 27, abolishes the term "stanitsa" 
and establishes that of "volost", and accordingly divides 
Kotelnikovo District into volosts. 

In various districts of the region the local authorities 
forbid the wearing of trouser stripes and abolish the word 
"Cossack". 

In the 9th Army Comrade Rogachov is indiscriminately 
requisitioning horse harness and carts from the working 
Cossacks. 



244 



V. I. LENIN 



In many parts of the region local fairs for selling peasant 
wares are prohibited. Austrian prisoners of war are being 
appointed commissars in the stanitsas. 

We call attention to the need to be particularly careful 
in breaking up such trivial features of everyday life, which 
are of no significance whatsoever in the general policy, 
so as not to irritate the population. Pursue a firm course 
on basic questions and be tolerant of the archaic survivals 
to which the population is accustomed. 

Reply by telegram.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on June 3, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV an unknown handwriting, 

added to and signed by 
Lenin 



351 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 238 

Comrade Chicherin, 

1) What have you done to help this Indian? 
— in publishing his article? 

— in other respects? 

2) We must push on with summaries, leaflets, maps 
of the partition of the world f by Great ] 

" " " " Turkey -j Britain and Y 

" " " " colonies I France J 

Persia, etc. 

etc. 

3) What about the radio message concerning the "ul- 
timatum" of the British workers? (Vecherniye Izvestia, 
3. VI.) 239 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Written in June, 
after 3, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 

* The words "Reply by telegram" are in Lenin's handwriting. 
Ed. 



TO M. I. LACIS. JUNE 4, 1919 



245 



352 

TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH 

In code 

4. VI. 1919 

Gusev, Lashevich 

Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 
Simbirsk 

I am deeply concerned about the loss of Agryz and espe- 
cially Glazov. Have you taken urgent measures? Have you 
found out the reasons? Trotsky was delighted with the 
3rd Army; what has happened to it? 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

353 

TO M. I. LACIS 

4. VI. 1919 

Comrade Lacis 
Dear Comrade, 

I have received your letter and enclosures. Kamenev 
says — and declares that several most prominent Cheka men 
confirm it — that the Chekas in the Ukraine have brought a 
host of evils, having been set up too early and having al- 
lowed a mass of hangers-on to get in. 

A most stringent check should be made on personnel — in 
this, I hope, Dzerzhinsky will assist you from here. It is 
necessary at all costs to discipline the Cheka men and 
throw out the alien elements. 

When there is an opportunity to send a letter by hand, 
inform me in greater detail about the screening of the 
Cheka personnel in the Ukraine, and the results of the 
work. 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



246 



V. I. LENIN 



354 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

4. VI. 1919 

In view of the growing conflict between all the Petro- 
grad C.C. members and Okulov, and considering that the 
solid unity in Petrograd military work and a speedy victory 
on this front are absolutely essential, the C.C. Politbureau 
and Orgbureau decide temporarily to recall Okulov and put 
him at the disposal of Comrade Trotsky. 

On behalf of the Politbureau and Orgbureau of 

the Central Committee, 

Lenin* 

Sent to Petrograd 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



355 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

In code 
4. VI. 1919 

Stalin 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I think it necessary to release Natsarenus for the Ukraine, 
which is badly in need of workers, while you have a sur- 
plus. Further, I request you to visit the Western Front, 
which has been terribly weakened as regards commissars. 
It is absolutely essential to support the front as a whole. 
Would you not find it useful in this connection to have a 
meeting with Smilga? 



* Followed by the signatures of L. B. Kamenev (written in 
Lenin's handwriting), and N. N. Krestinsky, L. P. Serebryakov, and 
Yelena Stasova, written in N. N. Krestinsky's handwriting. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO A. S. BUBNOV. JUNE 5, 1919 



247 



I have received the material with your letter, and have 
begun to examine it. 

Lenin 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



Printed from the original 



356 

TELEGRAM 
TO J. V. STALIN AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

5. VI. 1919 

Stalin, Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

I am referring the question of Natsarenus to the Central 
Committee. It must be borne in mind that there has been 
a huge deterioration in the south, threatening catastrophe. 
They are disastrously understaffed there, while you have 
enough and to spare. 240 I have informed Chicherin. I have 
no objection, of course, to your orders to shoot back. 241 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



357 

TELEGRAM TO A. S. BUBNOV 

In code 
5. VI. 1919 

Mezhlauk, Deputy People's Commissar for Military Affairs, 

for Bubnov 

Kharkov 

Thanks for the detailed news and energetic effort, but 
the matter must be carried through to the end. Do not 
rely on anyone and remain personally until fully trained 



248 



V. I. LENIN 



units have been brought to their destination or until they 
have joined the front-line units.* 

Lenin 

First published in 1934 in Printed from the original 

Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 3 

358 

TELEGRAM 
TO D. I. YEFREMOV, 
MEMBER OF THE REVOLUTIONARY 
MILITARY COUNCIL OF THE 10th ARMY 

In code 

Yefremov, Member of R.M.C. 10 
Tsaritsyn 

It was not at all a question of illegal organisations and 
by no means of leaving it.** I am surprised that such a 
strange idea could have entered your head. The question 
was that of total mobilisation of all Tsaritsyn workers and 
of using all methods of revolutionary, most energetic war 
with especially stern purging of the rear. Telegraph precisely 
what urgent measures you are adopting. 

Lenin 

Written on June 6, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

359 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. SOKOLN1KOV 

Sokolnikov 

Revolutionary Military Council, Southern Front 
Kozlov or present whereabouts 

Strain every effort to hasten the suppression of the revolt, 



* At the top of the telegram Lenin wrote: "Sklyansky. Bubnov 
wires on 4/VI that he is leaving for Ekaterinoslav. If you know his 
address, readdress this." — Ed. 

** Apparently, this refers to Lenin's telegram to D. I. Yefremov 
dated May 30, 1919 (see present edition, Vol. 35, Document 202). 
—Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH. JUNE 6, 1919 249 



otherwise there is a great danger of catastrophe in view 
of the break-through in the south. Trainees and a battery 
have been sent to you. Report more frequently. 

Lenin 

Written on June 6, 1919 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 

360 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

In code 

Trotsky 

Representatives of the Bashkirs have visited me; they 
ask for their troops to be sent to the east and not to the 
south. In the east, in their home territory, they say, they 
can help capture Chelyabinsk quickly, as the Kirghizes, too, 
will go with them; but in the south they are powerless and 
fear they will achieve nothing. I very much ask you to 
weigh these arguments, which in my opinion are serious. 

Make Sokolnikov hurry with suppression of the revolt. 
We are giving Natsarenus to the south. Podbelsky is work- 
ing well in Tambov Gubernia, where he has roused the Army 
Procurements Department and is procuring 20,000 pairs of 
top-boots. 

Lenin 

Written on June 6, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

361 

TELEGRAM TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH 

In code 

Gusev, Lashevich 

Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 
Simbirsk 

The situation in the south is so grave that it is unlike- 
ly that we shall be able to give you reinforcements. You 
will have to make a drive on mobilisation, sometimes total, 



250 



V. I. LENIN 



in the front-line area, on local army procurements and 
the collection of rifles from the population. Shoot those 
guilty of concealing rifles. I consider the greatest danger 
is a possible movement by Kolchak against Vyatka for 
a break-through to Petrograd. Pay the most serious atten- 
tion to this, send information more often about the front 
at Glazov. Sklyansky and I are sending reinforcements 
there, although Muralov is oddly silent and does not 
himself ask for reinforcements. 

Lenin 

Written on June 6, 1919 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1933, in Pravda No. 53 

362 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

8/VI, 2.30 a.m. 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

I have just received a telegram from Stalin and Zino- 
viev. I hope you have already issued orders (it is essential^. 
extremity! l h or %, i.e., 2 regiments from the Archangel 
Front, 1 from the Eastern) and have already replied to Zi- 
noviev. If not, telephone him. 

The capture of Izhevsk allows more to be taken from the 
east (from the southern group of the east, of course). 

Send me a reply. 

More hostages from among the bourgeoisie and officers' 
families must be taken — in view of the more frequent be- 
trayals. Arrange it with Dzerzhinsky. 

Send a telegram to Melnichansky (over my signature) 
that it would be disgraceful to hesitate and not to shoot 
for non-appearance. 

One to Beloborodov, too, that it is necessary not to "re- 
pel", but to annihilate the enemy, and to reply exactly 
where and how many have been taken, what stanitsas, what 
has been cleared and how. 242 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written on June 8, 1919 

First published in 1934 in Printed from the original 

Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 3 



TELEGRAMS TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH 



251 



363 

TELEGRAMS 
TO S. I. GUSEV AND M. M. LASHEVICH 

1 

In code 

Gusev, Lashevich 

Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 
Simbirsk 

Give particular attention to the revolt in the Irgiz 
area.* 243 Take prompt action, mobilise the entire neigh- 
bourhood, discuss whether the insurgents can be crushed 
by means of aeroplanes. Immediate and complete suppres- 
sion is essential. Why doesn't Gusev go out? There must be 
no delay. 

Lenin 

Written on June 11, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



2 

Gusev, Lashevich 
R.M.C., Eastern Front 

I again draw your attention that the regiments going 
to Petrograd must be absolutely reliable — both soldiers 
and command personnel. Attend to this yourselves. You 
must take upon yourselves full responsibility for seeing 
that these regiments do not betray. 

Lenin 

Written on June 11, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Sklyansky's 

handwriting 
signed by Lenin 



* In the text of the telegram as sent Sklyansky replaced the words 
"in the Irgiz area" by the words "in the Orenburg and Ural districts" 
—Ed. 



252 



V. I. LENIN 



3 

In code 
11. VI. 1919 

Lashevich 

R.M.C., Eastern Front 
Simbirsk 

Though we perfectly understand the difficulty of your 
position, we are absolutely compelled to take from you 
more and more. You must therefore exert all efforts to 
step up your work on raising new units hoth at the place 
where you are and in your districts. Wire fulfilment. 

Lenin 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 



364 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

Rakovsky 

Council of People's Commissars 
Kiev 

On June 3, I sent the following telegram to Schlichter: 
"Earnestly request you not to hold up consignments for the 
Byelorussian-Lithuanian army and generally for the Food 
Commissariat, Minsk, and to dispatch them to destination 
in Minsk. Accelerate this in every way. Further, it is 
necessary to increase relief for Petrograd. Please wire me 
fulfilment of both assignments twice weekly. Lenin, Chair- 
man, C.P.C." 

Please 1) investigate the reasons for non-receipt of this 
telegram and prosecute the guilty parties; 2) discuss most 
urgently emergency measures to aid Petrograd with food 
and to collect what was promised; appoint a comrade 



TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. JUNE 16, 1919 



253 



in each volost responsible for fulfilment of this. I await 
a reply. 

Lenin 

Written on June 11, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV and the text 

of the telegraph form 



365 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Stalin, copy to Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Code message received. Both your requests have been 
fulfilled. Two armoured trains and 500 Communists are 
leaving today. Trotsky is here. Telegraph, first, whether 
you have received this reply; second, how you appraise the 
situation, whether you have recovered what was lost, 
and what measures have been taken; third, whether you 
consider possible your arrival tomorrow or the day after 
or quite impossible; fourth, your opinion about the public- 
ation of the document you sent, not in full but parts of it. 
I urge publication. We ourselves will select what can be 
published. I await a reply. 244 

Lenin 

Written on June 13, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, of the telegraph form 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



366 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Stalin 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

According to information from the sailors who captured 
Krasnaya Gorka, an English naval force of twenty-three 
vessels from Libau is expected to reach Kronstadt today, 



254 



V. I. LENIN 



the 16th. I trust you have taken all measures. Send me a 
map of the front. 245 

Lenin 

Written on June 16, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the decoded text 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



367 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) AND THE REVOLUTIONARY 
MILITARY COUNCIL OF THE REPUBLIC 

Comrade Gusev 
Orgbureau of the C.C. 
Comrade Sklyansky 

Will you please examine as quickly as possible the pro- 
posals of Comrade I. I. Ulyanov so that the question 
can be settled without delay. 

Ivan Ivanovich Ulyanov, former Chairman of the Urals 
Revolutionary Committee, a member of the All-Russia 
Central Executive Committee (since X. 1917), urges the 
necessity of raising a division from among the Cossack 
proletarian masses in the area of Saratov and Pokrovsk 
for operation behind the enemy lines, in the steppes beyond 
the Urals. 

Ulyanov himself, Khaustov (Chairman of the Bureau of 
the Yaitsk Revolutionary Committee, in Pokrovsk), two 
brothers of I. I. Ulyanov and a few others, whom he un- 
dertakes to select, would like to take up the formation of 
a special detachment. 

Required for this are: 1) special powers; 

2) arms and supplies; 

3) money. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Defence 

16/VI. 1919 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO THE ORGBUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). JUNE 1919 255 



368 

TO THE C.C., R.C.P. 

Comrade Trotsky is mistaken: here there are neither 
whims, nor mischief, nor caprice, nor confusion, nor des- 
peration, nor any "element" of these pleasant qualities 
(which Trotsky castigates with such terrible irony). 246 
What there is, is what Trotsky overlooked, namely, that 
the majority of the C.C. is convinced that General Head- 
quarters is a "den", that all is not well at Headquarters, 
and in seeking a serious improvement, in seeking ways 
for a radical change it has taken a definite step. That is all. 

Lenin 

Moscow, 17/VI. 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50 



369 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 247 

To the Orgbureau of the C.C: a general strike in Tver, 
then in Klin, all this is creating an extremely menacing 
situation. The following measures must be urgently dis- 
cussed: 

to help the textile workers 
emergency measures are needed: 

1) See that the textile work- 
ers (pay attention) are 
provided with food at 
operating factories. 

2) Mobilisation of textile 
workers ... (10,000) to be 
reviewed. 

3) Distribution of newspapers 
and posters, lectures, step 
up the work of the People's 



when will you discuss? 



food 

Tver (and Klin) especially 
railwaymen and Red Army 
men 

to be supplied with food 
and taken care of. 



256 



V. I. LENIN 



The Tver Military Commis- 
sar is too inexperienced 
in military matters; he is 
very good, but requires as- 
sistance. 



Commissariat for Educa- 
tion. 

4) Tickets (daily) on railways 
for members of the C.C. of 
trade union executives. 



The ignorance of the textile workers is appalling. 
No one takes care of them, they have no newspapers, no 
posters. Something more must be done to improve the food 
situation, something like purchases, etc. 

Written in June, 
prior to 18, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 



370 

TELEGRAM TO M. M. LASHEVICH 

Lashevich 

R.M.C., Eastern Front 
Simbirsk 

Have learned from Smilga about the revolt in Kustanai 
and the advance of insurgents on Chelyabinsk. 248 If these 
are Hungarians and their friends, the crucial moment has 
come. All efforts must be made to join forces. What are 
you undertaking? Are you sending an aeroplane? If there 
is no aviation mixture, probably some could be obtained by 
putting on extra pressure. Wire me in greater detail.* 

Lenin 

Written on June 18, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* At the top of the document Lenin added the words "In the 
special 'Soviet' code, which is known to Sklyansky, Medyantsev, 
Smilga and Lashevich, but not known to army men in general." — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO R.M.C. OF SOUTHERN FRONT. JUNE 21, 1919 257 



371 

REPLY BY DIRECT LINE 
TO V. I. NEVSKY AND L. S. SOSNOVSKY 249 

The right to vote must be given only to uyezd delegates 
in strict accordance with the Constitution. I shall get in 
touch at once with the Presidium of the Central Executive 
Committee. You should both remain until complete quiet is 
restored and the whole work is running smoothly. 

Lenin 

Written on June 20, 1919 
Sent to Tver 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 



372 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT 

In code 

R.M.C, Southern Front 

I have just learned from railwaymen that there has been 
no railway connection with Tsaritsyn since the 18th. The 
last station, they say, is Log. Is this true? If it is, why did 
you conceal it and not report? What measures have been 
taken to restore the situation? Have you given the 10th 
Army sufficient reinforcements, cartridges and shells? If 
insufficient, are you now giving these and by what route? 
The 10th Army complains of a shortage. I draw your atten- 
tion again and again to the extremely great importance of 
Tsaritsyn. Has a directive been given not to surrender 
Tsaritsyn? Are you keeping to it decidedly, or is there a 
different opinion? Reply precisely and urgently. 

Lenin 

Written on June 21, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Sklyansky's 

handwriting 



258 



V. I. LENIN 



373 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

Top priority 
With verification of 
exact time of delivery 
21. VI. 1919 

Rakovsky, Council of People's Commissars 
Kiev 

Copies to Schlichter, Podvoisky 

For the western army, three train-loads of grain are 
absolutely necessary in the next few days. I urgently re- 
quest that the most energetic measures be taken to satisfy 
the need. It is the last extremity. Telegraph. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

374 

TO A. I. SVIDERSKY OR A. D. TSYURUPA 

To Svidersky (or Tsyurupa): You must seize at it with 
both hands. Send the food army there + food supply work- 
ers. 

Start an agitation among the starving workers: to the 
Belaya for 5 million poods. Reply what you are doing. 250 

Lenin 

Written on June 23, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

375 

TELEGRAM 
TO M. M. LASHEVICH AND K. K. YURENEV 

In code 
27. VI. 1919 

Lashevich, Yurenev 

The successes of the Cossack insurgents in the Niko- 
layevsk area are extremely alarming. Give special atten- 



TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. JULY 1, 1919 



259 



tion. Wire what you are doing. Further, discuss whether 
you can send here about a dozen Siberians who have come 
over to us from Kolchak and who are wounded and in gen- 
eral unfit for the war but capable of helping here with agi- 
tation for the war against Kolchak and Denikin. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

376 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

Sklyansky: 

Talk with Vatsetis at once for him to give the greatest 
attention to Penza and the Saratov-Balashov breach. 251 

Lenin* 

Written at the end of June- 
beginning of July 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 

377 

TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 

Frunze 

The development of enemy successes in the area of Ni- 
kolayevsk is causing great concern. Report exactly whether 
you have given sufficient attention to this area. What 
forces are you concentrating and why are you not speeding 
up concentration? Urgently report on all the measures you 
are taking. 252 

Lenin 

Written on July 1, 1919 

First published in 1940 in Printed from the text 

Voyenno-Istorichesky Zhurnal in Sklyansky's 

No. 10 handwriting 



The document was signed also by Trotsky. — Ed. 



260 



V. I. LENIN 



378 

TELEGRAM 
TO THE POROKHOVO DISTRICT SOVIET 

Porokhovo District Soviet 
Petrograd 

Copy to Berkalov, Naval Firing Range, Petrograd 

Impress upon your finance department the impermissi- 
bility of levying an extraordinary tax on the special bonus 
of 50,000 rubles received by Berkalov from the Council of 
People's Commissars for an outstanding invention. 

A decree exempting such rewards from taxation has been 
adopted by the Council of People's Commissars and is now 
in print. 253 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on July 2, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

379 

TO MAXIM GORKY 

5/VII. 1919 

Dear Alexei Maximych, 

You seem to stay too long in Petrograd, really. It is 
not good to stay in one place. It's tiring and boring. 
Would you care to take a trip? We can arrange it. 254 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to Petrograd 

First published on March 29, Printed from the original 

1928, in Pravda No. 75 
and Izvestia No. 75 

380 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

5/VII. 1919 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

Petrograders say the city has a lot of 
(1) shells, 



TO THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD GUBERNIA E.C. JULY 8, 1919 261 



(2) guns on old ships (could do with them for the Vol- 
ga!), 

(3) field guns, up to 300. 

Very strict measures must be taken urgently and a report 
made to the Council of Defence on maximum speeding up 
of shipments chiefly by water (it's a crime that there have 
been no shipments till now. We would have saved Tsarit- 
syn). 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



381 

TO THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD GUBERNIA 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 255 

8. VII. 1919 

To the Nizhni-Novgorod Gubernia Executive Committee 
for dispatch to the Sormovo military and civil authorities 

Please arrange immediately, through reliable Communists 
known personally, a strict and absolutely impartial 

— verification of the enclosed application; 

— draw up an exact, factual description of how many 
houses, apartments and rooms are occupied (by what num- 
ber of persons) by office workers and higher technical 
personnel; 

— what factory building is being requested for a children's 
home and which one it is possible to give; 

— verify exactly who was to have had charge of this, 
the names of the responsible persons, their addresses, as 
well as of those who will carry out the investigation. 

Report fulfilment to me immediately by post or messen- 
ger. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Defence 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



262 



V. I. LENIN 



382 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT 

Top priority* 

R.M.C., Southern Front 
Kozlov 

The All-Russia General Headquarters has given me exact 
information, verified by Kursky, that between May 15 and 
July quotas fulfilled for the Southern Front amounted to 
70,000, and between July 1 and 7 to 22,000. If not received, 
take special measures and notify me at once whether you 
still insist on a call-up of the 18-year-olds. Would it not 
be better for the time being to take others? 256 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

July 8, 1919 

First published in 1940 in Printed from 

Proletarskaya Revolutsia No. 1 the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 



383 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

8. VII. 1919 

Comrade Sklyansky, Deputy People's Commissar for Mili- 
tary Affairs 

Please have the application of Comrade Fyodor Shturmer 
(or Shturmin) 257 investigated and his request granted if 
the investigation confirms his claim. Establish precisely 
what irregularities there were on the part of the local 
authorities and inform me of the result. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



* These words are in Lenin's handwriting.— Ed. 



TO RAKOVSKY, PODVOISKY, ETC. JULY 11, 1919 



263 



Enclosures: 

1) certificate dated 20. VI. 1919, 

2) certificate No. 96 dated 29. IV. 1919, 

3) F. Shturmer's letter. 



First published in 1933 



Printed from the original 



in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



384 

TELEGRAM TO V. A. RADUS-ZENKOVICH 

Top priority 



Zenkovich, Chairman, Gubernia Executive Committee 
Saratov 

To be shown also to Yaroslavsky, Krylenko, Plaksin and 
the Gubernia Food Commissar 

Please verify at once through absolutely reliable and 
impartial persons whather it is true that Sergei Malyshev 
is working excellently in Volsk and Balakovo with a barge- 
shop, further whether it is true that there is a huge crop 
on the left bank of the Volga, and that there are not enough 
people for harvesting work. How many thousands, and 
when, are needed from the northern gubernias? Petrograd 
and Moscow are without grain. Heroic measures needed. 
Wire exact reply immediately. 



TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY, N. I. PODVOISKY, 
AND TO ALL UKRAINIAN MILITARY COMMISSARS 



Comrades Rakovsky, Podvoisky and all Ukrainian Mili- 
tary Commissars 
Kiev 

Copy to Meshcheryakov 

People's Commissariat for Agriculture 

According to available information, in state farms of 
the Ukrainian Republic plundering and destruction of live 



11. VII. 1919 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



385 



264 



V. I. LENIN 



and dead stock is being practised by individual military 
commissars and army units. This is ruining the farms and 
threatens countless calamities in gathering the rich har- 
vest. On pain of being held strictly answerable, take all meas- 
ures for immediately putting a stop to such criminal activ- 
ities; organise effective protection of the state farms, pros- 
ecute those guilty. Wire urgently what measures taken and 
results. 

Lenin 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

Written on July 11, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten text 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 signed by Lenin 



386 

TO N. P. GORBUNOV 

Find out what has been done to organise the extraction 
of oil from the shales of Syzran Uyezd and of Kazan oil. 258 

Written on July, 
prior to 14, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text in 

in Collected Works, Gorbunov's handwriting 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 



387 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Stalin 

R.M.C., Western Front 

Letter number one received. 

Gittis leaves tomorrow, if he has not already done so. 
Sergo and Sollogub have left. Sergei Medvedev is sick. 
Smilga has issued instructions for more people to be given. 
Regarding the Southern Front, we are taking measures. 



TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY. JULY 16, 1919 



265 



Kamenev, Smilga, Gusev, Serebryakov are going there to- 
day.* 

Congratulations on the capture of Ekaterinburg. 

Lenin 

Written on July 15, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

388 

TO J. HANECKI 

1 

To Hanecki: draft a reply. 259 

2 

To Hanecki: this text will not do. It must be worded 
thus: you have been promised so many millions within such- 
and-such a period. We dispatched such-and-such an amount 
to you on such-and-such a date and will send so much more 
on such-and-such a date. 

Draw up a text on these lines at once. 

Written on July 16, 1919 

First published on April 22, Printed from the originals 

1926, in Izvestia No. 92 

389 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

Rakovsky 

Council of People's Commissars 
Kiev 

"Three hundred each have been sent to Kiev and Kharkov; tomor- 
row one hundred each will be sent for Ekaterinoslav and Odessa. Next 
week we shall send a total of 500, and afterwards 350 a week.** Kres- 
tinsky." 



* Lenin marked off the text of the telegram, except the first and 
last sentences, and wrote in the margin: "In code." — Ed. 

** This refers to the dispatch of money to the Ukraine, in mil- 
lions of rubles. — Ed. 



266 



V. I. LENIN 



In informing you of this answer, I ask you to reply to 
me whether you are satisfied or not, and if not, what pre- 
cisely you do want. 

Lenin 

Written on July 16, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

390 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

17. VII. 1919 

Stalin 

R.M.C., Western Front 

Lentsman and Peterson from Rezhitsa request me to put 
a stop to the renaming of former Lettish regiments. I am 
sending their request to you. 260 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



391 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Moscow 
18. VII. 1919 

Stalin 

R.M.C., Western Front 

Your request will be discussed by the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Republic. Sklyansky says that if 
more is to be taken from the Eastern Front, then it should 
be for the Southern Front. Tomorrow Smilga and the 
Commander-in-Chief 261 arrive from the Southern Front.* 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* Lenin marked off the text of the telegram and wrote in the mar- 
gin: "In code." — Ed. 



NOTE ON INVOICE OF SUPPLIES DEPARTMENT. JULY 19, 1919 267 



392 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT 

19. VII. 1919 
Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 
Simbirsk 

On my behalf please congratulate the 2nd and 5th ar- 
mies on their victories. 262 Concrete measures against the 
guerrilla methods should be discussed in detail with po- 
litical workers and carried out. Report results. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 

393 
NOTE 

ON THE INVOICE OF THE SUPPLIES DEPARTMENT 
OF THE MOSCOW EXTRAORDINARY COMMISSION 



INVOICE 

To Vladimir Ilyich 

From the Supplies Department of the Moscow Cheka 



Quantity 


Goods sold or 


Price 


Sum 


supplied to you 


Rubles 


Kopeks 


Rubles 


Kopeks 


1 pair 
1 — 
1 — 
1 — 


Top-boots 
Suit 
Braces 
Belt 











Totalling one thousand four hundred and seventeen rubles and 75 
kopeks. 

Manager, Supplies Department 



268 



V. I. LENIN 



I am forwarding herewith 2,000 (two thousand) rubles, 
and request — and categorically demand — that this bill be 
amended as it is obviously undercharged. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

19/VII. 

Written on July 19, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

394 

TO V. P. MILYUTIN AND P. I. POPOV 263 

Milyutin and Popov 

Calculate approximately how many thousand million a 
month we would need, if 

(1) grain prices are increased fivefold; 

(threefold) 

(2) the prices on manufactured goods for the peasants 
are not fixed, and increased as much as possible to the 
price limit given by the peasant; 

(3) breadstuffs and manufactured goods are sold to work- 
ers and office employees at the old prices; 

(4) calculations to cover also the Ukraine, the Urals, 
Trans-Volga area, part of Western Siberia, and the Don; 

(5) breadstuff prices are fixed according to districts; 

(6) how many thousand million will be required if there 
is a 10% increase in wages and salaries. 

Written on July 22, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

395 

TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 

25. VII. 1919 

Frunze 

Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 

Our failures and the delays south of Buzuluk, at Uralsk 
and at Tsaryov strike me as very alarming. Please give the 



UNDERLININGS AND INSTRUCTION ON TELEGRAM. JULY 25, 1919 269 



matter greatest attention and inform me more precisely. 
The restoration of the railway to Uralsk* is vitally essen- 
tial. 264 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1941 in Printed from the original 

the book: M. V. Frunze 
na frontakh grazhdanskoi 
voiny. Sbornik dokumentov 
(M. V. Frunze 
on the Civil War Fronts. 
A Collection of Documents), 
Moscow 



396 

TELEGRAM TO N. V. KRYLENKO 

25. VII. 1919 

Krylenko, agent of the All-Russia C.E.C. 
Gubernia Executive Committee 
Saratov 

Delivery quotas must not be violated, for they provide 
bread for the troops. Send everything above the quotas to 
the Commissariat for Food in Moscow. Give exact informa- 
tion as to precise amount of grain and where it is. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

397 

UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION ON 
A TELEGRAM FROM P. I. VOYEVODIN 

... The crops in samara Gubernia are unprecedented for many 
decades. Lack of necessary work hands threatens to ruin the bumper 



* In the text of the telegram Lenin marked off the words: "strike 
me as very alarming. Please give the matter" and "The restora- 
tion of the railway to Uralsk". In the margin he wrote: "In code." 
-Ed. 



270 



V. I. LENIN 



crop now ready for harvesting in Samara Gubernia, which alone 
could feed famine-stricken Soviet Russia. All available work hands 
should be sent immediately to the Volga region; pitch, tar, available 
implements, must be dispatched to the peasants. 

Voyevodin 
Political Commissar 
of the "October Revolution" train 



1) To Sviderskyl 

2) To Glebov \ 

3) To Sereda J 

Written on July 25, 1919 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



All efforts must be exerted. " 
Inform me by telephone 
during the day tomorrow, 
26/7, what has been done. - 

Printed from the original 



398 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY* 

In code 

28. VII. 1919 

Trotsky 

at his present whereabouts 

The Politbureau of the C.C. discussed your telegram 
No. 277/c. It fully agrees with you about the danger of any 
kind of waverings in the firm carrying out of the plan once 
it has been adopted. 265 The Politbureau fully recognises the 
operational authority of the Commander-in-Chief and asks 
you to make this clear to all top-level executives. The Po- 
litbureau appoints Smilga, Serebryakov and Lashevich as 
members of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 
Southern Front in addition to the former ones.** 

First published in part in 1958 Printed from the original 

in the book N. F. Kuzmin, 
V. I. Lenin vo glave oborony 
Soretskoi strany (1918-1920) 
(V. I. Lenin at the Head 
of the Defence 
(of the Soviet Land (1918-1920)), 
Moscow 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



* Transmitted by direct line.— Ed. 
** Lenin wrote further: "On behalf of the C.C, Stasova" —Ed. 



TO BELA KUN. JULY 1919 



271 



399 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Trotsky, Chairman, Revolutionary Military Council 

While in the Ukraine, you, of course, ascertained the 
position there. Please report the state of the troops, their 
capacity to offer resistance to Denikin, whether, at last, 
really serious measures have been taken there, whether 
they are capable of defending themselves, whether they are 
giving systematic instruction to the workers and peasants 
about a secret organisation in Denikin-occupied localities, 
particularly an organisation in his troops, as also mobilisa- 
tion of Ukrainians, and whether the Ukrainian Communists 
realise the full gravity of the situation. 

Lenin 

July 29, 1919 

> ^ A 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

400 

TO BELA KUN 266 

Dear Comrade Bela Kun, 

Please do not worry too much and do not give way to 
despair. Your accusations or suspicions against Chicherin 
and Rakovsky have absolutely no foundation whatever. We 
are all working in full accord. We are aware of Hungary's 
grave and dangerous situation and are doing all we can. 
But speedy assistance is sometimes physically impossible. 
Try to hold out as long as you can. Every week is of value. 
Build up supplies in Budapest, fortify the city. I hope you 
are adopting the measures I recommended to the Bava- 
rians.* Warmest greetings and a firm handshake. Hold on 
with all your might, victory will be ours. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written at the end of July 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



* See "Message of Greetings to the Bavarian Soviet Republic" 
(present edition, Vol. 29, pp. 325-26).— Ed. 



272 



V. I. LENIN 



401 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 267 

Comrade Chicherin, 

I have received your note and the radio message. I don't 
think it is worth while taking this seriously and hastening 
to reply. Let us rather wait and have the laugh on them. 
Today we shall give it to the press as a joke, with a direc- 
tive to the editors to ridicule it thoroughly (hinting: are 
they not going by the news from Budapest?) and call the 
Mensheviks and Socialist-Revolutionaries all the names 
they deserve. We shall talk it over again when I arrive. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written on August 3 or 4, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



401 

INSTRUCTION ON A LETTER 
FROM THE SIBERIAN AFFAIRS COMMISSION 

Council of People's Commissars 

In view of the shortage ol available agitational and propagandist 
literature, which is moreover of little use for Siberia, the Siberian 
Affairs Commission has formed a special Literary Section which 
should in the shortest space of time prepare for the press a number 
of pamphlets, leaflets and posters of an agitational nature.... 

Comrade Vorovsky, 
Please give all possible help. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

5/8 

Written on August 5, 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. AUGUST 7, 1919 



273 



403 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

The Politbureau of the Central Committee, having dis- 
cussed the very serious questions raised by you, 268 orders 
that the directive of the Commander-in-Chief on these 
questions, addressed to the Southern Front and to the 12th 
Army, be carried out. The directive will be forwarded at 
once. 

The Politbureau, for its part, insists that Odessa should 
be defended to the last.* 

On behalf of the Politbureau of the C.C., 

Lenin** 

Written on August 7, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



404 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

7. VIII. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

It has been fully ascertained that only Petrograd can 
provide workers for the cartridge factories. The Sestroretsk 
Works and the Pipe Works must be made at all costs to 
provide the necessary hands at once. Red tape is imper- 
missible, criminal, for without cartridges we are lost. Put 
on all your pressure and see to fulfilment. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



* See also present edition, Vol. 35, Document 220. — Ed. 
** There follows the signature of L. B. Kamenev in Lenin's hand- 
writing. — Ed. 



274 



V. I. LENIN 



405 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU, C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

8/VIII. 

To the Orgbureau of the C.C. 

I have just again received from a reliable source infor- 
mation that board members are starving (for example, 
Markov in the Commissariat for Railways, and others). 
I insist most emphatically that the Central Committee 
1) direct the Central Executive Committee to issue to all 
Commissariat board members (and those of similar status) 
a grant of 5,000 rubles each; 

2) put all of them permanently on specialist's maximum 
pay. 

It's too bad, really, to have both them and their fami- 
lies starving!! 

Some 100-200 people must be helped out. 

Written on August 8, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

406 

TELEGRAM TO YEVETSKY 

Yevetsky, Chief of Supplies, Southern Front 

During July you were sent a considerable quantity of 
uniforms and footwear. 

Despite this, in all the armies on the Southern Front 
some units are without boots or clothing. 

On pain of being held personally answerable, I order 
you to take vigorous measures to immediately distribute 
what has been received among the needy units.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

Written on August 8, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 

* At the top of the telegram Lenin wrote: "Comrade Sklyansky, 
send ciphered or clear, whichever more convenient. 8/VIII. Lenin." — 
Ed. 



TO YELENA STASOVA. AUGUST 13, 1919 



275 



407 

TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA, M. M. LASHEVICH, 
G. Y. SOKOLNIKOV 



Smilga, Lashevich, Sokolnikov 
Kozlov 

Report immediately whether forces are being redeployed 
and concentrated with sufficient energy, whether all nec- 
essary measures for speeding up have been taken. Will 
the operation take place as scheduled or will there be de- 
lay? When are you starting? The Ukrainian situation 
causes me great concern. I await an answer from Lashevich 
to the questions raised in Moscow. 

Lenin 

13/VIII. 0.30 hours 



Written on August 13, 1919 

First published in part in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten copy 

Published in full in 1956 
in the book: V. I. Lenin, 
Voyennaya perepiska, 
1917-1920, Moscow 



408 

TO YELENA STASOVA 269 

Yelena Dmitrievna, 

This is an old Party worker. A very valuable person. 
Drop me a line as to where you think you could place her. 

Lenin 

13/VIII. 



Written on August 13, 1919 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



276 



V. I. LENIN 



409 

TO M. K. VLADIMIROV 

14/VIII. 1919 

Dear Comrade Vladimirov, 

Your being relieved of membership of the Revolutionary 
Military Council does not at all signify even the slightest 
dissatisfaction with you. Nothing of the kind. The Central 
Committee was compelled to do it in order in general to 
make a start at reorganising the R.M.C. of the Southern 
Front. I am sure that nothing will be altered in your work 
in closest contact with the R.M.C. Drop me a line, please, 
saying you have received this letter and how things have 
adjusted themselves along the new lines. Have there been 
any impediments to your work, and if so, of what kind? 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



410 

TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA 

Smilga 

and present whereabouts of the Volsk Revolutionary Com- 
mittee 

I sent you a letter and then received yours of the 16th. 270 
Trotsky is here and will stay for a week or so, I think. 
I hope work with him will go smoothly. Would it not be 
better for you to come here and reach an agreement? Keep 
your temper, don't overdo things. If you do not come, 
send news more frequently. 

Lenin 

Written in August , 
not earlier than 16, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION. AUGUST 23, 1919 



277 



411 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCILS 
OF THE 10th AND 4th ARMIES 

20. VIII. 1919 

Two addresses: R.M.C. 10 
R.M.C. 4 

Copy to Executive Committee of the German Commune 
Marxstadt, formerly Ekaterinenstadt 

Harvesting of grain by the peasants is of extreme im- 
portance for the Republic. Issue strict orders for the peas- 
ants to be protected in every way during harvesting, and 
shoot without mercy for plundering, violence and illegal 
requisitions on the part of the troops. Report fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

412 

TO THE AGRICULTURAL SECTION 
OF THE MOSCOW SOVIET FOOD DEPARTMENT 

August 23, 1919 

I have received from you samples of fruit from state 
farms with report No. 4936 (dated 22/8. 1919), and would 
kindly ask you not to do this in future, not to send fruit, 
etc., but to supply me with information as to how fruit, 
etc., from state farms is distributed: whether it is given 
to hospitals , sanatoria, children, where precisely it goes 
and how much of it. How many state farms have you, what is 
the composition of their managements , how many send in 
reports, how many have sent and for what period, etc.? 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



278 



V. I. LENIN 



413 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

26. VIII. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Please collect quickly all the material about subbotniks 
and send it to me. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



414 

TELEGRAM TO N. OSINSKY 

26. VIII. 1919 

Osinsky 

Executive Committee 
Tula 

Copy to the Commissar of the Arms and Cartridge factories 

Do not carry out any compulsory mobilisation, for any 
kind of work, of workers of the arms and cartridge facto- 
ries, for arms and cartridges are most important of all. 
Report fuliilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



415 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 271 

Notify the Food Research Institute tomorrow by special 
memo that in three months' time they must present exact 



TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. AUGUST 30, 1919 



279 



and complete data on practical achievements in producing 
sugar from sawdust. 

Written on August 26 or 27, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

416 

TELEGRAM TO M. M. LASHEVICH 

Lashevich 

Extremely disquieted by Mamontov's successes. 272 He 
may cause us terrible harm by destroying roads and stores. 
Are all measures being taken? Are they sufficiently ener- 
getic and swift? Report more irequently. 

Lenin 

Written on August 28, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

417 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 273 

30. VIII. 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

Markov told me today that 7 troop-trains of the 21st 
Division will now arrive daily, that the whole of it will 
have come in about 4 days' time (news about it was de- 
layed by the storm which disrupted the telegraph for two 
days), and then one week more will be required for each 
division. He is doing everything to speed up things. 

Ought we not use the whole 21st, or part of it (the larg- 
er), to utterly annihilate all "Lashevich's godsons"? Think 
this over properly. The capture of "Sokolnikov's godson" 
and complete destruction of "Lashevich's godsons" are 
of great, immense importance. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written on August 30, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



280 



V. I. LENIN 



418 

RADIO-TELEGRAM 
TO THE TASHKENT EXECUTIVE COMMITEE 

Executive Committee 
Tashkent 

Copy to all railwaymen 

In view of the forthcoming union of Soviet Russia and 
Soviet Turkestan, it is essential immediately to strain all 
efforts for repair of locomotives and rolling-stock. The 
Council of Defence directs that all forces at depots and 
repair-shops should be mobilised for this purpose. The 
victory of the revolution and of the Red Army should be 
utilised to improve the economic life of Turkestan and 
Russia. Greetings to Red Turkestan. 274 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



Written on August 30, 1919 

Published on September 2, 1919, 
in the newspaper Izvestia 
of the C.E.C. or the Turkestan 

Republic of the Russian 
Soviet Federation and Tashkent 

Soviet of Workers', Soldiers' 
and Peasants' Deputies No. 188 



Printed from 
the typewritten text 
signed by Lenin 



419 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY AND I. T. SMILGA 

Comrade Sklyansky and Comrade Smilga, 

I know perfectly a certain comrade, who is a man of 
absolutely exceptional loyalty, bravery and energy (espe- 
cially as regards explosions and daring raids).* 

I direct: 

(1) that he be given an opportunity to learn command 
practice (all speed-up measures to be taken, particularly 
for the reading of lectures and the like), 

what can be done? 



This refers to Kamo (S. A. Ter-Petrosyan). — Ed. 



TO TROTSKY, SEREBRYAKOV, LASHEVICH. SEPTEMBER 6, 1919 281 



(2) that he be charged with organising a special demo- 
lition, etc., squad to operate behind the enemy's lines. 

Written in the summer of 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



420 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Stalin 

Headquarters, Western Front 

The Politbureau asks you to explain the motives for 
your decision in regard to Marchlewski. We are surprised 
that you countermand a decision of the Central Committee 
all on your own without letting us know. 275 

On behalf of the Politbureau, 

Lenin 

September 1, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the decoded text 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



421 

TELEGRAM 
TO L. D. TROTSKY, L. P. SEREBRYAKOV, 
M. M. LASEIEVICH 276 

Trotsky 

Serebryakov 

Lashevich 

The Politbureau of the C.C., after discussing the tele- 
gram from Trotsky, Serebryakov and Lashevich, endorsed 
the reply of the Commander-in-Chief and expresses surprise 
at attempts to revise the adopted basic strategic plan. 

On behalf of the Politbureau, 

Lenin 



Written on September 6, 1919 
Sent to Orel 



Printed from the original 



282 



V. I. LENIN 



422 

TO ALL MEMBERS 
OF THE BOARDS AND PEOPLE'S 
COMMISSARS OF ALL THE COMMISSARIATS 

I enclose the pamphlet Observe the Laws of the Soviet 
Republic and draw attention to the law promulgated by the 
Sixth All-Russia Congress of Soviets, which is reprinted 
in it. 

I remind you of the absolute necessity of rigidly observ- 
ing this law. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

6/IX. 1919 

First published in 1928 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany VIII 



423 

MARKINGS ON THE REPORT OF K. F. MARTINOVICH 
AND A NOTE TO L. D. TROTSKY, F. E. DZERZHINSKY 
AND THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE 
OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 

... The Revolutionary Military Council failed to pay due attention 

to the reconnaissance report, and the Southern Front Commander 

declared it to be a trifle, saying that even if the Cossacks did break 
through, they would be caught in a trap. 

...As a result of all this, about 290 trucks of Clothing and Equin- 

ment Depot property were left behind in Kozlov and plundered by 

the Cossacks and population. 

In view of this I consider it necessary to insist on a thoroughly de- 
tailed investigalion of the process of evacuation of the institutions 
of the Southern Front Headquarters, and particularly the Clothing 
and Equipment Depot, to be carried out by a commission consisting 
of representatives of the Revolutionary Tribunal of the Republic, 

the Council of Defence, and the People's Commissariat for State Con- 



trol. 



TO MAXIM GORKY. SEPTEMBER 15, 1919 



283 



Comrade Trotsky 

Comrade Dzerzhinsky 

and the Central Committee 

I think the investigation 
the Vecheka. 211 

12/IX. 

Written on September 12, 1919 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



should be instituted through 

Lenin 

Printed from the original 



424 

TO J. V. STALIN AND M. F. VLADIMIRSKY 278 

Comrades Stalin and Vladimirsky, 

An extremely rigid, non-local, speedy Party inspection, 
with workers, should be carried out in Petrograd, one that 
will not be susceptible to "influences". 

Lenin 

12/IX. 

Written on September 12, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



425 

TO MAXIM GORKY 

15/IX. 

Dear Alexei Maximych, 

I received Tonkov, and even before that and before re- 
ceiving your letter we had decided in the Central Committee 
to appoint Kamenev and Bukharin to check on the arrests 
of bourgeois intellectuals of the near-Cadet type and to 
release whoever possible. 279 For it is clear to us that there 
have been mistakes here, too. 

It is also clear that in general the measure of arrest ap- 



284 



V. I. LENIN 



plied to Cadet (and near-Cadet) people has been necessary 
and correct. 

Reading your frank opinion on this matter, I recall a 
remark of yours, which sank into my mind during our talks 
(in London, on Capri, and afterwards): 

"We artists are irresponsible people." 

Exactly! You utter incredibly angry words about what? 
About a few dozen (or perhaps even a few hundred) Cadet 
and near-Cadet gentry spending a few days in jail in order 
to prevent plots like that of the surrender of Krasnaya Gorka, 
plots which threaten the lives of tens of thousands of work- 
ers and peasants. 

A calamity, indeed! What injustice! A few days, or even 
weeks, in jail for intellectuals in order to prevent the mas- 
sacre of tens of thousands of workers and peasants! 

"Artists are irresponsible people." 

It is wrong to confuse the "intellectual forces" of the 
people with the "forces" of bourgeois intellectuals. As a 
sample of the latter I take Korolenko: I recently read the 
pamphlet War, the Fatherland and Mankind, which he 
wrote in August 1917. Mind you, Korolenko is the best 
of the "near-Cadets", almost a Menshevik. But what a 
disgusting, base, vile defence of imperialist war, concealed 
behind honeyed phrases! A wretched philistine in thrall to 
bourgeois prejudices! For such gentlemen 10,000,000 killed 
in an imperialist war is a deed worthy of support (by deeds, 
accompanied by honeyed phrases "against" war), but the 
death of hundreds of thousands in a just civil war against 
the landowners and capitalists evokes ahs and ohs, sighs, 
and hysterics. 

No. There is no harm in such "talents" being made to 
spend some weeks or so in prison, if this has to be done to 
prevent plots (like Krasnaya Gorka) and the death of tens of 
thousands. But we exposed these plots of the Cadets and 
"near-Cadets". And we know that the near-Cadet professors 
quite often help the plotters. That's a fact. 

The intellectual forces of the workers and peasants are 
growing and gaining strength in the struggle to overthrow 
the bourgeoisie and its henchmen, the intellectual lackeys 
of capital, who imagine they are the brains of the nation. 
Actually, they are not the brains, but sh — . 



TO MAXIM GORKY. SEPTEMBER 15, 1919 



285 



To the "intellectual forces" who want to bring science 
to the people (and not to act as servants of capital), we 
pay a salary above the average. That is a fact. We take 
care of them. That is a fact. Tens of thousands of officers 
are serving in our Red Army and are winning victory, 
despite the hundreds of traitors. That is a fact. 

As for your moods, I can "understand" them all right 
(since you raise the question whether I shall be able to 
understand you). Often, both on Capri and afterwards, I 
told you: You allow yourself to be surrounded by the worst 
elements of the bourgeois intelligentsia and succumb to 
their whining. You hear and listen to the howl of hun- 
dreds of intellectuals over the "terrible" arrest for a few 
weeks, but the voice of the masses, the millions, the work- 
ers and peasants, whom Denikin, Kolchak, Lianozov, Rod- 
zyanko, the Krasnaya Gorka (and other Cadet) plotters 
are threatening — this voice you do not hear and do not 
listen to. I quite understand, I quite fully understand, 
that in this way one can write oneself not only into saying 
that "the Reds are just as much enemies of the people as 
the Whites" (the fighters for the overthrow of the capital- 
ists and landowners are just as much enemies of the people 
as the landowners and capitalists), but also into a belief 
in the merciful god or our Father the Tsar. I fully under- 
stand. 

X 

No really, you will go under unless you tear yourself 
out of this environment of bourgeois intellectuals! With 
all my heart I wish that you do this quickly. 

Best regards, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

XFor you are not writing anything! And for an artist to 
waste himself on the whining of rotting intellectuals and 
not to write — is this not ruin, is it not shameful? 

Written on September 15, 1919 
Sent to Petrograd 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



286 



V. I. LENIN 



426 

TO L. D. TROTSKY, L. P. SEREBRYAKOV. 
M. M. LASHEVICH 

Trotsky, Serebryakov, Lashevich 

The Politbureau of the C.C. considers it absolutely inad- 
missible that Selivachov is still without special super- 
vision despite the C.C. decision. We insist on communi- 
cation being established, if only by aeroplane, and on 
Serebryakov being sent to him immediately to act as com- 
missar to Selivachov. 280 The behaviour of divisional com- 
manders in the area of the second break-through is ex- 
tremely suspicious. Take heroic precautionary measures. 

The Politbureau directs Comrade Stalin to talk with the 
Commander-in-Chief and reprove him for the inadequacy 
of his measures to establish communication with Selivachov 
and prevent suspicious negligence, if not treachery, in the 
area of the second break-through; 

— further, to reprove the Commander-in-Chief for the 
extreme passivity of Olderogge and point to the necessity 
of taking measures either by replacing him by a more ener- 
getic commander (discuss the question of Frunze), or by 
sending highly reliable and energetic commissars, or by both. 

Written on September 16, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

427 

TO MAXIM GORKY 

Alexei Maximych, 

Comrade Zinoviev will outline to you a plan of the Com- 
missariat for Foreign Affairs. 281 We should try it. Will 
you please draft a letter after talking it over in detail with 
Zinoviev. 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written in September, 
not earlier than 26, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO E. M. SKLYANSKY. SEPTEMBER 1919 



287 



428 

TO THE DEPUTY CHAIRMAN 
OF THE SUPREME ECONOMIC COUNCIL 

30. IX. 1919 

Comrade Lomov 
or Milyutin 

Deputy Chairmen, S.E.C. 

Comrade Lomov, 

Please forward to the appropriate department 

1) the enclosed document with an instruction to let me 
know what precisely has been done in this sphere, 282 

2) an inquiry as to what has been done to utilise the 
oil occurring (according to Kalinin) within 70 versts of 
Orenburg. 

With comradely greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



429 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

The question of reinforcing the division taken from the 
Eastern Front must be urgently worked up. 

Cannot we add to it 20-30% of new recruits? Mobilised 
workers? Perhaps 5% of Communists, 15% of workers, 10% of 
peasants? Then it would be augmented by 30%. Perhaps this 
is technically admissible (without weakening the whole 
division as regards toughness)? 

This must be urgently considered and decided. 

Further, the dispatch of rilles to the Eastern Front must 
now be stepped up. 

Should not the Eastern Front be given the following 
assignment: to consider and carry out a regrouping of the 
troops so as to reinforce all the divisions by 15-30 per cent 



288 



V. I. LENIN 



and thereby bring the whole army up to its previous 
strength? 

Lenin 

Written in September 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

430 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV* 

2. X. 1919 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Your letter received. Warmly greet you and all Petrograd 
workers for energetic work. Am confident you will carry 
out mobilisation to the maximum extent. 

Lenin 

Petrogradskaya Pravda Printed from the original 

No. 223, October 3, 1919 collated with 

the newspaper text 

431 

TO I. T. SMILGA 

In code by direct line 
4. X. 1919 

Smilga 

Revolutionary Council, South-Eastern Front 

Shorin is cheating, keeping Budyonny for himself and 
in general not showing any energy in assisting the troops 
of the Southern Front. You will be wholly responsible for 
putting an end to this scandalous situation, which is tan- 
tamount to treachery. Telegraph in detail what actual meas- 
ures of serious assistance and serious control over their 
fulfilment you are adopting, and with what success. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* The telegram bears a note by Lenin: "By direct line to Smolny. 
Inform me of the time, at what hour delivered to Smolny." — Ed. 



TO COMRADES OF PETROGRAD GUBERNIA E.C. OCTOBER 10, 1919 289 



432 

TELEGRAM TO THE ORENBURG GUBERNIA 
COMMITTEE OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 
AND GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

8. X. 1919 

Gubernia Party Committee 
Gubernia Executive Committee 
Fortified Area 
Orenburg 

Do everything to help the Southern Front with saddles, 
horses, soldiers. Telegraph what you are doing and will do. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1933 in the Printed from the original 

book: V. Trotsky, 1919 god 

v Sredne-Volzhskom kraye 
(Khronika revolyutsionnykh 
sobytii) 

(The Year 1919 in the mid-Volga 
Region (Chronicle 
of Revolutionary Events)), 
2nd Edition, Moscow-Samara 

433 

TO THE COMRADES OF THE PETROGRAD 
GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

10. X. 1919 

Comrades, 

Comrade Yunosov told me about your case. I heard him 
out attentively and reached the conclusion that the case 
was decided correctly and in your favour, since the person 
who uttered those thoughtless and profoundly unjust words 
had been reprimanded. 

That is enough. You are vindicated, he stands accused. 
I earnestly request and advise you now to put aside all 
recollection of it and forget the whole matter. 

I am sure that all the workers will now make for the 
front. Denikin is pressing hard, the danger is serious. 

With comradely greetings, 

Lenin 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



290 



V. I. LENIN 



434 

REMARKS ON A LETTER FROM G. V. CHICHERIN 



Unfortunately, there 
is almost no real 
centralisation. 

This is altogeth- 
er wrong. ??? 



Dear Vladimir Ilyich, 
Not knowing whether, 
among the mass of ra- 
dio messages, you have 
read about Kautsky's 
book, I am sending you 
this excerpt separately. 
It seems to me, from 
what I am able to read 
of our literature, that 
we have not thrown suf- 
ficient light on the role 
of state capitalism under 
proletarian political pow- 
er, a role which has 
escaped Kautsky. What 
we have is not yet com- 
# 

munism, but state cap- 
italism, with inequali- 
ty of remuneration in- 
cluding piecework pay- 
ment, with forms of 
compulsion, sometimes 
reproducing the old re- 
gime, with centralised 
management even of pro- 
duction and a restricted 
factory self-administra- 
tion. We have a Red Ar- 
my of state capitalism 

with an apparatus of 
very strong compulsion, 
and not an army of com- 
munism.... 



This is not a sign 
of capitalism. 

This is due to the 
forms of struggle 
of the enemy and 
the level of cul- 
ture and not due. 
of capitalism. 



#1 don't think so. We have the struggle of the first 
stage of the transition to communism with peasant and 
capitalist attempts to defend (or to revive) commodity pro- 
duction. 

Lenin 

12/X. 

Written on October 12, 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



TO THE DUTCH COMMUNISTS. OCTOBER 14, 1919 



291 



435 

TELEGRAM 
TO I. N. SMIRNOV AND M. V. FRUNZE 

13. X. 1919 

Two addresses 

Smirnov, Revolutionary Military Council 5 
Frunze, Commander of the Turkestan Front 

Directive of the C.C.: all fronts to be robbed in favour 
of the Southern. Consider extra-urgent measures, for exam- 
ple, speedy mobilisation of local workers and peasants, 
to replace your units that can be sent to the Southern Front. 
The situation there is menacing.* Telegraph in detail in 
code. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



436 

TO THE DUTCH COMMUNISTS 283 

14. X. 1919 

Dear Friends, 

I send you best greetings. Our position is very difficult 
owing to the offensive of 14 states. We are making the great- 
est efforts. The communist movement in all countries is 
growing remarkably. The Soviet system has everywhere 
become a practical slogan for the working masses. This 
is a step forward of tremendous world-historic significance. 



* Lenin marked off the text of the telegram from the words "all 
fronts to be robbed" to "The situation there is menacing" and wrote 
in the margin: "In code." — Ed. 



292 



V. I. LENIN 



The victory of the international proletarian revolution, 
despite everything, is inevitable. 

Yours, 

N. Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the handwritten copy 

Translated from the 
German 



437 

TO V. A. AVANESOV, E. M. SKLYANSKY, M. I. ROGOV, 
F. F. SYROMOLOTOV, V. P. MILYUTIN 

15. X. 1919 

Comrades Avanesov, Sklyansky, Rogov 
(Moscow Soviet) 
Syromolotov and Milyutin 

The Central Committee has instructed a commission 
consisting of Lenin, Trotsky, Krestinsky, and Kamenev 

"to prepare a report on the search for all kinds of 
property suitable for military purposes and military 
supplies, and providing for severe measures of punish- 
ment for concealment". 

This commission decided to set up a subcommission of 
the above-named comrades (from the Supreme Economic 
Council — Syromolotov or Milyutin, or someone from its 
Transport and Materials Department, etc., by agreement 
between us and the Presidium of the Supreme Economic 
Council) and instruct it to draft a decree by Saturday (to 
be submitted to the Council of Defence). 284 

V. Ulyanov {Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Defence 

P.S. Concerning the aims of the decree, Trotsky or I can 
be phoned, if necessary. 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO G. N. KAMINSKY. OCTOBER 16, 1919 



293 



438 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY, N. A. SEMASHKO 
AND L. B. KAMENEV 

15. X. 1919 

Comrades Sklyansky 
Semashko 
L. B. Kamenev 

By decision of the C.C., the comrades named are in 
structed to set up a subcommission to draft a decree 

on a Committee of Aid for the Wounded, which committee 
should be under the All-Russia Central Executive Com- 
mittee. 285 

Submit it to the Political Bureau of the C.C. by Satur- 
day. 

The C.C. regards the importance and extreme urgency of 
such a decree as established and indisputable. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



439 

TELEGRAM TO G. N. KAMINSKY 

The tardiness shown by you and other executives in the 
matter of entraining the cavalry is outrageous. 

I warn you that the functionaries responsible for mili- 
tary work in Tula are obliged to display the greatest energy 
and efficiency, which I do not see in practice. Send me at 
once an explanation of the reasons for the delay. I shall 



294 



V. I. LENIN 



call the culprits to strict account. I demand that the dispatch 
be expedited to the utmost of your power. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



Written on October 16, 1919 

First published in part in 
1960 in the book: 
Tak zakreplyalis zavoyevaniya 
Oktyabrya 
(Thus Were the October 
Gains Consolidated), Tula 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the text 
in Kaminsky's 
handwriting 



440 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

17/X. 

Comrade Trotsky, 

Last night in the Council of Defence we adopted a de- 
cision of the Council and sent it to you in code (it would 
be better for you to use your own code, as Karakhan's, 
used by Zinoviev, causes a delay of several hours). 

As you see, your plan has been adopted. 

But the withdrawal of the Petrograd workers to the south, 
of course, is not rejected (it is said that you expanded on 
this to Krasin and Rykov); to talk about this prematurely 
would mean diverting attention from the struggle to the 
last. 286 

The attempt to envelop and cut off Petrograd, of course, 
will call for corresponding changes, which you will carry 
out on the spot. 

Instruct some reliable person in each department of the 
Gubernia Executive Committee to collect Soviet papers and 
documents in preparation for evacuation. 

I enclose the appeal which the Defence Council instruct- 
ed me to draw up.* 



* This refers to the appeal: "To the Workers and Red Army Men 
of Petrograd" (see present edition, Vol. 30, pp. 68-69).— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE. OCTOBER 18, 1919 



295 



I was in a hurry and it is none too good. 
Better put my signature beneath your appeal. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Written on October 17, 1919 Printed from the original 

441 

INSTRUCTION ON I. N. SMIRNOV'S TELEGRAM 287 

1) Give 30,000 uniforms. 

2) The entire 5th Army to be taken to the south at once, and 
not after the Ishim (for the river Tobol is much larger and 
broader than the river Ishim, and the length of the front 
when transferred to the river Ishim is insignificantly short- 
ened). 

3) Turn the offensive in the direction of the Ishim into 
a demonstration and withdraw (having prepared for this 
in the shortest space of time) to the river Tobol. 

Instruct the Commander-in-Chief to discuss my propo- 
sals 1-3. 

Lenin 

Written on October 17, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

442 

TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 

In code 

Frunze 

Revolutionary Military Council of the Turkestan Front 

Give all your attention, not to Turkestan but to the 
complete liquidation of the Urals Cossacks, even if you 
have to use diplomatic means. 288 Make every effort to 
speed up help for the Southern Front. Could not the Oren- 
burg Cossacks be taken to the front near Petrograd or some 
other front? Report more frequently in code on actual ful- 
filment. 

Lenin 

Written on October 18, 1919 

First published on January 21, Printed from the original 

1937, in Pravda No. 21 
and Izvestia No. 19 



296 



V. I. LENIN 



443 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

In code 
18/X. 

Trotsky 

I think that agreement with Estonia against Yudenich is 
impossible, for she is powerless to do anything even if she 
wanted to. Moreover, Yudenich's base is probably not in 
Estonia, but outside it, on the sea coast covered by the 
British fleet. We have sent you many troops, everything 
depends on the speed of the offensive against Yudenich and 
on encircling him. Strain all efforts to hasten matters. 
The huge revolt in Denikin's rear in the Caucasus 289 and 
our successes in Siberia raise hopes of complete victory, 
if we immensely hasten the liquidation of Yudenich. 

Lenin 

Written on October 18, 1919 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 



444 

TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG 

19. X. 1919 

Goldberg, Commander of the Reserve Army 
Kazan 

Have you received enough men for forming military 
units? Is the work going well? Are all the local function- 
aries helping you zealously?* Read this telegram to them. 
Reply yourself and let them reply to me as well. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 



* The text of the telegram from the word "men" to "zealously" 
was marked off by Lenin and he wrote "In code" in the margin. — Ed. 



TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV. OCTOBER 20, 1919 297 



445 

TELEGRAM TO A. D. NAGLOVSKY 

19. X. 1919 

Naglovsky, authorised agent of the Council of Defence for 
introducing martial law on the railways of the Northern 
Front 
Petrograd 

Copies to Trotsky, Zinoviev 
Ksandrov, 

Markov, People's Commissariat for Railways 

Dzerzhinsky, Vecheka 

Moscow 

For the purpose of integrating supervision over the work 
of the railways of the Petrograd junction in the very near 
future, I instruct Naglovsky to perform the duties of 
specially authorised agent of the Council of Defence 
for introducing martial law on the railways of the Petrograd 
junction within an area of 100 versts of Petrograd and 
order him immediately to take over control of this area 
from Ksandrov. Report fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

446 

TELEGRAM 
TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV* 

Trotsky, Zinoviev 
Petrograd 

Have measures been taken to establish secure radio 
Communication between Kharlamov's group and Headquar- 
ters of the 7th Army? 290 Is this communication sufficiently 



* The document bears a note in Sklyansky's hand: "7n code. By 
direct line at once."— Ed. 



298 



V. I. LENIN 



reliable? What about all the other groups? If our help is 
required, telephone. 

Lenin 

Written on October 20, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV Sklyansky's handwriting, 

447 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 

All in code 

21. X. 1919 

Smirnov 

Revolutionary Military Council 5 
Copies to Pozern and Sternberg 
Revolutionary Military Council, Eastern Front 

Frumkin passed on to me your ideas about the Eastern 
Front being unnecessary. Repeat more exactly. We are 
devilishly in need of command personnel. Further, inform 
me how many troops, considering the offensive you have 
begun, you can give to the Southern Front, and when. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

448 

TELEGRAM TO V. M. GITTIS AND A. I. POTYAEV 

All in code 
21. X. 1919 

Gittis, Potyaev 

Revolutionary Military Council, Western Front 

There are reports that fraternising has begun between 
the Polish soldiers and ours. 291 Check on this as accurately 
as possible and report what measures you are taking* in 



* Followed in the manuscript by the words "to step up frater- 
nisation and" which were deleted by Sklyansky. — Ed. 



TO L. D. TROTSKY. OCTOBER 22, 1919 



299 



order that impostors and enemy ruses shall be rendered 
completely harmless, and so that thoroughly useful people 
or commissars take part in the fraternising. Report every- 
thing you know about the temper of the Polish soldiers.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



449 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

18/X. 1919 

Comrade Trotsky, 

I was somewhat taken aback by Zinoviev's demand 
yesterday for more regiments. Is it true about the Eston- 
ians? 

Nevertheless, I passed it on to Sklyansky, and an order 
has been given to have them sent from Tula (again from 
Tula!). 

It is not safe, however, to take any more from the 
reserves of the Southern Front. Would it not be better to 
search elsewhere? 

It is devilishly important for us to finish with Yudenich 
(precisely to finish — to deal a final blow). If the offensive 
has begun, is it not possible to mobilise another 20,000 
Petrograd workers and exert really mass pressure on Yu- 
denich? 

If there are 5-10 thousand good attacking troops (and 
you do have them), then surely a city like Petrograd can 
give about 30 thousand to follow up, as an aid to them. 
Rykov says that a great deal of property has been "found" 
in Petrograd; there is bread, and meat is on the way. 

It is necessary to finish with Yudenich soon; then we 
shall turn everything against Denikin. 

In my opinion it is dangerous to take units from the 



* The text from the words "so that" to the end is in Sklyansky's 
handwriting. — Ed. 



300 



V. I. LENIN 



Southern Front now: they have started an offensive there, 
and it must be extended. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

P.S. I have just learned from Sklyansky that 2 regiments 
intended for Petrograd have reached Kotlas. We shall 
expedite their movement.* 

New information: this is not true. 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

450 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Comrade Trotsky, 

In my opinion, Chicherin is right. 292 Has it been veri- 
fied that the Estonians are fighting? Is there not deception 
here? Or is it not only White Estonians (officers) who have 
joined Yudenich, people who constitute a minority, and 
an insignificant one, among the Estonians? 

We must think it over ten times, measure the cloth ten 
times, for there is a mass of information pointing to a 
desire for peace on the part of the Estonian peasantry. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

22/X. 

Written on October 22, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

451 

TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL 
BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 293 

To all members of the Politbureau, for signature 

I think the request should be granted and a decision 
taken that either the Commander-in-Chief should be called 



* This paragraph is crossed out in the manuscript. — Ed. 



TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV. OCTOBER 24, 1919 301 



in personally, or the draft directives sent to him for his 
urgent opinion. The Commander-in-Chief to be informed 
about this in writing. 

Lenin 

22/X. 

Written on October 22, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

452 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE OREL EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 

Chairman of the Executive Committee 
Orel 

Copy to the Chairman of the Cheka 

Send absolutely at once to Council of People's Commis- 
sars, Kremlin, Moscow, all manuscripts taken during the 
search at the home of the writer Ivan Volny. 294 You are 
personally answerable for their safekeeping. Telegraph 
fulfilment.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on October 22, 1919 

First published on April 13, Printed from the text in 

1965, in Izvestia No. 88 V. D. Bonch-Bruyevich's 

handwriting, added to and 
signed by Lenin 

453 

TELEGRAM 
TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV** 

Trotsky, Zinoviev 
Petrograd 

The Commander-in-Chief wires rejection of the request 
for dispatch of a brigade over and above the railway regi- 



* The last sentence is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 
** Transmitted by direct line.— Ed. 



302 



V. I. LENIN 



ment and 2 regiments of the 6th Army, of which one is 
already en route. I think this is correct, because there 
is nowhere to take them from, and extremely fierce fighting 
is still in progress in the south near Orel. Far the time 
being, reinforcements of 1,500 will be sent to you. Mea- 
sures have been taken to send Letts in addition, if they 
can be found. It is proposed to give you 600 men from the 
Soviet School. 295 

Lenin 

Written on October 24, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV Sklyansky's handwriting 



454 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE SOUTHERN FRONT 296 

25. X. 1919 

Comrade Smilga and other members of the R.M.C. of the 
Front and Armies 

I strongly recommend the bearer, Comrade Stepan Na- 
zarov, a Bolshevik, whom I have known personally for a 
long time. 

He and other Ivanovo-Voznesensk comrades have formed 
an intelligently organised group (of from 300 to 500 men) 
for all-round service to and revitalisation of the whole 
army. 

I warmly recommend the comrades and earnestly request 
that all measures be taken to ensure they will not be lost, 
but allocated correctly and carefully. I particularly ask 
to be informed of the receipt of this letter and of where 
and how the comrades are assigned. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Defence 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO ALL SOVIET INSTITUTIONS AND MILITARY AUTHORITIES 303 



455 

TELEGRAM TO K. A. PETERSON 



Peterson 

Latvian Commissar for Military Affairs 
Report immediately: 

1) Have you already sent the mobilised men to join the 
reserve battalion of the Lettish division? How many have 
been sent? Was the mobilisation carried out with sufficient 
vigour? 

2) Have you fulfilled the task of sending reinforcements 
to the Lettish regiment, to the 7th Army? Both tasks 
brook no delay. 



456 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE PUGACHEV UYEZD FOOD CONFERENCE 297 

Report at once exactly which villages or volosts have 
completely fulfilled the surplus-appropriation quotas. 



Lenin 



Written on October 25, 1919 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the text in 
Sklyansky's handwriting 



Lenin 



Written on October 26, 1919 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



457 



TO ALL SOVIET INSTITUTIONS 
AND MILITARY AUTHORITIES 



27. X. 1919 



The bearer, Comrade Boris Solomonovich Weissbrot, a 
doctor, is personally known to me. He is an old Party 



304 



V. I. LENIN 



worker. Please treat him with full confidence and give him 
every assistance. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



458 

TO THEODORE ROTHSTEIN* 

18/X. 1919 

Comrade Rothstein, 

It is unforgivable your keeping us so poorly informed. 
To have money and not to engage a secretary to collect all 
socialist literature, pamphlets, and cuttings. To have mo- 
ney and not to arrange for photographing copies in reduced 
size. All this is inexcusable. All this can and should be 
arranged. Otherwise communication and information are 
thoroughly bad. Correct this, and write, if only rarely. 

Best greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

459 

TO N. A. SEMASHKO 298 

Comrade Semashko, 

Discuss this (if need be, with the People's Commissariat 
for Railways and the Commissariat for Military Affairs) 
and reply by telephone whether you are taking action, 
how and when. Urgent! 

Lenin 

27/X. 

Written on October 27, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



* On the back of the document Lenin wrote: "Please send in 
code to Rothstein."— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO AVROV, PETERS, GROMAN. OCTOBER 28, 1919 305 



460 

TO V. A. KUGUSHEV 299 

28. X. 1919 

Comrade Vyacheslav Alexandrovich Kugushev 
Ufa 

Comrade Kugushev, 

I have a favour to ask of you. Lydia Alexandrovna Fo- 
tieva, whom I have known well since before 1905 and with 
whom I have been working for a long time in the C.P.C., 
is travelling to Ufa. 

L. A. Fotieva is quite ill and it is our business to repair 
this "state property" (C.P.C. secretary). Will you please 
take all steps to help L. A. Fotieva get fixed up, have 
medical treatment, and be fed to bursting point. 

Comrade A. D. Tsyurupa has told me that you know 
L. A. Fotieva and will not refuse to help her. 

I thank you in advance; please drop me a line by mes- 
senger (military, for example) that you have received this 
letter. 

With comradely greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

461 

TELEGRAM 

TO D. N. AVROV, J. KH. PETERS, V. G. GROMAN 

October 28, 1919 

Avrov, Council of the Fortified Area 

Peters, Automobile Registration and Distribution Commis- 
sion 

Groman, special agent of the Council of Defence 
Petrograd 

Copy to Comrade Markov, Deputy People's Commissar for 

Railways, Moscow 

Copy to Zinoviev, Smolny* 

In a number of decisions, the Council of Defence has 



* This phrase is in Lenin's handwriting.— Ed. 



306 



V. I. LENIN 



instructed its authorised agent, Groman, and the Petro- 
grad Evacuation Commission, to dispatch daily from the 
Petrograd area 100 truck-loads of valuable freight, in ac- 
cordance with the plan of the Evacuation Commission of 
the Council of Defence. You are directed to provide the 
Petrograd Evacuation Commission with the necessary means 
of transport by putting ten motor-lorries daily at its dis- 
posal as from this day, October 28. Report fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Workers' 
and Peasants' Defence 

Printed from 
the typewritten 
text, added to and signed 
by Lenin 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



462 

TO Z. P. SOLOVYOV 

1. XI. 1919 

Deputy People's Commissar for Health 
Comrade Solovyov, 

1) Look through my remarks and return them, please, 
with your comments. 

2) Are there any statistics as to the total number of 
doctors in Moscow? 

3) Have any data on the physician-population ratio been 
published (where and when)? 

4) — ditto: methods of control over doctors (that they 
are not superfluous, that they are registered)? 

5) Ratio (and number) of doctors in Petrograd? 

6) — in other towns? 

7) Ought we not publish statistics of the number of doc- 
tors and ratio for verification? Briefly, in the newspapers, 
so that everyone can check? 

Greetings, 

Lenin 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV. NOVEMBER 1, 1919 



307 



463 

TELEGRAM 
TO L. D. TROTSKY AND G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

In code 
by direct line 
1. XI. 1919 

Trotsky, Zinoviev 
Petrograd 

The entire military and political situation requires the 
speedy concentration of very great forces near Petrograd, 
in order to crush Yudenich once and for all. I advise that 
this be implemented through the Commander-in-Chief or 
through the Politbureau. 

Lenin 

First published in 1941 in the Printed from the original 

book: Dokumenty o geroicheskoi 
oborone Petrograda v 1919 godu 
(Documents on the Heroic Defence 
of Petrograd in 1919) 



464 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 

In code 

1. XI. 1919 

Smirnov 

Revolutionary Military Council 5 

Report how many divisions can be transferred from 
you, which, and when. Inquire of the Revolutionary 
Military Councils of the 3rd Army and the front. Reply 
immediately. 

Lenin 



First published on February 23, 
1938, in Pravda No. 53 



Printed from the original 



308 



V. I. LENIN 



465 

TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG 

In code 

1. XI. 1919 

Goldberg, Commander of the Reserve Army 
Kazan 

Report on the state of your formations, whether the 
All-Russia General Headquarters has given you everything 
promised, how matters stand as regards combating typhus 
and billeting, and whether help by the Party has expanded. 

Lenin 

First published on February 23, Printed from the original 

1938, in Pravda No. 53 



466 

TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 

By direct line 
In code 

Frunze, copy to Sundukov, Zul 

The struggle against the Urals Cossacks is dragging out. 
I do not see any measures taken to finish with this front 
quickly, despite the fact that I demanded that you con- 
centrate all your attention on this.* I inform you that 
the enemy is gaining strength, using the respite you have 
given him, and trying to end matters by a truce only. 
Report at once what measures you have taken to rout the 
enemy. 

Lenin 

Written on November 2, 1919 

First published on July 24, Printed from the text in 

1928, in Pravda No. 170 Sklyansky's handwriting 



See this volume, Document 442. — Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV. NOVEMBER 11, 1919 309 



467 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Trotsky 

I thought Chicherin had informed you that he was noti- 
fying the Estonians of our offensive against them if they 
let Yudenich in. I think we ought to enter Estland if they 
let Yudenich in, and, if this threat is real, we must speed 
things up by vehement action. 300 Chicherin is against making 
this public, for then the Entente would adopt their own 
measures. 

Lenin 

Written in November, not later 
than 6, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV an unknown handwriting 



468 

TELEGRAM TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV 

11. XI. 1919 

Bryukhanov, Chairman, Special Food Commission of the 
Eastern Front 

Supplies for the starving workers of the Urals are ur- 
gently needed. Report what you have done, how much you 
have provided, and whether these workers can be sent 
out to collect grain beyond Kurgan. Your complaints about 
being short-handed are rather strange. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



310 



V. I. LENIN 



469 

TO THE CHIEF PEAT COMMITTEE 301 

11. XI. 1919 

Re the report submitted for 1919: 

1) It is desirable to publish the results in Ekonomiches- 
kaya Zhizn (and send me 1 copy). 

2) There are plenty of detailed tables, but no summary 
tables: 

— comparison of production in 1918, 1919 and earlier 
(number of days? % of machines in operation? etc.) 

— concise map? or distance from railway stations? 
— conditions for setting in motion all machines? 

— comparable data on production in relation to consump- 
tion (food and manufactures)? 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



470 

TO YEVGENIA POPOVA 

20. XI. 1919 

Comrade Popova 

Manager of the 1st House of Soviets 

Please give a room (one, at least, to begin with, later 
two — for a translator) 

to Comrade Keeley, an American engineer, who has come 
to help the Soviet Republic. 

Please give him a room not higher than the 2nd floor 
and the warmest you have. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO A. S. YENUKIDZE. NOVEMBER 21, 1919 



311 



471 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 

OF THE 3rd ARMY, 
THE PERM GUBERNIA COMMISSAR FOR FOOD, 
THE COMMISSAR OF THE PERM RAILWAY, 
AND THE EKATERINBURG GUBERNIA COMMISSAR 

FOR FOOD 302 

R.M.C. 3 

Gubernia Commissar for Food 
Perm 

Commissar of Perm Railway 
Gubernia Commissar for Food 
Ekaterinburg 

Copy to the Metals Department, Ekaterinburg* 

At all costs provide all workers of the Urals, particu- 
larly the Ekaterinburg district, Kizel and other coal- 
mining districts, with full supplies of essential foodstuffs. 
All army authorities and railway officials are responsible 
for unconditional fulfilment. Reply at once how many 
poods have been supplied, and where.** 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

Written on November 20, 1919 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

472 

TO A. S. YENUKIDZE 

21. XI. 1919 

Comrade Yenukidze, 

Will you please give instructions for a little extra 
food to be supplied in general (and that mentioned below 
in particular) to the following comrades: 

* The words "Copy to the Metals Department, Ekaterinburg" 
are in Sklyansky's handwriting. — Ed. 

** The words "how many poods have been supplied, and where" 
are in Sklyansky's handwriting. — Ed. 



312 



V. I. LENIN 



The first has come to help the Soviet government. He 
is our guest. Assistance is essential. 

The second is a founder of Finnish Social-Democracy. 
An old man. The Finns helped us very considerably before 
1905. It is now our duty to help them: 

1) Keeley, an American engineer, who has come to help 
the Soviet government 

(in particular, sugar, chocolate, confectionery). 
Hotel National, No. 321. 

2) Ursin (founder of Finnish Social-Democracy). 

Hotel Metropole, No. 471 
(in particular, butter). 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



473 

TELEGRAM TO B. S. WEISSBROT* 

Weissbrot 
Samara 

I am passing on your report to Semashko straight away. 303 
We shall try to take all steps. We have mobilised dentists 
as feldschers. I wish you all the best. 

Lenin 



Written on November 25, 1919 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the text of 
the telegraph form 



474 

TO N. A. SEMASHKO 



304 



27. XI. 1919 

Comrade Semashko, 

(1) Please return the enclosed to me with your comments. 



Transmitted by direct line. — Ed. 



TO V. P. MILYUTIN. NOVEMBER 27, 1919 



313 



(2) Have the facts verified (get responsible persons to 
state these facts quickly and accurately above their signa- 
tures). 

(3) Weissbrot's plan. Your amendments or counter-plan? 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

475 

TO V. P. MILYUTIN 

Supreme Economic Council 
Comrade Milyutin, 

Please discuss the drafting of uniform, brief, but essen- 
tial questions (or forms) for printing periodic reports in 
Ekonomicheskaya Zhizn on the results of work for the de- 
velopment of productive forces (the number of employed 
workers; production, extraction; productivity per worker, 
etc.) in all or in the main branches of the economy. 

Let me have your opinion. 

Lenin 

The reports must be divided into 2 parts: 

(a) a part which can only be described (plan, conditions, 
specific features, etc.); 

(b) a part which can and should be expressed in figures. 
Both to be published. 

In the second part, essentials to be selected (for sum- 
maries and comparisons). 

(Cf. an example of vagueness — the Chief Shale Committee, 
report on October 1, 1919.) It is being printed. Where. 
How often. 

(The secret part should be printed in % %; for example: 
October 1, 1919 — 100, number of workers; November 1, 
1919—120, etc.) 

Written on November 27, 1919 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten copy 



314 



V. I. LENIN 



476 

TO THE PRESIDIUM 
OF THE SEVENTH CONGRESS OF SOVIETS 

I think somebody should be elected also from Kiev Gu- 
bernia. 305 

When there is an All-Ukraine Central Executive 
Committee (so far there is none), then they will leave. 
Why should they not be with us so long as there is no 
Ukrainian C.E.C.? 

Lenin 

Written in December, not earlier 
than 5 and not later than 9, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

477 

TO YELENA STASOVA 306 

Y. D., 

A code message must be sent that nobody anywhere should 
ever use the nickname Kamo, which should immediate- 
ly be replaced by another, a new one. The town where 
Kamo is must be mentioned only in code. 

Lenin 

Written in December, 
after 9, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 

478 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

10. XII. 1919 

Orgbureau of the C.C. 

In my opinion, Frunze asks too much. We must first 
capture the whole of the Ukraine, Turkestan can wait and 
make the best of it for a time. 307 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



UNDERLININGS ON A TELEGRAM. DECEMBER 1919 



315 



479 

TELEGRAM TO SH. Z. ELIAVA, J. E. RUDZUTAK, 
V. V. KUIBYSHEV 

In code 
11. XII. 1919 

Eliava, Rudzutak, Kuibyshev 
Tashkent 

Your demands for personnel are excessive. It is ab- 
surd, or worse than absurd, when you imagine that 
Turkestan is more important than the centre and the 
Ukraine. You will not get any more. You must manage with 
what you have, and not set yourselves unlimited plans, 
but be modest. 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



480 

UNDERLININGS ON A TELEGRAM 
FROM A. K. PAIKES AND A NOTE 
TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

The rapid advance of the army demands the immediate organisa- 
tion of Soviet institutions locally. The local comrades are unfamili- 
ar with the development and policy of Soviet power and are not ca- 
pable now of organising them. Contact with the centre being impos- 
sible, the absence of suitable leaders in the regions threatens a 
repetition of stages already passed and an irrational use of Siberia's 

natural wealth. It is essential to send responsible people immediately 
to the Siberian Revolutionary Committee for political leadership 
in the fields of Soviet construction and economy. 

Paikes 



316 



V. I. LENIN 



Orgbureau 
(to Stasova) 

In my opinion, no more should be given to Siberia: we 
have none. Siberia will not perish. Everything to the 
Ukraine. 

Lenin 

Written in December, not earlier 
than 11 and not later than 16, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

481 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

15. XII. 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

I am sending you the decision of the Politbureau. 
Two things: 

1) Cannot 2 heavy sledges (Kegress sleigh-cars) and 2 
light ones be ordered urgently for the Southern Front? 

Urgent. Reply. 

2) Give special attention to the fuel shales near Yamburg. 
It is of prime importance to exert the utmost efforts. 

3) Materials (barbed wire and so on) must not be squan- 
dered or pilfered. 

They will be needed. Attend to it. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

I am writing the article. If I don't finish it today, don't 
wait. 308 

Written on December 15, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

482 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 

By direct line 

Smirnov 

Revolutionary Military Council 
Omsk 

Congratulations on the capture of Novonikolayevsk. 



TO ORGBUREAU OF C.C., R.C.P.(B.). DECEMBER 1919 317 



See that the Kuznetsk area and coal are seized intact. Remem- 
ber, it will be a crime to forge too far ahead in the East, 
when it is necessary with vigorous energy....* 

Inform me of the hour of receipt of this telegram. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

15/XII. 

Written on December 15, 1919 

First published in 1959 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI the typewritten copy 



483 

TO L. B. KRASIN 309 

Send me tomorrow one copy each of the instructions and 
rules, forms of accounting, and other such publications 
of the Commissariat for Railways, 
of its Political Department, 
of its Operational, 

Technical, 

Maintenance 
departments (or boards), 

scheme of organisation (if there is such a thing) of the 
Commissariat for Railways. 

Written on December 17, 1919 

First published on November 24, Printed from the original 

1963, in Pravda No. 328 



484 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

Orgbureau 

I propose either reprimanding the signatories to this 
paper (their names, 32 persons, can be learned from their 
previous paper) 310 



The rest of the telegram has not been deciphered. — Ed. 



318 



V. I. LENIN 



or 

reproving them for their gossip about the policy of the 
C.C., R.C.P., which is a violation of discipline and an 
obstacle to organised and harmonious work; 

— for, without indicating anything concrete, these peo- 
ple are wasting valuable time and diverting attention 
from speediest departure to the Ukraine for work there. 

The C.C. calls on them to cease their gossip and proj- 
ect-mongering and get down to work immediately, strict- 
ly carrying out the policy and instructions of the C.C, 
R.C.P. 

Lenin 

P.S. The signatories must be kept under supervision and 
distributed separately among business-like personnel. Ot- 
herwise there will be squabbling, and not work. 

Written in December, 
not later than 18, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



485 

TO SH. Z. ELIAVA 

19. XII. 1919 

Comrade Eliava, 

I recommend to you the bearer, Comrade P. N. Lepe- 
shinsky, 311 whom I know from abroad, from the Geneva of 
1902, where we fought together against the Mensheviks. 

Comrade Lepeshinsky will undoubtedly assist in just the 
kind of work that should impress upon the indigenous 
population the idea and conviction that Soviet people can- 
not be imperialists, cannot even have imperialist ways of 
behaviour. 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO RYAZAN. DECEMBER 1919 



319 



486 

TELEGRAM TO RYAZAN 312 

Top priority 
Telegram to be handed to the duty commis- 
sar for immediate delivery. Delivery to be 
confirmed to Kremlin, Moscow 

3 addresses: 

Gubernia Party Committee, Gubernia Executive Committee, 

Gubernia Food Committee 

Ryazan 

Dear Comrades, 

At your conference on December 19 you decided to dis- 
patch 800 truck-loads of potatoes within ten days for Mos- 
cow workers and outlined a number of measures for carrying 
this out. A splendid idea, but the crux of the matter is 
how successfully and how quickly you will cope with the task 
you have set yourselves. The working class of Moscow is 
in the throes of starvation. Saving it means saving the 
revolution. The working class of Moscow has been bearing 
the brunt of the struggle against counter-revolution. The 
Red Army has defeated Kolchak and Yudenich, it is now 
Denikin's turn. To enable the Red Army, with the least 
expenditure of time and strength, to cope with this task, 
which will ensure the possibility of ending the war and 
beginning peaceful socialist construction, the Moscow work- 
er has had to make yet another sacrifice. He has had to 
provide for operational needs the transport facilities which 
were intended for the carriage of food to Moscow. In these 
conditions, it is natural that localities surrounding the 
centre of world revolution should come to his aid. All 
Party and Soviet personnel should be imbued with the idea 
that the provisioning of Moscow, the salvation of its work- 
ing class, is their sacred revolutionary duty. On your 
energy and determination depend the gains of the revolu- 
tion. All for food procurement, all for work to load and 
dispatch the trucks. The dispatch and delivery of food 
trains to Moscow is the care of the People's Commissariat 
for Railways. Insistently demand fulfilment of this obli- 



320 



V. I. LENIN 



gation from the local bodies of the Commissariat for Rail- 
ways. To work, comrades! For speedy, drastic, revolution- 
ary aid to the Moscow workers! 



With communist greetings, 



Written on December 21, 1919 

First published in part 
in 1953 in the book: 
Istoriko-krayevedchesky sbornik 
("Uchoniye zapiski" No. 11) 
(Historical Regional Studies 
(Transactions No. 11)), 
Ryazan 

Published in full in 1957 
in the book: Borba 
za ustanovleniye i ukrepleniye 
Sovetsleoi vlasti v Ryazanskoi 

gubernii (1917-1920) 
(Struggle for the Establishment 
and Consolidation of Soviet Power 
in Ryazan Gubernia (1917-1920)), 
Moscow 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 



Printed from 
the text of the 
telegraph tape 



487 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 313 

1) A short time limit should be set for drafting the in- 
struction. 

2) It should be submitted to the Narrow Council, as 
the circular is badly drafted. 

3) A report on the results of taking over churches for 
schools to be made in 3 months' time. 



conditions of taking over 
and accounting? 

Lenin 

22/XII. 

Written on December 22, 1919 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 



321 



488 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

23/XII. 

Comrade Zinoviev, 
Your letter of 20/XII received. 

About Petrograd, arrange everything with Trotsky. It is 
evidently necessary to preserve and restore all defence 
installations (I hear they are already stealing barbed wire, 
etc.), and to devise a system of weekly mobilisations (ei- 
ther "alerts" or musters), in order to keep Petrograd in a 
state of preparedness. This must be carefully thought out. 

Food supply is at a complete standstill because of trans- 
port. Repairs to locomotives and trucks!! 

About shale, it is splendid that you have already start- 
ed. But I was surprised at your writing about the trans- 
port of shale. Shale does not stand transport (unless it is 
for gas: shale is said to yield more gas than coal does), and 
electricity should be laid on locally and a distillation plant 
set up on the spot to obtain oil from shale. That is what I 
have been told here. And I thought that Petrograd with all 
its resources could cope both with the task of electrification 
and of distillation. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

N.B. Cannot blockhouses be erected for the defence of 
Petrograd? I am sending you and Trotsky a report on this 
subject. 

Why are there not more sleigh-cars? There are said to be 
over 100 tracks? 

Written on December 23, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

489 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 314 

Put on the agenda of the Council of Defence and instruct 
Krasin (or Lomonosov) to immediately draft a decision 



322 



V. I. LENIN 



(on withdrawals from the army) and reach agreement with 
Sklyansky. 

Written in December, 
not earlier than 25, 1919 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

490 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 315 

26. XII. 1919 

Smirnov 

Revolutionary Military Council 5 
Omsk or present whereabouts 

Re your No. 4211: transfer not one hundred, but two 
hundred trains and locomotives. Rally all forces to expe- 
dite coal and relieve the railway, as well as to guard prop- 
erty against pilferage. Report fulfilment more frequently. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

491 

TELEGRAM TO T. V. SAPRONOV 

26. XII. 1919 

Sapronov* 

Gubernia Executive Committee or Gubernia Revolutionary 

Committee 

Kharkov 

Copy to Vladimirov, Chairman of the Special Food 
Commission of the Southern Front 

The transport situation is so grave here that heroic efforts 
are needed both for deliveries of coal here and even more 
for stepping up repairs to locomotives. Put the best people 
on this, check personally, introduce a bonus in grain 



* At the top of the manuscript, Lenin wrote: "top priority, by 
direct line. Inform me of the hour of delivery to addressees in Khar- 
kov. Lenin." — Ed. 



TO CENTRAL COLLEGIUM OF AGRICULTURAL CENTRES 323 



for every locomotive repaired, restore the best repair- 
shops, introduce work in two and three shifts. Telegraph 
fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



492 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

27. XII. 1919 

Comrade Chicherin, 

Your proposals have been adopted almost entirely by the 
Politbureau. 316 Regarding the exact text, phone the Secre- 
tary of the C.C., Comrade Krestinsky. 

Please, never use the expression "Chairman of the C.C.", 
for there is no such post. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



493 

TO THE CENTRAL COLLEGIUM 
OF AGITATIONAL CENTRES 

30. XII. 1919 

Central Collegium of Agitational Centres 317 

I recommend the bearer, Comrade Maria Movshovich, 
whom I have known personally for many years, as a most 
loyal Party worker, and I earnestly request that she be 
treated with complete confidence and given every assistance, 
in particular that she be allowed just now ten days' leave 
of absence to restore her health. 318 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



324 



1920 



494 

TO SOPHIA BRICHKINA 319 

Brichkina: that is not the way. It is not enough to send 
it to Tsyurupa. You must check and write down what reply 
has been sent and when. 

Written early in 
January 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



495 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 320 

Send copies 

1) to the Commissariat for Posts and Telegraphs 

2) to the Commissariat for Railways, and inform them 
by telephone that today in the Council of Defence (2/1. 
1920) we shall raise the question of military accountancy: 
let them be prepared. 

Lenin 

Written on January 2, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



TO G. V. CHICHERIN. JANUARY 4, 1920 



325 



496 

TO THE PODOLSK UYEZD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Uyezd Executive Committee 
Podolsk 

Copy to Moscow Gubernia Executive Committee 

In the village of Alexandrovo, Podolsk Uyezd, Moscow 
Gubernia, a certain Teryokhin, in the name of the Young 
Communist League, contrary to the direct instruction of 
the People's Commissariat for Education, has occupied a 
lace-making school, arrested a schoolmistress, and removed 
some of the property. Immediately vacate the school prem- 
ises, return the articles taken both from the school and 
the teachers, and make it possible for the teachers to work 
in peace. Investigate Teryokhin's illegal actions with a 
view to his prosecution, 

Report fulfilment. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

2/1. 20 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten copy 



497 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

4/1. 1920 

Comrade Chicherin, 

Please forward to Litvinov (and if possible, transmit 
in abridged form by telegraph in code): 

I have received from him a small batch of pamphlets and 
newspapers and am extremely disappointed. The selection 
has been utterly casual and careless. Obviously, no one has 
shown the slightest care in such an important matter as 
supplying Russia with Western socialist literature. 



326 



V. I. LENIN 



There are no pamphlets and books by the socialist lead- 
ers (although their titles and the names of the authors 
can be found in the Austrian, German, French, Italian and 
English newspapers). 

The newspapers have been so poorly selected that 9 /io 
of them is rubbish, while, for example, out of a heap of 
issues of Freiheit, 321 the really important issues (even the 
most important, perhaps the only important ones) have been 
left out, namely, the reports of the Leipzig Congress 322 
and the text of the resolutions. 

Absolute carelessness, negligence or lack of understand- 
ing and unwillingness to understand what is needed. 

We must have them (Litvinov and all members of the 
R.C.P. abroad and all "bureaux" and agencies) see to it 
that people conversant with the literature are engaged in each 
country (to begin with, Denmark, Holland, etc., will suf- 
fice), their duty being to collect 4-5 copies of every socialist 
and anarchist and communist pamphlet and book, every 
resolution, all reports and minutes of congresses, etc., etc., 
in all languages. All to be delivered to Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Vienna, etc. (to Berlin as well). Messengers are availa- 
ble — infrequently, but they are available. The literature 
must be collected in good time by employed persons (Rus- 
sians are slovenly and will never do this meticulously). 
It is stupid to grudge money for this. 
Ask Litvinov to tell this to 

Abramovich 

Kopp 

Rutgers 

Bronsky 

Lyubarsky 

Reich 

Strom 

Z. Hoglund 

Kilbom 

Rothstein, etc. 
Have 3-5 and more collectors, otherwise we shall never 
get what is absolutely necessary. 



Lenin 



TO A. I. SVIDERSKY. JANUARY 5, 1920 



327 



P.S. Please send a copy of this (or this letter itself after 
it has been dealt with) to Klinger. 

First published in part Printed from the original 

in 1961 in the book: 
Biblioteka V. I. Lenina 
v Kremle (Lenin's Library 
in the Kremlin) 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

498 

TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 

4. I. 1920 

Dear V. D., # 

I am paying personally for my library. 

When you are well again, please pay everything 

3,200 
+ 500 (Dahl) 

3,700, etc. 

and keep the receipts. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

I enclose 4,000 rubles. 

# 

The library of the C.P.C.'s Managing Department is 
another matter. 

First published in 1926 Printed from the original 

in the journal Ogonyok No. 13 

499 

TO A. I. SVIDERSKY 323 

Comrade Svidersky, 

Receive the comrades without fail or ask another member 
of the Board to do so, and be sure to inform me of your 
decision. 

Lenin 

5/1. 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



328 



V. I. LENIN 



500 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 324 

Members of the Politbureau 

I voted against this decision of the C.P.C., but I consid- 
er it inconvenient to rescind it at once. 

I propose, without calling together the Politbureau, to 
collect the votes of its members. My proposal: to get an 
immediate decision of the C.P.C. that the State Control 
is obliged to let the Food Commissariat know about every 
such case. In a month or so we shall see. 

Lenin 

Written in January, not earlier 
than 5 and not later than 23, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



501 

TELEGRAM TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY 
COUNCIL OF THE 3rd ARMY 325 

12. I. 1920 

R.M.C. of the 3rd Army 

I fully approve your proposals. I welcome the initiative. 
Am submitting the question to the Council of People's 
Commissars. Start on the job, on condition of the strictest 
co-ordination with the civil authorities, and devote all 
energies to the collection of all food surpluses and the res- 
toration of transport. 

Lenin 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE C.P.C. JANUARY 12, 1920 



329 



502 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 



Top priority 
By direct line 



12. I. 1920 



Smirnov 

Revolutionary Military Council 5 

1) R.M.C. 3 proposes converting the 3rd Army into 
labour army for economic revival of the Urals, Chelyabinsk 
and Tobolsk gubernias. I am in full sympathy with this 
and shall put it before the Council of People's Commissars, 
tomorrow. Please give your opinion. 

2) I am deeply concerned about the delay in delivering 
here 200 locomotives with food trains. The most urgent 
revolutionary measures must be taken to hasten this. See 
to prompt unconditional execution. 



The question raised by R.M.C. 3 is of the greatest 
importance. I am putting it before the C.P.C. on 13. I. 1920, 
and I ask the departments concerned to have their opinions 
ready by that date. 

I think that on 13.1 in the C.P.C. we should 

first, approve this in principle, 

second, give it the widest publicity for encouragement, 
third, endorse the basic principles of its organisation, or, 
if this cannot be done at once, elect a workmanlike commis- 
sion to draft these principles as a matter of urgency. 



Lenin 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



503 

TO ALL MEMBERS OF THE C.P.C. 



Lenin 



12. I. 1920 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



330 



V. I. LENIN 



504 

UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION 
ON S. I. SYRTSOV'S TELEGRAM 

Lenin, Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars 

The position in the Don as regards food organisation is impossi- 
ble. The Don food agencies have been set up on paper, but the appoint- 
ed food officials are working in the Tambov and Saratov gubernias, 
and not where they should be. The district food agencies, set up in 
amateur fashion and not connected with the Don Executive Commit- 
tee, are receiving no directives and instructions, and for that reason 
are not capable of working, and cannot counteract the army food 

agents who frequently commit outrageous excesses. 

Syrtsov 

Deputy Chairman, Don Executive Committee 

Tsyurupa and Sereda: 

Your comments? 
N.B. II Seed is badly needed for sowing!! 326 

Written in January, not earlier 
than 13 and not later than 15, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



505 

TO THE CHIEF COAL COMMITTEE 



327 



For urgent reply: 1) is this known? 

2) what exactly is known? 

3) is there literature about this coal? 

4) what has been done? 

5) what is being done? 



Lenin 



14/1. 



Written on January 14, 1920 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



TO THE CHIEF OIL COMMITTEE. JANUARY 15, 1920 



331 



506 

TO M. N. POKROVSKY 



15. I. 1920 



Deputy People's, Commissar for Education 

Please issue orders for our state libraries (the Rumyantsev 
Museum, the Petrograd Public Library, and others) imme- 
diately to begin collecting and keeping all whiteguard 
newspapers (Russian and foreign). Please give me a draft 
of the order prescribing that all military and civil authori- 
ties are to collect and hand over these newspapers to the 
state libraries. 328 



P.S. Perhaps you would find it appropriate in these 
orders (or better separately?) to order and check on the 
collection of complete sets of our newspapers since 1917. 



TO THE CHIEF OIL COMMITTEE 
OF THE SUPREME ECONOMIC COUNCIL 

I enclose a cutting from Izvestia No. 8 (855) for 14/1. 20, 
and ask to be informed whether you are aware of the facts 
stated in this paragraph, 329 and how far the figures given 
in it may be regarded as trustworthy. What practical meas- 
ures are being taken in this connection?* 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



507 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on January 15, 1920 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the typewrit- 
ten text, added to and 
signed by Lenin 



This sentence is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



332 



V. I. LENIN 



508 

TELEGRAM TO K. G. MYASKOV 

Myaskov 

Gubernia Food Commissar 
Samara 

Copy to Muss, Co-operative Department 

Copy to the Gubernia Committee of the Communist Party 

For the amount of friction and misunderstanding with 
the co-operatives, Samara holds first place. I am surprised 
that implementation of the decree of March 20 has not yet 
been arranged. I order strict adherence to the instructions 
of the People's Commissariat for Food. Report what has 
been obstructing your work, who instituted the commission 
which dismissed Chairman Mikhailov and other co-opera- 
tors and on what grounds it is operating. Instead of fighting 
individuals, to the annoyance of the co-operative move- 
ment, concentrate efforts on political preparation for the 
new elections. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on January 15, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 



509 

POSTSCRIPT TO L. D. TROTSKY'S TELEGRAM 330 

I request Comrade Frunze, in accordance with Trotsky's 
directives, to develop revolutionary energy for maximum 
acceleration of the construction of the railway and dispatch 
of oil. Confirm receipt. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on January 17, 1920 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



TELEGRAM TO KH. Y. YUMAGULOV. JANUARY 1920 



333 



510 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 

Please telephone Markov and tell him that I strongly 
support Semashko's request. 331 

Lenin 

18/1. 

Written on January 18, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



511 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 

If that is how the question is put, then dictate to your 
secretary a protest against the Narrow Council and a draft 
decree for the Full Council (that the Narrow Council 
should not interfere in local affairs without special reasons 
and is always obliged to make inquiries from local Soviets 
except in cases of extreme urgency). 332 

Written on January 20, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



512 

TELEGRAM TO H. Y. YUMAGULOV 333 

Yumagulov 
Ufa 

Copies to Eltsin, Ufa 

and to Artyom Sergeyev, Bashkir Revolutionary Commit- 
tee, Bashkir Regional Committee, Sterlitamak 

In stating in the telegram that "The All-Russia Central 
Executive Committee considers it improbable and quite out 
of the question that Artyom, Samoilov and Preobrazhensky 
could carry on agitation against the Bashkir Republic", 
the All-Russia C.E.C. thereby again confirmed the necessity 
of their most loyal observance of the Bashkir Constitution. 



334 



V. I. LENIN 



The telegram of the Central Committee sent later to Com- 
rade Artyom had the same aim. Under these circumstances 
I am quite sure that Artyom, Preobrazhensky and Samoi- 
lov will give no real cause for complications. The members 
of the Bashkir Revolutionary Committee should act in the 
same way. Only from your telegram did I learn that Com- 
rades Shamigulov, Izmailov and others were deported from 
Bashkiria by the Bashkir Revolutionary Committee; the 
Central Committee thought they were travelling to Moscow 
on their own initiative to make a report, considered it 
unnecessary for the five comrades to waste time on the 
journey and sent them back to Sterlitamak. 

Your attempt to deport old Party comrades from Bash- 
kiria, the absurd reference to their Bukharinist orientation, 
the persistent, though incorrect, application of the epithet 
"Ukrainians" to Preobrazhensky, Artyom and Samoilov — 
give me grounds for doubting your objectivity in this 
matter. Therefore I order you immediately to fulfil the 
telegram from the All-Russia C.E.C. of 20.1, which is 
still unfulfilled as regards cancellation of the conspiracy 
report. 

On behalf of the Politbureau of the C.C., 

Lenin* 

Written in January, 
after 20, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the text 

in the book: Obrazovaniye in Krestinsky's hand- 

Bashkirskoi ASSR writing and signed 

(The Formation of the Bashkir by Lenin 

Autonomous Soviet Socialist 
Republic), Ufa 

513 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE 5th ARMY 

R.M.C. 5 

I approve your proposal in regard to a buffer state. 334 
Only it is essential to lay down firmly that our represent- 



* The words "On behalf of the Politbureau of the C.C., Lenin 
are in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



TO N. N. KRESTINSKY. JANUARY 1920 



335 



ative, or preferably two representatives, at the Political 
Centre should be informed of all decisions and have the 
right to attend all conferences of the Political Centre. 

Second — serious measures of control should be taken over 
the disarming of the Czechoslovaks. 335 

Third — it will be very difficult for us for transport rea- 
sons to move the Czechoslovaks out. 



January 21, 1920 

First published in part in 
1958 in the book: V. T. Agalakov, 
Iz istorii stroitelstva Sovetskoi 
vlasti v Vostochnoi Sibiri. 
1919-1921 (From the History 
of the building of Soviet Power 
in Eastern Siberia, 1919-1921) 

Published in full in 1960 in the 
book: Irkutskaya partiinaya organi- 
zatsiya v vosstanovitelny period 
(1920-1926) (The Irkutsk Party 
Organisation of the Restoration 
Period (1920-1926) 



Lenin* 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



514 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

Larin is to be forbidden project-mongering. Rykov to 
be warned: curb Larin, otherwise you will get it hot. 336 

Written in January, not later 
than 23, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



* The telegram was signed also by L. D. Trotsky, Chairman 
of the Revolutionary Military Council. — Ed. 



336 



V. I. LENIN 



515 



TELEGRAM 



TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE 1st LABOUR ARMY 

Revolutionary Council of Labour Army 1, copy to Yermakov, 
Uposkom* Ekaterinburg 

In reply to Yermakov's telegram No. 25 concerning the 
existence of a huge number of all kinds of commissions, 
organisations and authorised agents engaged in organising 
fuel procurement — of military commissions alone there are 
as many as twelve plus the Ekaterinburg military district 
commission, the Ufa front-line commission, etc., newly set 
up by order of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 
Republic — the Council of Defence decided: to instruct the 
Revolutionary Council of the Labour Army to settle the 
questions raised in the telegram in a way which will restore 
the greatest possible unity and co-ordination in the work 
of cutting, sawing, transporting and floating firewood, with 
the gubleskom and zheleskom** retaining the leading 
role. 337 

Report decisions and measures adopted.*** 



* Authorised agent of the Special Committee of the Council of 
Defence for introducing martial law on the railways and promoting 
fuel supplies. — Ed. 

** Gubleskom and zheleskom— Gubernia Timber Committee and 
Railway Timber Committee. — Ed. 

***The last sentence is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



Written in January 23, 1920 

First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from 
the typewritten text, 
added to and signed 
by Lenin 



TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH. JANUARY 1920 



337 



516 

TO THE RUSSIAN TELEGRAPH AGENCY 338 

Forward it to ROSTA: 

1) for information and guidance; 

2) investigate who issued the "Zatonsky" idiocy, and im- 
pose a measure of punishment on this person; 

3) report to me fulfilment, and 

4) the measures taken to prevent such "unfortunate" 
occurrences in future. 

Lenin 

27/1. 

Written in January 27, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

517 

TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH* 

Comrade V. D. Bonch-Bruyevich, 

The State Publishers may be offended that I did 
not and Krzhizhanovsky's pamphlet through them? 339 Per- 
haps I broke the rules? I was in a great hurry. 

If it is inconvenient for you to settle the matter other- 
wise, would you send this note of mine to Comrade Vorovsky 
(I ask him to have a paper issued by the State Publishers 
ordering the speediest, by Sunday l.II, publication of 
Krzhizhanovsky's pamphlet at the 17th Print-shop, for- 
merly Kushnerev's, and I apologise for having sent the 
pamphlet direct to the press because I was in a great hurry). 

Perhaps this has already been done? If not, it must be 
done. Give me your reply. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written at the end of January 1920 

First published in 1930 in the book: Printed from the original 

Vladimir Bonch-Bruyevich, 
Na boyevykh postakh Fevralskoi i 
Oktyabrskoi revolyutsii, 
Moscow 



* On the envelope Lenin wrote: "V. D. Bonch-Bruyevich. ((If 
at home wait for an answer.)) (from Lenin) (to be signed for)."— Ed. 



338 



V. I. LENIN 



518 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD 
GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Gubernia E.C. 
Nizhni-Novgorod 

Copy to the Assistant Manager of the Radio Laboratory 

In view of the special importance of the tasks confront- 
ing the Radio Laboratory and the important successes it 
has achieved, give it the most effective assistance and support 
in facilitating conditions of work and removing obstacles. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on February 5, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 

519 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD 

CHEKA 

Chairman of the Cheka 
Nizhni-Novgorod 

Copy to the Assistant Manager of the Radio Laboratory 
Copy to Dzerzhinsky, Vecheka, Moscow 

In view of the urgent and particularly important work 
of the Radio Laboratory, release Shorin immediately on a 
surety from its collegium and committee, without discon- 
tinuing the investigation into Shorin's case. 340 

Lenin* 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on February 5, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV the typewritten text, 

added to and signed 
by Lenin 

* The words "Copy to Dzerzhinsky, Vecheka, Moscow", "release 
... immediately", "without discontinuing the investigation into Sho- 
rin's case", and the signature, are in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



TO THE R.M.C. OF THE LABOUR ARMY. FEBRUARY 19, 1920 339 



520 

TELEGRAM TO S. T. KOVYLKIN 

By direct line 
7. II. 1920 

Kovylkin 
Saratov 

Your resignation unacceptable. You must learn to work 
together with Arzhanov at all costs. This is possible if 
you won't be obstinate. Report the slightest friction to me. 
Arzhanov is appointed temporarily. 341 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



521 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE LABOUR ARMY 

10. II. 1920 

R.M.C. of the Labour Army 
Ekaterinburg 

I am putting your inquiries before the Council of Defence. 
Trotsky has left to join you. Personally I fear that you are 
indulging in project-mongering, and that Bumazhny's and 
Maximov's opposition is a play at departmental game. 
I advise you not to engage in recriminations but to throw 
all forces into the main thing, viz.: 1) the restoration of 
railway transport, 2) the collection and delivery of food, 
3) the delivery of firewood, timber and barges to landing- 
stages. Let me know whether you can carry out this work 
harmoniously, energetically and rapidly. 342 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



340 



V. I. LENIN 



522 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

To be handed to the duty commissar for immediate, 
priority transmission 
Notify Kremlin, Moscow, of delivery 

Stalin 

Ukrainian Revolutionary Committee 
Kharkov 

I am still hopeful that after your talks with Tukhachevsky 
and the removal of Sokolnikov, things will adjust them- 
selves without your transference. Therefore, for the time be- 
ing, we are not notifying Smilga. Be sure to inform me in good 
time and in detail by code or by telephone from Kharkov. 
I consider it most important that the troops disengaged 
after the capture of Odessa should not be kept on the Dnie- 
ster, but moved to the Western Front as a safeguard against 
the Poles. Let me know your opinion. 

Lenin 

Written on February 10, 1920 

First published in part in 1929 Printed from 

in the book: K. Y. Voroshilov, the decoded text 

Stalin i Krasnaya Armia (Stalin of the telegraph tape 

and the Red Army), 
Moscow-Leningrad 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



523 

TO S. P. SEREDA AND A. D. TSYURUPA 

14. II. 1920 

Comrades Sereda 

and Tsyurupa 

Copies to the All-Russia Central Council of Trade Unions 
Commissariat for State Control 
Commissariat for Trade 
Supreme Economic Council 

I draw special attention to the very sensible article 
"Lose No Time" by Y. Preobrazhensky in Pravda of 11.11. 



TO I. T. SMILGA AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. FEBRUARY 17, 1920 341 



It is essential to adopt his proposal 343 and immediately 

1) draft a decree 

a) on the obligatory organisation of urban farming 
(in all towns); 

b) on measures of stimulation and development; 

c) assignments (as detailed as possible) to be given 
in this field for the year 1920, etc.; 

2) step up purchases of seed in Denmark and abroad 
in general; 

3) step up agitation and workers' control over the meas- 
ures in §1. 

Please send me a brief summary of what is already being 
done (if possible one that would be suitable also for the 
press — we shall publish it in Ekonomicheskaya Zhizn, if it 
is not possible to do so in Pravda or Izvestia). 

In this connection, it is necessary to begin an intensified 
and more systematic struggle against suburban bag-trading 
by drawing urban workers into the business of keeping 
an account (detailed) of crops, stocks, surpluses, collection 
of food products in suburban districts, and helping their 
procurement by the Food Commissariat agencies. I request 
the Food Commissariat to let me know what measures 
are being taken. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

524 

TELEGRAM 
TO I. T. SMILGA AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

All in code 

Smilga and Orjonikidze 

Am deeply concerned about the state of our troops on 
the Caucasian Front, the complete demoralisation among 
Budyonny's forces, the weakening of all our troops, the weak- 
ness of the general command, the discord between the armies, 
the strengthening of the enemy. 344 It is essential to exert 



342 



V. I. LENIN 



all efforts and put through a number of emergency meas- 
ures with revolutionary energy. Telegraph fully in code 
what exactly you are undertaking. 

Lenin 

Written on February 17, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



525 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

In code 

Trotsky 

Copy to Smirnov, R.M.C. 5 
also in code 

I fully support your reply to Smirnov. We must vehe- 
mently denounce the opponents of a buffer state 345 (it 
seems that Frumkin is such an opponent), threaten to bring 
them before a Party court, and demand that everyone in 
Siberia carry out the slogan: "not a step farther east, all- 
out efforts to hasten the movement of troops and locomo- 
tives to the west, to Russia". We would be idiots to allow 
ourselves to be drawn into a stupid movement into the 
heart of Siberia, permitting Denikin meanwhile to revive 
and the Poles to strike. It would be a crime. 

Lenin 

Written on February 19, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



526 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU, C.C., 

R.C.P.(B.) 346 

Krestinsky and L. B. Kamenev 

To the members of the Politbureau: 

I am against summoning Stalin. He is cavilling. The 
Commander-in-Chief is quite right: first of all we must 
defeat Denikin, then pass to a state of peace. 



TELEGRAM TO D. Z. MANUILSKY. FEBRUARY 22, 1920 



343 



I suggest replying to Stalin: "The Politbureau cannot 
summon you at present, as it considers that the most im- 
portant and urgent task is to achieve final victory over 
Denikin, for which you must step up reinforcements to the 
Caucasian Front with the utmost energy." 

Lenin 

Written on February 19, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



527 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN* 

Stepping up the movement of reinforcements from the 
South-Western Front to the Caucasian Front is your con- 
cern. It is necessary in general to help in every way and 
not wrangle about departmental competences. 347 

Lenin 

Written on February 19, 1920 Printed from the original 



528 

TELEGRAM TO D. Z. MANUILSKY 

Manuilsky 

Headquarters of the South-Western Front 
Kharkov 

Sapronov is wrong, because before focussing on the mid- 
dle peasant it is necessary first, before that, to organise 
the poor peasants. This must definitely be done, and best 
done not in the form of Poor Peasants' Committees, but 
in the form of Soviets composed exclusively of poor and 
middle peasants, with special measures on our part for 
safeguarding the interests of the poor peasants and for 
collection of grain. I asked you about transport since 
the chief task now is to step up the transport of troops 



Transmitted in code by direct line. — Ed. 



344 



V. I. LENIN 



and complete the defeat of Denikin. We must mobilise the- 
workers for this and at all costs bring up large forces quick- 
ly and win back Rostov. I ask Stalin to reply to me wheth- 
er he is taking all measures. 

Lenin 

Written on February 22, 1920 

First published in 1957 Printed from the text 

in the book: V. I. Lenin, of the telegraph form 

Ob Ukraine (On the Ukraine), 
Kiev 



529 

TELEGRAM TO KH. G. RAKOVSKY 

23. II. 1920 

Rakovsky, Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

of the Ukraine 

Kharkov 

The decision of the III International* will be finally 
edited tomorrow evening and sent to you on Wednesday. 
I have just spoken with Tsyurupa about the three-dessiatine 
norm, but so far we have failed to convince each other. 
Tomorrow I hope we shall arrive at a decision. 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



530 

INSTRUCTION ON ZALYGIN'S TELEGRAM 

Urgent 

Comrade Lenin, Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars 
Moscow 

Simakov, Chairman of the Bolkhov Uyezd Party Committee, was 
married in church to the daughter of a capitalist hostage. At a gener- 



* This evidently refers to the resolution of the Comintern Execu- 
tive Committee on the Borotbists (see Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 40, p. 159).— Ed. 



TO SAMARA AND SARATOV GUBERNIA PARTY COMMITTEES 345 



al meeting of the Communists of the Bolkhov organisation I pro- 
posed that for undermining Party principles Chairman Simakov should 
be expelled from the Party. The proposal was adopted and Simakov 
was expelled from the Party. Some members of the Party Committee 
adhered to their own opinion and called in Comrade Pakun, represent- 
ative of the Orel Gubernia Committee. The decision of the meeting 
was annulled. For putting forward my proposal I was arrested a few 
days later and am now in prison. I ask for your assistance. 

Zalygin 

Head of the Uyezd Department 
of Education 

The arrested man to be released at once. An explanation 
giving reasons for the arrest to be sent by telegraph and 
all the case papers to be mailed to the Central Committee. 

Written in February, 
not earlier than 24, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



531 

TELEGRAM TO THE SAMARA AND SARATOV 
GUBERNIA PARTY COMMITTEES 
AND GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES 

Gubernia Committee of the R.C.P. 
Gubernia Executive Committee 

Avksentyevsky, Deputy Commander of the Turkestan Front 
Samara 

Gubernia Committee of the R.C.P. 
Gubernia Executive Committee 
Budassi, builder of the Emba railway 
Saratov 

Construction of the railway and oil pipeline to the Emba 
is of the greatest importance. It is necessary to assist it 
with the utmost energy and expedite the work in every 
way. Organise agitation, set up a permanent promotion 
commission, introduce labour conscription; everything by 



346 



V. I. LENIN 



agreement with Budassi, who is building the railway. 
Telegraph fulfilment regularly. 348 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on February 25, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

532 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 
OF THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD 

25. II. 1920 

The Ukhtomsky (Lyubertsy) Works of Moscow Gubernia, 
Moscow Uyezd, an agricultural machinery plant, has coal 
and materials and the workers (1,300 employees) have not 
dispersed. It would be particularly important to support 
such a factory. 

Please discuss urgently whether the workers of this fac- 
tory can be given food assistance as a special measure. 

Please telephone your reply to me. 349 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



TO V. N. LOBOVA, A. Y. MINKIN, 
Y. M. YAROSLAVSKY 350 

26. II. 1920 

Comrades Lobova 
Minkin 
Y. Yaroslavsky 

and if they are not in Perm, then to other mem- 
bers of the Perm Gubernia Committee of the R.C.P. 
The bearers, Comrades 

Fyodor Samsonovich Sannikov, 
Grigory Ivanovich Mikhalev, 
Platon Pavlovich Moskalyov, 
came to me from Kalinin. 



TELEGRAM TO F. F. RASKOLNIKOV. FEBRUARY 27, 1920 347 



They are non-Party people, but create an impression of 
remarkable conscientiousness. 

They are requesting re-registration and checking of the 
members of the Uyezd Party Committee (they are from 
Perm Gubernia, Usolye Uyezd, Polovodovo Volost) on the 
plea that there are many of the worst elements in the local 
Party. 

Will you please fulfil their request. 

Let me know the results of the check-up. 

Give me the names of those members of the Uyezd Party 
Committee (in Usolye and in the volosts of Usolye Uyezd) 
who are personally known to you and are absolutely re- 
liable. 

With communist greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

Sent to Perm 

First published (in facsimile) Printed from the original 

on November 24, 1929, 
in Pravda No. 274 



534 

TELEGRAM TO F. F. RASKOLNIKOV 

27. II. 1920 

Fleet Commander Raskolnikov 
Astrakhan 

Copy to Kirov, R.M.C. 11 

Copy to the Astrakhan Gubernia Committee of the R.C.P. 

Every effort must be made, without losing a single hour, 
and taking the maximum precautions, to transport all the 
oil from Guriev at first open water. Reply immediately 
whether all measures have been taken, how prepared you 
are, what are the prospects, whether the best people have 
been appointed, and who is responsible for ensuring safe 
transport by sea. 

Lenin 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



348 



V. I. LENIN 



535 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 
OF THE FOOD COMMISSARIAT 

27. II. 1920 

Comrade Vinogradov, Chairman of the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Vesyegonsk Teachers' Union, has presented the 
attached petition. 351 

The crux of the matter is that the Vesyegonsk Uyezd 
Food Committee be instructed to issue to the teachers (about 
500 in the uyezd) an increased ration of bread and potatoes 
plus footwear or leather. 

Both from local stocks — the uyezd has surpluses. 

Please make the necessary inquiries today (the comrade 
has to leave tomorrow) and give me a reply by telephone 
(in the evening we shall decide the matter in the Council 
of Defence). 

Lenin 

First published in 1924 Printed from the original 

in the book: A. Vinogradov, 
Iz vospominanii o V. I. Lenine 
(From Recollections 
of V. I. Lenin), Vesyegonsk 



536 

TO K. A. ALFEROV 

Comrade Alferov, 

Lomonosov, before his departure, had told me 
everything had been done for the oil pipeline. 

Clearly we have here sabotage or slovenliness, for 
information is utterly confusing. 

Send me without fail not later than 11 a.m. next Tuesday 
1) a short, extremely brief, report on (a) what has been 
ordered and (b) what has been done. 

2) The name, patronymic and surname of each respon- 
sible person. 

Lenin 

27.11 



TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. FEBRUARY 28, 1920 



349 



(P.S. In reply to your note of 27.II.) 352 

Written on February 27, 1920 

First published on April 22, Printed from the original 

1926, in Pravda No. 92 collated with the type- 

written text, signed and 
added to by Lenin 



537 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

28. II 1920 

Zinoviev 
Petrograd 

Pokrovsky tells me that the library of the former Free 
Economic Society 353 is being pilfered and books are even 
being burned. I emphatically request you to verify this, 
put a stop to the scandal, and let me have the name of 
the responsible local inspector. Have him send me without 
delay an official telegram re fulfilment. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



538 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Stalin, member of the Revolutionary Military Council of 
the South-Western Front 

The Central Committee confirms its decision on the need 
to assign responsible political workers from the armies of 
the South-Western Front for transport work. The C.C. 
considers the transfer of responsible workers from the ar- 
mies to the railways to be the most important guarantee 
for the salvation of transport. Even the Caucasian Front 



350 



V. I. LENIN 



has provided the whole apparatus of the 2nd Army and 100 
political workers for work on the railways of the South- 
East. Telegraph the number and duties of those assigned. 

Lenin 

Written on February 28, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV of the telegraph form 

signed by Lenin 



539 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 354 

I think you should "wear them out" with practical as- 
signments: 

Dan — sanitary inspection, 

Martov — control over dining-rooms. 

Written at the end of February- 
beginning of March 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



540 

TO L. B. KRASIN 

Would it be too much bother to order for me a similar 
map as of 1.III.1920 

showing 

railways under construction 
+ (oc) track laid 

((3) other stages of commencement 
(or progress) of construction. 

Written in 1920, 
not earlier than March 1 

First published in part Printed from the original 

on April 18, 1963, 
in Izvestia No. 93 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO I. T. SMILGA AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. MARCH 2, 1920 351 



541 

FOR LANSBURY 

In a conversation with Comrade Lansbury I promised to 
write about our attitude to religion. 355 Comrade Krasikov 
has done this much better than I could have done, the more 
so since Comrade Krasikov is specially in charge of these 
affairs. 

Lenin 

2/III 

Written on March 2, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



542 

TELEGRAM 
TO I. T. SMILGA AND G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

In code 
3. III. 1920 

Smilga and Orjonikidze 
R.M.C., Caucasian Front 

It is extremely important for you to work harmoniously 
with Ksandrov, who has been sent to the Donets Basin 
with special powers. Regarding coal, telegraph how matters 
stand. Is the rumour about Peters having been killed by 
the Denikinites in Rostov true? What in general is the 
military situation? 

Lenin 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



352 



V. I. LENIN 



543 

TELEGRAM TO N. N. KUZMIN 

In code 
By direct line 

Comrade Kuzmin, member of R.M.C. 6 
Re No. 95. 

Exercise the utmost caution and distrust in this mat- 
ter. 356 Mind you are not fooled by officers who want to 
infiltrate among us in order to demoralise the army. Make 
thorough inquiries about everyone wishing to return and if 
you are convinced that his return will be useful, inform 
Moscow to obtain permission. Discuss this question with 
Lomov's commission, 357 which has gone to Archangel. 
Report the views expressed in the discussion. 

Re No. 82. 

Chicherin's statement about leaving the country stipu- 
lated the surrender of the White government, but it 
has fled. For the time being, do not permit anyone 
to go abroad. Employ the arrested officers on work. Use 
those who have remained at liberty for the same purpose. 
Sklyansky's telegram No. 49/m about sending some of them 
to the centre holds good. Discuss the question with Lo- 
mov's commission. 

Lenin 

Written on March 5, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV Sklyansky's handwriting 

544 

TO S. Y. CHUTSKAYEV 

5/III. 

Comrade Chutskayev, 

Especially urgent measures must be adopted to speed up 
the sorting of valuables. 358 If we are too late, they will 
give nothing for them in Europe and America. 

In Moscow, a thousand Party members, etc., can (and 
should) be mobilised for this work under special control. 



TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY. MARCH 7, 1920 



353 



At your end, evidently, the whole business is dragging 
woefully. 

Write what extraordinary measures you are taking to 
speed things up. 

Lenin 

Written on March 5, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

545 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 359 

In code* 

Trotsky 

If grain and timber procurement has risen, special efforts 
must be devoted to barges and preparations for floating, 
especially barges for oil, then to building houses for the 
Chelyabinsk and other coal workers. Cannot the Siberian 
prisoners of war and officers be moved to the Urals and 
set to work on coal and timber? 

To expedite replies from the centre, obtain direct lines 
through the military department. 

Krestinsky has replied to you. I repeat in brief. The 
Ishim remains in Tyumen Gubernia. You can keep Brunov- 
sky. About meat, an order to organise salting centres has 
been given. 

Regarding regional centres, it is necessary to tread war- 
ily and think it over carefully, so as to avoid regionalism. 

If troop formation in Siberia has been overdone you 
should check yourself what real measures are being taken 
to combat this, summoning to the direct line anyone you 
require. 

Smirnov must be taken off diplomatic, frontier and 
military affairs and returned to peace-time work. 

Lenin 

Written on March 7, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Transmitted by direct line. — Ed. 



354 



V. I. LENIN 



546 

TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Via the military 
by army line 
In C.C. code 

Trotsky 

The Poles are advancing further, we have evacuated 
Rechitsa. Gomel is said to be threatened, therefore, despite 
Stalin's optimism, I consider essential and urgently neces- 
sary all the extraordinary measures you have proposed. 
In regard to the Commissariat for Railways, the Polit- 
bureau has decided to propose making you People's Com- 
missar for Railways, since Krasin will be going abroad 
in a week, and Lomonosov, after typhus, will have recov- 
ered only in six weeks' time. 360 Reply immediately. 

Lenin 

Written in March, not earlier than 
8 and not later than 20, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



547 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 361 

No terms whatever with Socialist-Revolutionaries and 
Mensheviks: either they submit to us unconditionally or 
they will be arrested.* 

Written on March 9, 1920 

First published in 1938 Printed from the original 

in Bolshevik No. 2 



* In the typewritten copy of the telegram this is followed by the 
words: "On behalf of the Politbureau, Lenin." — Ed. 



INSTRUCTION TO PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIATS. MARCH 10, 1920 355 



548 

TELEGRAM TO A. LOMOV 

9. III. 1920 

Lomov, member of the Board, Supreme Economic 

Council 

Archangel 

Try to search out, or get someone to search out, press 
materials and reports about the oil-bearing district of the 
river Ukhta in the museum of the Society for the Study of 
the Northern Territory and in the Management Board of 
State Properties. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



549 

INSTRUCTION TO PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIATS 362 

10. III. 1920 

In view of the catastrophically serious food position of 
the workers of Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia, please or- 
ganise for today a meeting of representatives of the 

Food Commissariat 

Commissariat for Agriculture 

Commissariat for Railways 

Chief Board of Water Transport 

Central Committee of Textile Industry 

Commissariat for Labour. 

Comrade Kiselyov, member of the Presidium of the 
C.E.C., has agreed to convene the commission. 

The commission's terms of reference: to discuss the pro- 
posals of the Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia Party Committee 
dated 6/III and to work out emergency relief measures. 
Report on fulfilment to be given to the C.P.C. by Saturday. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



Printed from the original 



356 



V. I. LENIN 



550 

TO THE POLITICAL BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 363 

To the Politbureau (or Orgbureau): this incident should 
be seized at to make a thoroughgoing investigation, enlisting 
Dzerzhinsky's assistance, find the "sister" the Menshevik 
writes about, and purge Karakhan's office. 

Lenin 

ll/III. 

Written on March 11, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



551 

TELEGRAM TO I. S. UNSCHLICHT* 



In code 
11. III. 1920 

Unschlicht 

R.M.C., Western Front 

Evidently the Poles will fight. We are doing everything 
possible to strengthen defence. Agitation in the Polish 
language must also be intensified to the utmost. We shall 
help you, if necessary, with people, money, and paper. 



Lenin 



First published (in facsimile) Printed from the original 

in 1930 in the book 
Grazhdanskaya voina. 1918- 1921 , 
Vol. Ill 



* Transmitted by direct line.— Ed. 



TO PRESIDIUM ALL-UKRAINE CONFERENCE. MARCH 16, 1920 357 



552 

TELEGRAM 
TO F. F. RASKOLNIKOV AND S. M. KIROV* 

In code 

14. III. 1920 

Raskolnikov and Kirov 
Fleet Command 
Astrakhan 

Your plans are based on deep water shipment, but Bab- 
kin proposes that the oil be transported by way of Belin- 
skaya Bank, in shallow water off shore, so that the enemy 
fleet can neither capture nor sink it. With a draught of 
from 4 to 5 quarters he names as suitable the steamships 
Jambai, Ukno, Ratmir, Lev, Neva, Lyubimy, Kirghiz, 
Alexander, and the barges Pluto, Apollo, Medusa, Rusalka, 
Valeria, Stephania and others. Pumping over at Belinskaya 
Bank. He believes that in this way it is possible to trans- 
port 320,000 in one trip and 1,600,000 a month. Report your 
opinion. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

553 

TELEGRAM 
TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE ALL-UKRAINE 
CONFERENCE OF BOROTBISTS 364 

16. III. 1920 

Rakovsky, Ukrainian Council of People's Commissars, 
for Blakitny, Presidium of the All-Ukraine Conference 
of Borotbists 
Kharkov 

I thank you for the greetings from the bottom of my heart. 
Warmest wishes for the success of the conference, partic- 
ularly for the success of the work that has been begun for 
merging with the Party of Bolsheviks. 

Lenin 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

* At the top of the manuscript Lenin wrote: "After coding re- 
turn to me. Lenin." — Ed. 



358 



V. I. LENIN 



554 

TO L. B. KRASIN 365 

Why should you not submit a separate decree for calling 
in experts (electricians) from abroad and allocating 500,000 
rubles for this purpose? It would be effective (and polit- 
ically useful). 

Written on March 16, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

555 

TO L. B. KRASIN 366 

You are making a mistake in "going out" for "something 
big" and overlooking the small. Go after the little bird. 
There are small firms outside the trusts. These firms can 
make (sometimes sell) spare parts and the like. 

Written in March, 
after 16, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

556 

TO AN UNIDENTIFIED ADDRESSEE 

There is something we failed to do as regards locomotive 
repairs. 

What about a commission of Central Committee men to 
hustle things and check up? 
Or reports once a week? 
Or something else? 

Who is keeping an eye on this? Who is pushing things? 
No one. 

Who has selected the best repair-shops? What results 
are there from the 200-pood bonus per locomotive? 

What about putting Rozengolts personally in charge of 
this, perhaps plus someone else? 

We've passed a decree and gone to sleep.... 367 

Written after March 16, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG. MARCH 20, 1920 



359 



557 

TELEGRAM TO MAXIM GORKY 368 

Gorky 
Petrograd 

In reply to your letter of 5/III, I quote the text of the 
telegram which the People's Commissariat for Food sent 
to Badayev: "Pending final settlement by a special com- 
mission of the Council of People's Commissars of the ques- 
tion of improving the position of scientists, you are instruct- 
ed to continue supplies according to the plan previously 
adopted by you, i.e., without making a reduction in keep- 
ing with recent orders of the People's Commissariat for 
Food." Pokrovsky's commission is appealing against the 
Petrograd list as being unfair. Sapozhnikov was released 
on 9/III. Manukhin has to present to Semashko, People's 
Commissar for Health, a description of the method of the 
proposed research, on the results of the examination of 
which the decision depends. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on March 19, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV Fotieva's handwriting 

signed by Lenin 



558 

TELEGRAM TO B. I. GOLDBERG 

Comrade Goldberg 

Revolutionary Military Council of the Reserve Army 

The Council of Workers' and Peasants' Defence sends 
comradely thanks on behalf of Soviet power to all the 
workers, Red Army men, technical and administrative per- 
sonnel, who worked to restore the bridge over the Kama at 
Sarapul, finishing it one month ahead of the scheduled time, 
thereby giving fresh proof of what the proletariat can 
achieve by organisation, energy and labour discipline, given 
a class-conscious attitude, so essential at the present time, 



360 



V. I. LENIN 



towards the common tasks confronting the Russian Soviet 
Republic in its efforts to cope with the economic disloca- 
tion. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on March 20, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 

559 

TO KARL RADEK 369 

Comrade Radek, 

Your opinion? Return this with a line or two. Do you 
know exactly the position of K. Liebknecht's family? Is 
assistance needed and to what extent? 

Lenin 

Written in March 
not earlier than 23, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

560 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO J. V. STALIN 

Comrade Stalin 

Copy to Comrade Rakovsky 

In view of the fact that 13 delegates from each trend 
were elected at the congress., that 105 delegates took no 
part in the elections to the Central Committee and 8 
abstained, the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P. has re- 
solved, as a way out of the abnormal situation, to set up 
a temporary bureau of two representatives each from the 
old C.C. and the new. Comrade Shumsky, a former Borot- 
bist, to be appointed the fifth member of the bureau. 370 

On behalf of the Politbureau, 

Lenin 

Written on March 24, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the handwritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO THE ALL-RUSSIA C.E.C. MARCH 24, 1920 



361 



561 

TELEGRAM TO A. Y. SHUMSKY 

In code 

Shumsky 
Kharkov 

Copy to the new Central Committee of the C.P.U. 
Copy to Rakovsky 

In confirmation of the telephone message which Lenin 
sent to Rakovsky last night, we inform you that, in view 
of the anomalous situation created by the fact that 105 
delegates refused (while 8 abstained) to take part in the 
elections to the C.C. and protested against these elec- 
tions as being unlawful, the Politbureau of the C.C, R.C.P. 
has resolved to set up a temporary body pending the set- 
tlement of this conflict. This temporary Central Committee 
should include Shumsky, a former Borotbist, now a Party 
member, who took no part in the factional struggle at the 
Ukrainian conference, along with 2 members of the new 
C.C. and 2 members of the old. 



On behalf of the Politbureau, 

Lenin 

Written on March 24, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



562 

TO THE ALL-RUSSIA CENTRAL EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 371 

24. III. 1920 

The Council of People's Commissars submits to the All- 
Russia C.E.C. for endorsement a list of enterprises to come 
under the direct control of the central bodies of the Supreme 
Economic Council and included in "Group I" in accord- 
ance with the instructions of the All-Russia C.E.C. 



362 



V. I. LENIN 



This list has been unanimously accepted by the commis- 
sion set up by the C.P.C. and endorsed by the Council of 
People's Commissars. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

563 

NOTE TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) WITH THE DRAFT 
OF A TELEGRAM TO SH. Z. ELIAVA 
AND J. E. RUDZUTAK 372 

To the Members of the Politbureau: 

I propose sending a code telegram to Eliava and Rud- 
zutak: 

"We insist on the strictest fulfilment of the C.C. deci- 
sions on foreign policy. Remove Heller and Broido from 
office immediately and completely. Hand over all affairs 
to Golub, Mashitsky and Gopner alone. Fulfil immedia- 
tely all the other directives of the C.C. and report precise 
fulfilment. We warn you that further procrastination or 
evasion on your part from subordination to the Central 
Committee of the Party will entail penalties." 

Lenin 

Written on March 24, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

564 

TO A. I. SVIDERSKY 

Comrade Svidersky, 

The following desperate position of factories has been 
brought to my notice: 

Works Management No. 6 of Kaluga Gubernia, the Troitsk-Kon- 
drovo and Polotnyany factories, formerly V. Howard and Goncharov 
Co. 



TO A. I. RYKOV. MARCH 28, 1920 



363 



Howardovo station, Syzran- Vyazma railway, and Polotnyany 
Zavod station. 

Workers approximately . . . 2,500-3,000 

Office workers 200 persons 

Mouths 12,000 

On February 28 this year militarised. 

In December assigned Red Army rations. They are receiving 
nothing.* 



Please think of some kind of special instruction for food 
to be issued to them and send me your reply. 

Lenin 

Written in March, 
not earlier than 24, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



565 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 373 

Orgbureau of the C.C. 

In my opinion, until railway transport is fully restored, 
this is out of the question. 

Lenin 

Written on March 26, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



566 

TO A. I. RYKOV 

Comrade Rykov 

The seizure of 15 million poods of petrol in Grozny 374 
compels us to adopt a number of urgent and important 
measures, such as: 



* Underlined by Lenin. — Ed. 



364 



V. I. LENIN 



1. Especially strict safeguarding of petrol. 

Military measures. Special responsibility of army men. 

2. Calculation: how much we need (maximum). 
The remainder — abroad for locomotives. 

3. Collection of lorries (from everywhere, particularly 
from the army) and their repair for transporting grain 
to the railway stations. 

4. Mobilisation of lorries and drivers for this purpose. 

5. Transport of petrol to central depots. 

Perhaps you will call a conference (of people from the 
Commissariat for Food and the military department) on this 
question and submit a proposal from the conference to the 
Council of Defence? 

Please do this urgently. 

Lenin 

28/111. 

Written on March 28, 1920 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 

567 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

Comrade Krestinsky, 
It is necessary to keep to the law. 

By law the final decision is the decision of the Orgbu- 
reau, which has already rejected the protest of the Ukrain- 
ian Central Committee. 

This decision of the Orgbureau Yakovlev (and the Uk- 
rainian C.C.) is obliged to fulfil at once. 375 

I agree to an opinion poll without recognising the right 
of the poll to hold up the decision, for only the plenum 
has that right, and I demand the right of agitation. 

Lenin 

Written not later than March 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO A. D. TSYURUPA. NOT LATTER THAN MARCH 1920 365 



568 

TO YELENA STASOVA 

Chicherin is ill. He is not looked after. He refuses treat- 
ment and is killing himself. 

A friendly letter (so as not to hurt his feelings) should 
be sent to him in the name of the Central Committee with 
the latter's decision that the C.C. demands that state prop- 
erty should not be squandered, that the best doctor should 
be called in (through Karakhan, say) and should be obeyed, 
and that, if the doctor advises, he must go on leave and 
spend the necessary time in a sanatorium. 

Lenin 

Written in 1920, 
not later than March 

First published in 1933 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXIV 



569 

TO A. D. TSYURUPA 

Comrade Tsyurupa, 

It was stated in the Politbureau that army transports 
from Siberia should be replaced by food transports (in view 
of the victories in the south). 

The decision was not put ill writing because Trotsky, 
who was in full agreement, had already issued orders. 

The member of the Supreme Council for Transport from 
the Commissariat for Food should keep his eyes open. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written in 1920, 
not later than March 



First published in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



Printed from the original 



366 



V. I. LENIN 



570 

TO A. V. LUNACHARSKY 

A number of monasteries outside Petrograd should be 
taken over to accommodate defective and homeless children 
and adolescents. 

Lenin 

Written in March 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

571 

TO I. I. KHODOROVSKY 

In Kazan (working at the University, lecturer or pro- 
fessor, etc.) there is 

Adoratsky . 

I have known him for more than 10 years. A most re- 
liable man. A well-educated Marxist. 

I have asked him to write an outline of the history of 
the revolution. 

Please 

1) make full use of him for lectures, etc. 

2) assist him with rations (increased), both him and his 
family, and with firewood, etc. 

3) wire me his address (and what has been done for him). 

Lenin 

6/IV. 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

572 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE SAMARA GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

6. IV. 1920 

Gubernia Executive Committee 
Samara 

Copy to the Revolutionary Military Council 

Are you carrying out a sufficiently drastic clean-up of 



TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. APRIL 15, 1920 



367 



the town? Please apply yourselves to this and make a fre- 
quent check on fulfilment. Are the bourgeois and philis- 
tines not dodging labour conscription? It is essential to 
exert every effort to discipline them. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



573 

TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE* 

By direct line 

Orjonikidze, R.M.C., Caucasian Front 
Rostov-on-Don 

I authorise you to announce to the mountain people that 
I promise to get financial aid for them passed through the 
Council of People's Commissars. On account of this give 
them up to** 200 million. In a few days Narimanov will 
leave for Petrovsk in accordance with your proposal. You 
can tell Mr. Uratadze in your name that the government 
does not object to his coming to Moscow, but I fully agree 
with you that there should be no hurry with his leaving 
Rostov for Moscow, in view of which I leave it to your 
discretion to fix the day of his departure. 376 On the question 
of land relations you can act independently, reporting, how- 
ever, on the measures you take in this sphere. Please send 
information more often. I request you to expedite the trans- 
fer of units to the South-Western Front. 

Lenin 

Written on April 15, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten text, 

added to and signed 
by Lenin 



* At the bottom of the telegram Lenin added the words: "Please 
transmit this tonight by direct line to Rostov-on-Don. Lenin." — Ed. 

** The subheading and the words "I promise ... give them up to" 
are in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



368 



V. I. LENIN 



574 

TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY 

16. IV. 1920 

Comrade Dzerzhinsky, 

Give instructions, please, for a very strict check-up. 
Cannot impartial people, not Petrograders, be appointed 
for the check-up? 

I have heard also from another source (besides the pres- 
ent letters + Kalmykova) that in this case the local Cheka 
behaved scandalously. 

The matter must be sifted to the bottom, and quickly. 

Be so kind, when the case is finished, to return to me 
the enclosed documents and have your secretary send me 
a telephone message about the result. 377 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



575 

TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 

16. IV. 1920 

Comrade Vladimir Dmitrievich, 

Will you please, if you have now recovered (when you are 
fully recovered), 

1) make a check through witnesses without any publicity; 

2) summon Gil and, for a start, only reprimand him 
(mildly), and warn him that in view of his good behaviour 
up to now you are limiting yourself to the smallest meas- 
ure of punishment, without any entry in his service book, 
but in the event of a repetition it will be bad for him. 378 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1958 Printed from the original 

in the book: A. A. Struchkov, 
Lenin i narod (Lenin and the 
People), Moscow 



TELEGRAM TO G. L. PYATAKOV. APRIL 20, 1920 



369 



576 

UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION 
ON A. V. LUNACHARSKY'S LETTER 

Comrade V. I. Lenin, Chairman of the Council of People's Com- 
missars 

You forwarded me a telegram from Kazan complaining about the 
lack of currency notes. I have received similar telegrams from Vyatka 
and Vologda gubernias. In all these places, because of the lack of 
money, teachers have not received salaries for three months. 

Thus, it turns out that in the absolutely starving gubernias teach- 
ers go hungry for lack of foodstuffs, while in the producing guber- 
nias such as those of Kazan, Vologda and Vyatka, in which teachers 
in fact could feed themselves, they are starving through lack of money. 

I earnestly request you, Vladimir Ilyich, to issue some sort of di- 
rective or to put this before the Council of People's Commissars, so 
that currency notes issued for the needs of the gubernias will be 
divided proportionately, i.e.: where there is a 10-20% shortage, this 

shortage should be spread among all the departments. Otherwise. 

what happens in practice is that absolutely all, except those engaged 
in education, receive their salaries.... 

To the Narrow Council: please put this through. Even 
more: it is necessary to give preference to teachers. 

Lenin 

17/IV. 

Written on April 17, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

577 

TELEGRAMS TO G. L. PYATAKOV 

1 

Pyatakov 

Council of Labour Army 1 
Ekaterinburg 

In confirmation of Comrade Vladimirsky's telegram, the 
Council of People's Commissars instructs all local insti- 
tutions of the Cis-Urals to be extremely moderate and cau- 
tious as regards the new administrative division of the 



370 



V. I. LENIN 



gubernias. The Council of Labour Army 1 should also be 
guided by this directive and, in particular, not set up any 
special commissions on this question. 379 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

20/IV. 20 



Pyatakov 

Council of Labour Army 1 
Ekaterinburg 

At its sitting on 20/IV. 20, the Council of People's Com- 
missars decided: to reprimand the Council of Labour Army 
1 for its insufficiently serious attitude towards the question 
of the new division of the gubernias, and to demand in 
future more thorough preparation of the matter so that 
there can be no contradictory reports from the localities. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



20/IV. 20 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from 
the typewritten texts 
signed by Lenin 



578 

TO THE PETROGRAD SOVIET 



380 



Comrades, 

I earnestly request you, in all cases when Comrade Gorky 
approaches you on such matters, to afford him every as- 
sistance; if there are any obstacles, stumbling-blocks or 
objections of one kind or another, please let me know what 
they are. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

22/IV. 1920 



First published in 1925 
in the book: K godovshchine 
smerti V. I. Lenina. 
1924—21 yanvarya—1925 

(On the Anniversary 
of the Death of V. I. Lenin, 
1924-January 21-1925), 
Moscow-Leningrad 



Printed from the original 



TO G. V. CHICHERIN. MAY 1920 



371 



579 

INSTRUCTION ON L. B. KRASIN'S NOTE 

Ekonomicheskaya Zhizn should be prohibited from printing de- 
tailed information about fuel. It is quite possible that the offensive 
by the Poles is partly due to our laxity in this respect. We are past 
masters at proving by statistics in our newspapers the inevitability 
of our own demise for all kinds of reasons. 

To Rykov: I think this is true. Your opinion? 381 

Written in April, prior to 18, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



580 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

Comrade Chicherin 

Comrade Chicherin, 

I would ask you and Fineberg (or if you are too busy, 
then a comrade at your choice who has an excellent knowl- 
edge of the British socialist movement) to look through 
my pamphlet, or the chapter on Britain,* and advise me 
whether I have made any mistakes or errors of tact. If it 
is no trouble I would particularly ask that the actual cor- 
rections be written down separately in pencil. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written early in May 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



* See V. I. Lenin, "Left- Wing" Communism — an Infantile Dis- 
order (present edition, Vol. 31, pp. 17-118).— Ed. 



372 



V. I. LENIN 



581 

TO N. A. SEMASHKO 



3. V. 1920 



If Comrade Semashko is absent, then for Comrade Solo- 
vyov 

Comrade Semashko, 

Please receive the bearer, Comrade Dmitry Nikitich 
Yeroshenkov, a doctor's assistant. He has been recommended 
to me by a very reliable comrade. Comrade Yeroshenkov has 
a few weeks to spare (until the special assignment we are 
giving him) and during that time would like, on the one 
hand, to study up on medicine and, on the other, to carry 
out medical work. Will you please help him. 



P.S. The comrade has invented a very practical disinfect- 
ing chamber. It should be tested and used. 



Felix Kon 
Kiev 

Copy to Rakovsky 
Kharkov 

Regarding Vinnichenko we agree in principle. Reach 
agreement with Rakovsky on details. 382 Report briefly on 
the military situation and prospects. 



Yours, 



Lenin 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



582 

TO F. Y. KON* 



Lenin 



Written on May 4, 1920 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



Transmitted by direct line. — Ed. 



TO THE SECRETARIAT OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). MAY 1920 373 



583 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 383 

Comrade Trotsky, 

I think Chicherin is right: we should reply at once ag- 
reeing 1) to the suspension of hostilities (a) in the Crimea 
and (b) in the Caucasus (every word must be carefully 
considered) and 2) to negotiations on the conditions for 
clearing the Crimea on the principle (not more) of a general 
amnesty for the Whites and 3) to participation of a British 
officer in the negotiations with Wrangel. The text of 
Chicherin's reply to be discussed in the Politbureau today, 
so that a reply can be sent tonight. 

Lenin 

We shall collect votes by telephone. 

Written on May 4, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



584 

TO THE SECRETARIAT OF THE C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) 384 

I propose a directive that all articles about Poland and 
the Polish war be vetted by editors-in-chief on their per- 
sonal responsibility. We must not overdo it, i.e., not des- 
cend to chauvinism, always draw a line between the Polish 
landowners and capitalists and the Polish workers and 
peasants. 

Lenin 

Written in May, 
after 5, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



374 



V. I. LENIN 



585 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

Members of the Orgbureau: 

Should we not adopt a decision such as the following: 
Directive of the C.C., R.C.P. to the Ukrainian C.C.: 
double the number of food workers by ruthlessly stripping 
for this purpose all People's Commissariats except that of 
military affairs. 

Lenin 

7/V. 

Written on May 7, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



586 
TO BASIN 

7. V. 1920 

Comrade Basin, 

Please convey my thanks to the 30th Regiment of Red 
Communards of the Turkestan Front for the macaroni and 
flour, which I have handed over to the children of the city 
of Moscow. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 



587 

TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 385 

This runs counter to the Central Committee decision. 
It can have disastrous consequences. On no account is it 
permitted by the Central Committee. We categorically 



TO A. Y. BADAYEV. MAY 16, 1920 



375 



demand that implementation be stopped and the decision 
rescinded. 

Lenin* 

Written in May, not earlier 
than 7 and not later 
than 12, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the handwritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



588 

TELEGRAM TO L. B. KRASIN 

In code 

Comrade Krasin 

The substance of the Politbureau's decision communi- 
cated to you was that all agreements concluded by you in 
gold currency should first be endorsed by the Politbureau. 
It is absolutely necessary to economise gold to the utmost. 
The Politbureau sees no business grounds for rescinding 
its decision. 

On behalf of the Politbureau, 

Lenin 

May 11, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



589 

TO A. Y. BADAYEV 

16. V. 1920 

Comrade Badayev or his deputy 
Petrograd 

Please supply the Petrograd group of the State Commis- 
sion for Electrification (the person in charge is Shatelen) 
with 50 Red Army men's rear area food rations and 9 



The telegram is signed also by Trotsky. — Ed. 



376 



V. I. LENIN 



family food rations, without taking away the civilian ration 
cards. 

Please let me know by telephone message exactly how 
many have been issued and when. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



590 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 

25. V. 1920 

In connection with the C.C. directive for tightening up 
general discipline, particularly for persons on duty on Sun- 
days and holidays, 

I request you immediately to draw up and give me for 
signature regulations 

concerning responsible persons (Glyasser, Volodicheva, 
Kizas and others) on duty in the Secretariat of the Council 
of People's Commissars and the Council of Defence specially 
on Sundays and holidays (also on weekdays). Hours and 
so on. 

Lenin 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



591 

RADIO-TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 

By radio 

Eliava for Frunze 
Turkestan Commission 
Tashkent 

What is the position with oil, what are the stocks, are 
the oil wells intact, what is the volume of production, 
what measures are being taken to increase it, what amount 



TO LYDIA FOTIEVA. MAY 27, 1920 



377 



is allocated for transportation and what are the require- 
ments of the local railways?* 

Lenin 

Written on May 25, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



592 

TO ALL PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 386 

especially Commissar for Agriculture 
Commissar for Food 
and Commissar for Labour 

26. V. 1920 

Please give every possible assistance towards the speed- 
iest organisation of the train "Northern Caucasus" and 
staffing it with efficient political workers and instructors. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



593 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 

Add to the Moscow and Petrograd Soviets (in communicat- 
ing today's decision on market gardens) 387 that we are also 
expecting them to adopt measures for taking stock of and 
confiscating surpluses from the suburban market garden- 
ers.** 

Written on May 27, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



* At the end of the radio-telegram Lenin added the words: "Get 
the radio station to sign." — Ed. 

** The document bears a note by Fotieva: "In the minutes or on- 
ly in the telephone message?" in which V. I. Lenin underlined three 
times the words "only in the telephone message". — Ed. 



378 



V. I. LENIN 



594 

INSTRUCTION ON THE TELEGRAM 
FROM THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE CAUCASIAN FRONT 388 



This to be permitted only on condition: 

1) Of the special responsibility of definite local com- 
rades. 

2) Of special measures for disarmament. 

3) Of not releasing particularly dangerous individuals 
(lists through the Vecheka). 

Written in May, 
not earlier than 27, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



595 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 



Comrade Chicherin, 

Be sure to take advantage of Comrade Stalin's presence 
in Moscow (for 2 or 3 days) to have a talk personally with 
him and to collect (at once and after his journey, that is, 
to have more sent from the front) all material concerning 
British help for Wrangel. 

Carefully collect it all and publish it within a week or 
two with a calm (without any abuse) Note of protest, 
showing that Britain deviated from the truth. 389 



Greetings, 

Lenin 



P.S. I have sent Bukharin (for you, too) my letter to the 
British workers. Ring up Bukharin. 

Written on May 30, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN. JUNE 2, 1920 



379 



596 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE NIZHNI-NOVGOROD 
GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Gubernia Executive Committee 
Nizhni 

According to information received, by a decision of the 
Nizhni-Novgorod Gubernia Executive Committee there was 
no loading of grain freights on Sunday, May 30. Bearing 
in mind that supplies for the Western Front, Petrograd and 
Moscow are almost exclusively water-borne, a stoppage in 
loading, even if only for one day, is impermissible and 
criminal. Take measures to prevent any repetition of such 
facts in future, and urgently report execution to me. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on May 31 or 
June 1, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Fotieva's handwriting 

signed by Lenin 



597 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Comrade Stalin 
Kremenchug 

To be handed only personally to Stalin for personal 

decoding 

The situation on the Western Front has turned out to 
be worse than Tukhachevsky and the Commander-in-Chief 
thought, hence the divisions you asked for must be sent 
there, but no more can be taken from the Caucasian Front, 
because there are insurrections there and the position is ex- 
tremely alarming. Trotsky is arranging to send you rein- 
forcements from the Crimean divisions, which may enable 



380 



V. I. LENIN 



you to take two or three of them for the Kiev direction. 
Try to bring up the units and at all costs follow up the 
offensive with greater vigour. You, of course, will rem- 
ember that, by a decision of the Politbureau, the offensive 
against the Crimea has been halted pending a further de- 
cision of the Politbureau. 390 



Please inquire of all the members of the C.P.C. {and 
Comrade Kamenev) by telephone: 

whether they agree to include in the "constitution" 
(confirmed yesterday) of the Narrow Council 391 an adden- 
dum that matters can also be submitted to the Narrow Council 
on the proposal of the Chairman of the Council of People's 
Commissars. 

Write all their replies down on it. 



Lenin 



Written on June 2, 1920 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



598 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 



Lenin 



2/VI. 



Agree: 



Disagree: 



Written on June 2, 1920 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



599 

INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY 



Telephone Bryukhanov: if Belenky does not absolutely 
guarantee the delivery, and quickly, then it is obligatory 
at once to permit independent procurements. It is criminal 



TO L. D. TROTSKY. JUNE 30, 1920 



381 



to lose Baku because of the idiocy or obstinacy of officials 
of the Food Commissariat. 

Lenin 

2/6. 

Written on June 2, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 

600 

TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 393 

Orjonikidze 

Revolutionary Military Council of the Caucasian Front 

I have received your fretful letter. You are wrong to 
regard the inquiry I am obliged to make as distrust. I hope 
you will have dropped this misplaced aggrieved tone by 
the time we meet. 

Lenin 

Written on June 3, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

601 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 394 

This is sheer utopia. Won't it cost too many lives? We 
will be sacrificing a host of our soldiers. We must think 
this over and weigh it up ten times. I suggest replying to 
Stalin: "Your proposal for an offensive against the Crimea 
is so serious that we should make inquiries and give it 
most careful consideration. Wait for our reply. Lenin, 
Trotsky r* 

Written on June 3, 1920 

First published in part 
in 1960 in the book: 
Istoria grazhdanskoi voiny 
v SSSR. 1917-1922, Vol. 5 

First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



* In the typewritten copy there follow the words: "In Lenin's 
handwriting." — Ed. 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



382 



V. I. LENIN 



602 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

Krestinsky. Urgent. 

(Enclose the Siberian telegram on the census and Popov's 
comment.) 

I suggest collecting the votes of the Politbureau members 
today, by telephone, for a decision such as the following: 
the census in Siberia to be definitely carried out si- 
multaneously with Russia; moreover, in place of the 
dubious local people suspected of supporting the Kol- 
chak regime, workers to be called in from the famine- 
stricken gubernias of Russia. 
If they do not agree, the Politbureau is to be called to- 
morrow, 5. VI, in the morning. Less than 1,000 workers 
are needed. They can easily be transported and will be of 
great use. 

Written on June 4, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



603 

TO V. V. VOROVSKY AND V. P. MILYUTIN 

Comrade Vorovsky (State Publishers) 

and Comrade Milyutin (Supreme Economic Council) 

The Kirghiz comrades are asking for help in order to 
acquire 

a type foundry, 
a print-shop 
and paper. 

Will you please receive them and give them every assist- 
ance. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

4/VI. 1920 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH K. A. ALFEROV. JUNE 4, 1920 383 



604 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 395 
1 

Comrade Trotsky, 

The Commander-in-Chief must be informed and asked 
for his opinion. When you have received it, give me your 
conclusion at the meeting of the Council of Defence, or let 
us talk it over (if it does not end too late) by telephone. 

Lenin 

2 

There is some capriciousness here, I dare say. But the 
matter needs to be discussed urgently. And what extraor- 
dinary measures should be taken? 

Lenin 

Written on June 4, 1920 Printed from 

the typewritten copy 



605 

EXCHANGE OF NOTES WITH K. A. ALFEROV 396 
TO K. A. ALFEROV 

Comrade Alferov, 

Is Takhtamyshev in your service? Are you feeding him 
badly? Why is he so thin and pale? 

K. A. ALFEROV'S REPLY 

He is a member of the Supreme Board, lives on the Soviet ration, 
works unlimited hours. Alferov. 

TO K. A. ALFEROV 

He must be given a higher ration, one way or another. 
Such a situation can't be tolerated. An exception must 
be made. 

Written on June 4, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



384 



V. I. LENIN 



606 

TO S. I. BOTIN 

4/VI. 1920 

Comrade Botin, 

You told Comrade Belenky that the experiments could 
be made on Friday (i.e., today). 397 A special military-po- 
litical circumstance has arisen, which may mean our losing 
many extra thousands of Red Army men within the next few 
days. It is therefore my absolute duty to request insistently 
that you hasten the experiment and carry it out today with- 
out fail, if there is the slightest possibility (all the manual 
work, such as regulating the engine, you should assign 
to others, not occupying yourself with trifles). 

Will you please answer me at once by the messenger, 
as fully and exactly as possible. I would not be hurrying 
you if an immediate political-strategic decision of great 
importance were not called for. 

Answer in detail 

(1) Can you speed things up to the maximum extent? 

(2) When will you carry out the first experiment and 
when (approximately) will you complete it? 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



607 

TO V. A. OBUKH 

5/VI. 1920 

Dear Vladimir Alexandrovich, 

I have just heard from Maria Ilyinichna of the death 
of your son. We were both stunned by the news! Heart dis- 
ease, I take it. On behalf of myself, of Nadezhda Konstan- 
tinovna, and of Maria Ilyinichna, permit me to press your 
hand hard and that of your wife, whose acquaintance, 



TELEGRAM TO IRKUTSK GUBERNIA E.C. JUNE 10, 1920 385 



unfortunately, I have not had a chance to make. You need 
all your strength to help you both bear this blow, worn 
out as you are by overwork. And bear it you must, for we 
have so few functionaries. Again, a very firm handshake! 

Wholly yours, 

Lenin 

First published in 1960 Printed from the original 

in Voprosy Istorii 
KPSS No. 2 



608 

TELEGRAM 
TO THE IRKUTSK GUBERNIA EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 
OR GUBERNIA REVOLUTIONARY COMMITTEE 

10. VI. 1920 

1) Gubernia Executive Committee or Gubernia Revolution- 
ary Committee 

Irkutsk 

2) Copy to Smirnov, Chairman of the Siberian Revolution- 
ary Committee 

Omsk 

Please give every assistance to my comrade in exile in 
Siberia, Ivan Lukich Prominsky, railway-truck greaser at 
the Innokentyevskaya Depot. Address: House of Lukyanov 
No. 195, 4th Torgovaya, Innokentyevskaya. Also convey 
my greetings to him by telegraph and, finally, please trans- 
fer him to a better place on the Altai railway. He is already 
old. Wire what you have done. 

Lenin 



First published (facsimile of the 
copy) in 1924 in Ogonyok 
No. 34 



Printed from the original 



386 



V. I. LENIN 



609 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 



This is blatant lying and trickery designed for fools. 

They have given arms, they are giving coal and a fleet — 
and they make this statement through "Wise" ( = Bullitt?). 

I advise: 1) Send a coded message to Krasin: "that sco- 
undrel Lloyd George is fooling you in the most vile and 
shameless manner, don't believe a word, and fool him 
threefold". 

2) To Curzon: a derisive telegram (of course, when you 
had already given arms, he, not you, started an offensive, 
and when you had given coal, he, not you, set the ships 
in motion, and so on in that strain). 



In view of the extreme importance and topicality of the 
photographs and documents brought by Comrade Goikhbarg 
of the court trial of Kolchak's ministers, I order that copies 
of these photographs and documents, together with Com- 
rade Goikhbarg's brief comments, be prepared immediately 
for making a number of motion pictures for the widest 
distribution. 

Report fulfilment to me twice weekly. 



Lenin 



Written on June 11, 1920 
First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



610 

TO D. I. LESHCHENKO 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



Written on June 12, 1920 

First published in 1925 
in the book: G. Boltyansky, 
Lenin i kino (Lenin and the Cinema) 
Moscow-Leningrad 



Printed from 
the text of the book 



TO A. M. HELLER. JUNE 18, 1920 



387 



611 

TO THE FUEL DEPARTMENT OF THE MOSCOW 

SOVIET 

16. VI. 1920 

Dear Comrades, 

I enclose herewith the decision of the Council of Labour 
and Defence of 11. VI, 399 and again specially ask you to 
give this question the most serious attention. 

The Moscow population can and should be mobilised to 
a man to haul out of the forests by hand a sufficient quant- 
ity of firewood (say, one cubic metre per adult man in 
3 months — the experts can figure it out more exactly; I 
mention a figure as an example) to stations on the railways 
and narrow-gauge lines. 

Unless heroic measures are taken, I shall personally get 
a decision put through the Council of Defence and the C.C. 
not only for the arrest of all the persons responsible but 
for their execution. Inactivity and negligence cannot be 
tolerated. 

With communist greetings, 

Lenin 

First published on September 26, Printed from the original 

1942, in Pravda No. 269 



612 

TO A. M. HELLER 400 

18. VI. 1920 

Comrade Heller, 

I am sending you all the materials (in my possession). 
Make up an accurate list of them at once. 
I shall obtain Avanti! and send it. 

Make a list of the most important documents and a trans- 
lation of those that are extremely important, showing the 
deviation of the reformists (especially Turati and Co.) from 
the discipline and decisions. 

(As applying to Serrati, Comunismo No. 10, 15-29.11.1920, 
p. 693: 



388 



V. I. LENIN 



N.B. 

X 

X 



"Simile opera di epurazione — di 'purificazione' ha scritto Fran- 
cesco Misiano nello stesso 'Soviet' — puo essere veramente opportuna ed 



utile, sopratutto se si tratti di chi risolutamente si opponga alia prop- 

401 



aganda per la realizzazione dei principi fissati a Bologna 
meta del nostro movimento."*) 



come 



This is the thing 
to find out, by name and exactly. 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Yours, 

Lenin 

Printed from the original 



613 

TO THE WARDEN OF THE 2nd HOUSE 
OF SOVIETS 

Copy to Comrade Shotman 

June 19, 1920 

Flat No. 439 at the 2nd House of Soviets occupied by 
Comrade A. V. Shotman is, during his absence, at the 
disposal of the Central Committee of the Finnish Com- 
munist Party and cannot be occupied by anyone without 
special permission from the Council of People's Commissars. 

The Finnish comrades, on arrival, are to be given every 
assistance and placed on the allowance list in the usual 
way. Better still, though, on the priority list, as guests. 

Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



*Serrati, Comunismo No. 10, 15-29.11.1920, p. 693: "Such work 
of cleansing — of 'purification — wrote Francesco Misiano in that same 
'Soviet' — can be truly timely and useful, especially if the matter 

concerns those who resolutely oppose propaganda for realising the 

principles, established in Bologna as the aim of our movement" (un- 
derlined by Lenin).— Ed. 



MARKINGS ON P. V. BUKHARTSEV'S TELEGRAM. JUNE 19, 1920 389 



614 

MARKINGS ON P. V. BUKHARTSEV'S TELEGRAM 
CONCERNING 
THE AGREEMENT WITH THE AMERICAN 
CORPORATION, 
AND AN INSTRUCTION TO THE SECRETARY 402 

In the course of the next 36 hours, sanction the agreement 

with the representative of the American Corporation, which 
has the backing of America. 

... Orders, with delivery within 20 days, for twine, machi- 
nery, technical equipment, not later than three months — 
no less than 200 locomotives with tank-cars , trucks, etc. Prin- 
cipal points of agreement: the Corporation, on orders from 
the agent, undertakes in exchange for raw materials to supply 
from abroad miscellaneous commodities, materials, machinery, 
instruments, medicaments, etc., excepting munitions; perfu- 
mery and luxury goods, with delivery at one of the Black Sea 
ports, as indicated by the agent. Second, for the supply of goods 
the agent pays the Corporation in raw materials.... 

... Besides the sums indicated in point 2, the agent pays 
the Corporation in raw materials also a commission amounting 
to ten per cent of the value of the goods supplied. Fourth, the too much! 

raw materials: tobacco, wool, oilcakes, etc., delivered by the 

agent in exchange for the goods supplied are valued at the 
prices ruling on the world market at the time of delivery 

Urgent 

1) Telephone Lezhava (and Scheinman, if he is still here) 
and the members of the Politbureau. 

2) In principle I am for it: (a) bargain: reduce the com- 
mission charges; (b) stipulate precisely: after delivery of 
their goods, delivery of ours or exchange at our port. No 
other way. 

Lenin* 

19/IV. 

Written on June 19, 1920 

First published in 1932 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XX 



* Below, in Lenin's handwriting, is " + Kamenev". — Ed. 



390 



V. I. LENIN 



615 

TO A. N. MEREZHIN 403 

Comrade Merezhin 

I think an additional point should be formulated (on the 
basis of the information of Rafes and others) roughly as 
follows: 

The experience of proletarian dictatorship in the Ukraine, 
especially in those parts of it where there is a mixed pop- 
ulation, and also in Byelorussia (and + ? +? Hungary?), 
has shown that national strife not only in the form of po- 
groms, of which not even the most democratic bourgeois 
republic is free, but also in the form of petty but all-per- 
vading squabbling is practically disappearing. The reasons 
for this: 1) the interest, attention, and all the intellectual 
powers of the workers and working peasants are wholly 
engrossed in the great struggle with the bourgeoisie, a 
struggle that unites the working people of all nations; 
2) the dictatorship of the proletariat suppresses the "freedom" 
of action of the bourgeoisie, petty bourgeoisie and bour- 
geois intelligentsia, which freedom signifies the use of their 
forces, influence and knowledge by the bourgeoisie to in- 
flame the class struggle. 

Cannot 2 or more concrete facts be added? 

Written between June 21 
and July 26, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

616 

TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT 
FOR AGRICULTURE 
AND THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR FOOD 

22. VI. 1920 

Please see that Citizen Tyrkov, one of the last of the 
Mohicans of the heroic group of Narodovoltsi, involved 
in the March trial for the assassination of Alexander II — 
Citizen Tyrkov is now in extreme old age — 

is provided with two or three dessiatines of land from his 
former estate and two cows for his family. 



TO G. V. CHICHERIN. JUNE 24, 1920 



391 



Orders for this to be given urgently by the People's Com- 
missar for Agriculture, Comrade Sereda, 

and by the People's Commissar for Food, Comrade 
Tsyurupa (or his deputy), by agreement, by telegraph, with 
the local gubernia executive committee.* 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

I ask the People's Commissars to sign whether they agree 
or not. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



617 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE 
TO THE PODOLSK UYEZD EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE, MOSCOW GUBERNIA 

22. VI. 1920 

Having once again considered my decision in regard to 
Comrade Vever 405 following his further explanations, I 
inform you that my decision stands and has to be fulfilled. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

618 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 406 

Here Comrade Karakhan is to blame. 
He does not know how things should be done in the Soviet 
Republic: 

1) take an excerpt from the minutes of the Politbureau, 

2) on the basis of this, take a decision of the Narrow 
Council (over my signature) or of the appropriate Peo- 
ple's Commissar, 



* At the top of the document Lenin wrote: "Remind me there 
should be a report on fulfilment from the Commissariat for Agricul- 
ture." 404 -^. 



392 



V. I. LENIN 



3) for non-fulfilment, complain to me formally after 
24 hours, 

4) repeat this many times over. 
Who does not know this, is naive. 



Comrade Zinoviev, Chairman of the Petrograd Executive 
Committee 

The famous physiologist, Pavlov, asks to be allowed to 
go abroad in view of his straitened circumstances. To have 
Pavlov leave the country is hardly advisable, since he has 
previously made statements to the effect that, being a 
truthful man, he could not, in the event of the subject being 
brought up in conversations, avoid expressing himself 
against Soviet power and communism in Russia. 

On the other hand, this scientist is such a great cultural 
asset that his forcible detention in Russia in conditions 
of material insecurity is unthinkable. 

In view of this it would be desirable, by way of escep- 
tion, to allow him a special ration and in general to en- 
sure more or less comfortable circumstances for him ex- 
clusively. 

I have heard that in the Petrograd rest homes life is 
very well ordered for those living there. Something of the 
kind could be done for Professor Pavlov at his apartment 

Comrade Lunacharsky will make the appropriate proposal 
to Comrade Badayev. I ask you to support him in this 
respect. 407 



Lenin 



24/VI. 



Written on June 24, 1920 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



619 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 



Lenin 



25/VI. 



Written on June 25, 1920 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from 
the typewritten text 
signed by Lenin 



TO A. Y. BADAYEV AND D. I. KURSKY. JUNE 29, 1920 393 



620 

TO SIBERIAN SOVIET INSTITUTIONS 

26. VI. 1920 

Please give the bearer, 

Comrade Ilya Danilovich Putintsev, 
every assistance in organising a kindergarten and other 
similar enterprises in his locality, Semipalatinsk Gubernia, 
Pavlodar Uyezd. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Labour and Defence 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



621 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 408 

Check when we asked for this.* 

Reprimand them for impermissible procrastination. They 
are obliged to give a brief reply at once; we shall give them 
a postponement (they should say how many days they ask 
for) only for a more detailed report. 

Give me the text of the telegram in reply to them, 

Written on June 28, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



622 

TELEGRAM TO A. Y. BADAYEV 
AND AN INSTRUCTION TO D. I. KURSKY 

Badayev 

Executive Committee 
Petrograd 

Copy to the Gubernia Land Department 

In the matter of presenting information concerning the 
requisitioning of market-garden produce you have displayed 



* See next document.— Ed. 



394 



V. I. LENIN 



impermissible procrastination. The first telephone message 
was transmitted to you on May 28, the second on June 22, 
and it was only to a telegram of June 26 that your reply 
was forthcoming, signed by secretary Trilisser. A brief 
report must be presented by you without delay. Inform 
us exactly how many days of postponement are required 
for a more detailed report. In the event of a brief report 
not being presented immediately, and a more detailed 
one within a very short period, the persons responsible 
will be called to strict account. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Copy to Comrade Kursky: prosecute them for procrasti- 
nation. 

Report fulfilment.* 

Lenin 



Written on June 29, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Fotieva's handwriting 

added to and signed by 
Lenin 



623 

TO A. M. NIKOLAYEV 

29. VI. 1920 

Comrade Nikolayev, 

We must definitively make use of this protocol and of 
your inclusion (at last our capricious one, 409 too, begins 
to understand that there has to be an expert!), in order 
radically to reorganise the whole business. 

1) Study the protocol carefully and question the mechan- 
ic at the electric station; 

2) on the basis of this decide for yourself whether it is 
worth while to continue the experiments; 



* The text of the telegram from the words "Copy to Comrade 
Kursky" to the end is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. JUNE 1920 



395 



3) if you think it is, we shall draw up a written, precise 
constitution giving all rights to the expert (i.e., to you) — 
with a guarantee from me to the inventor that we shall 
keep it secret. 

And then work is to be started in real earnest, i.e., by 
enlisting experts for a number of auxiliary special assign- 
ments, with the participation of one expert (you) in all se- 
crets. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



624 

TO THE PRESIDIUM OF THE MOSCOW SOVIET 

I enclose an extract from the booklet Cooking Food 
Without Fire (p. 43, No. 1 of "The Housewife's Little 
Library", published by the Supreme Economic Council, 
Moscow, 1918) and ask you to let me know the results of 
the thermos vessel competition announced by the Food 
Department of the Moscow Soviet. 410 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on June 29, 1920 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from 
the typewritten text 
signed by Lenin 



625 

TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 



through Alliluyeva All in code 

and immediate 

Comrade Orjonikidze 

Zinoviev is giving you an important international as- 
signment. 411 In addition, I have gone into the matter and 
I see that you retain all rights and powers through the front 



396 



V. I. LENIN 



and through the supreme local Party body. Once more 
I ask you not to fret and to be patient a little. 

Moreover, you are charged with the leadership of the 
entire foreign and home policy of Azerbaijan and with 
supervising the fulfilment of the directives of the Central 
Committee and People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs 
in regard to Persia, Armenia and Georgia. 412 

Answer. 

Lenin 

Written on June 29 or 30, 1920 

First published in part in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



626 

INSTRUCTION ON I. N. SMIRNOV'S LETTER 



Vladimir Ilyich, 

I am sending you absolutely accurate information verified on the 
spot by our people, about goods intended for shipment abroad lying 
at the wharves. All the goods are packed and in two weeks' time 
will go to the mouth of the river Ob. 

We have done our part. I fear that the cost of these goods will 
be 2-3 times in excess of what we shall be getting from Sweden. 

Put pressure on the Commissariat for Foreign Trade to make use 
of this surplus of goods. 

Smirnov 



Krasin 

1) Return it to me with your comment. 

2) Put on full pressure. 

3) Give me a copy of the measures. 413 

Lenin 



Written between July 3 
and 13, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV. JULY 1920 



397 



627 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

To be handed to the duty commissar 

Zinoviev 
Petrograd 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

I am sending the theses* tomorrow, Monday. Arrange 
for them to be received without any delay. Kobetsky and 
Vorovsky must be commissioned to prepare a business-like 
criticism of the Norwegian Party and the Swedish Left Party 
in time for the Congress. 414 It is necessary to have accu- 
rate and complete material. With regard to translations 
at the Congress itself, the matter must be organised in 
advance: all delegates should be seated according to lan- 
guages, so that there can be simultaneous immediate trans- 
lations for the Germans, French and English. This will 
save time. Russian is obviously necessary, for it is clear 
that people will insist on session in theatres. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Written on July 4, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, of the telegraph form 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

628 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

1 

My booklet on imperialism ought to be published in 
German (and in other languages), for it is always a basic 
issue.** 

Your opinion? 

If yes, to whom should it be entrusted? 

* This refers to "Theses on the Fundamental Tasks of the Second 
Congress of the Communist International" (see present edition Vol. 
31, pp. 184-201).— Ed. 

** This refers to Lenin's book Imperialism, the Highest Stage of 
Capitalism (see present edition, Vol. 22, pp. 185-304).— Ed. 



398 



V. I. LENIN 



2 

I should like to write a new preface. 
What is the time limit? 

3 

Put 1-2 privatdocents on the job of finding sources in 
the best libraries. 

They will find them. 415 

Written in July, 
prior to 6, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



629 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

Comrade Zinoviev, 

I am sending the preface to Imperialism* 
Please have also the Basle Manifesto of 1912 reprinted 
as an appendix. (It should not be difficult to find the Ger- 
man text for you surely have Grinberg's "archives", etc.) 

I have received your theses on the Soviets and the con- 
ditions for their establishment, but have only managed 
to skim lightly through them. I do not object. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

7/ VII. 

What about my speeches and reports at the Congress? 416 
Is it necessary to prepare them in German or French? I 
think the opening speech (and others) should be in Russian 
(for, almost certainly, they will be in theatres with Rus- 
sian audience). They will be translated. And since there 
are the theses I propose, while referring to them, to speak 
extremely briefly. Your opinion? (The agrarian report by 



See present edition, Vol. 22, pp. 189-94.— Ed. 



TO M. M. GRUZENBERG. JULY 8, 1920 



399 



Marchlewski; for me the national report and the opening 
speech, only?) 

Written on July 7, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

630 

TO A. M. NIKOLAYEV 

Comrade Nikolayev, 

I have received your letter of 7/VII. 
I am very glad you have now started properly. 
I advise you (1) to demand more officially and more in- 
sistently that all secrets should at once be revealed to you. 

(2) Set up the installation, if possible, on special wooden 
supports, so that it can be removed instantaneously from 
the truck (perhaps better to use a flat-car instead of a truck) 
and placed on a lorry, on to the ground, and so on (for the 
inventor made a successful experiment, so he says, not 
in a truck). 

(3) If you find that "the game is worth the candle", then 
don't be sparing with money and people for hastening the 
work. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 

Written in July, 
not earlier than 7, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

631 

TO M. M. GRUZENBERG 

Comrade Gruzenberg, 

Comrade Murphy has told me that the translation of 
the theses contains solecisms. 

You must yourself undertake (or immediately organise 
a group to help) good editing of the translation of all the 
theses. 

Consult the English comrades about this. 

Regarding Wijnkoop: I have sent Radek his statement 



400 



V. I. LENIN 



(written by Wijnkoop in English). Whether the English is 
good, I do not know. Take from Radek everything sent by me 
(if necessary, forward this letter to him), and check, please, 
if the English is good. (The content of the statement: the 
Dutch Party is not responsible for "Leftism", the latter is 
the work of certain Dutchmen.) 

(Print only this statement and my statement that I am 
introducing corrections in the text. 417 ) 

Regarding the quality of the English translations, you 
must take good care and set up a group of responsible En- 
glishmen (with their responsibility in written form), other- 
wise we shall be blamed (and so will you). 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

8/VII. 

Written on July 8, 1920 

First published in part in 1960 Printed from the original 

in Voprosy Istorii KPSS No. 3 
Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



632 

TO THE PEOPLE'S COMMISSARIAT FOR HEALTH 418 

According to information in my possession you have in 
storage film for cinema work that is not being used. 

In view of the acute need of the Cinema Department of 
the People's Commissariat for Education and a series of 
urgent works in hand of great agitational importance, please 
turn over at least part of your store to the Cinema Depart- 
ment of the People's Commissariat for Education.* 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on July 8, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV the typewritten text 

signed by Lenin 

* Lydia Fotieva added to this document the words: "On the in- 
struction of V. I., please report fulfilment. L. Fotieva." — Ed. 



TO L. B. KAMENEV AND G. V. CHICHERIN. JULY 10, 1920 401 



633 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

To all the members of the Politbureau: 

I propose that Krasin and the entire delegation be given 
the directive: 

"Be firmer, don't be afraid of a temporary break of the 
negotiations." 419 

Lenin 

9/VII. 



Written on July 9, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



634 

TO L. B. KAMENEV AND G. V. CHICHERIN 

Kamenev and Chicherin 

Comrade Kamenev's plan is utterly incorrect. 420 Our 
business with Britain is purely commercial. Chicherin is 
not right. We should send to Britain only a "tradesman"; 
if they ask 2% kopeks, beat them down to l 3 / 4 kopeks. 

Exposures here are harmful. This is not 1918. We have 
the Comintern for that. All Kamenev's arguments = argu- 
ments against his going. 

Lenin 

10/VII. 



P.S. For the time being we shall appoint Krasin, Vorovsky 
and another 2-3 assistants. 421 

Lenin 



Written on July 10, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



402 



V. I. LENIN 



635 

UNDERLININGS AND AN INSTRUCTION 
ON I. N. SMIRNOV'S TELEGRAM 

Lenin 

Kremlin 

Moscow 

Copy to Tsyurupa, People's Commissariat for Food 

Omsk, July 9. Half of the Altai and Tomsk gubernias are in the 
grip of a kulak movement which we are suppressing by force of arms. 
The cause of the insurrection is lack of commodities. From the insur- 
gent kulaks we are confiscating grain, the whole of which has not 

been threshed. W£ricjiands^ should be sent out urgently to thresh and 

load; unless you send workers we shall not be able to take the grain. 
A minimum of 7,000 is required at once for the Altai alone. If you are 

late, the opportunity will be lost. Ascertain the possibility and in- 
form us, if you cannot send them, we shall immediately cancel the 
order for confiscation, because the kulaks will burn grain that is un- 
threshed and unguarded. 

Smirnov 
Chairman of the Siberian 
Revolutionary Committee 

I insist on all possible help. Directive from the C.C. — 
make every haste. We are sending people. 

Tsyurupa, Schmidt (Commissariat for Labour) and Chief 
Labour Committee: 

Send at once, extremely urgent, exert every effort. 

Lenin 

Written on July 11, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

636 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

Please return this 422 to me with your remarks as to what 
has already been fulfilled and what is being fulfilled, and 
when. 

Lenin 

Written between July 11 
and 15, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



TO THEODORE ROTHSTEIN. JULY 15, 1920 



403 



637 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 



Comrade Sklyansky, 

The international situation, particularly Curzon's pro- 
posal (annexation of the Crimea in exchange for a truce 
with Poland, the Grodno-Byelostok line), 423 demands a 
furious acceleration of the offensive against Poland. 

Is it being done? Everything? Energetically? 

Lenin 

Written on July 12 or 13, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



638 

TO THEODORE ROTHSTEIN 

15/VII. 1920 

Dear Comrade, 

Many thanks for the letters, which always contain ex- 
tremely valuable information. I enclose a letter from my 
wife and ask you to give my regards to your wife and fam- 
ily, whom I met at your home in London. 

About your journey to Russia, I am in two minds. You 
are so very important for the work in London. Let them 
deport you: we shall see if they dare to do so. They would 
have to catch you on something, otherwise there will be a row. 
I am not against your coming "to take a look" at Russia, 
but I am afraid that to quit Britain is harmful for the work. 

As to the delegation, we shall discuss this in all aspects 
in a day or so. The same with the reply to Curzon, 424 who, 
in my opinion, wants to grossly deceive us. He won't suc- 
ceed. 

About sending you literature, I have taken special meas- 
ures. You should know that a Russian has to be sworn 
at 20 times and verified 30 times to have the simplest thing 
done properly. Keep an eye on it and write more often (even 
sometimes to me) — then I shall push things on so that you 
get the missing publications more regularly. 



404 



V. I. LENIN 



I think that your guiding participation (it is possible 
by the pen and secretly) in the Anglo-Saxon movement 
is especially valuable. Here it is highly important to 
straighten out the line. You will receive my pamphlet 
against the "Leftists"* and resolutions (drafts) for the 
Second Congress of the Third International, and I should 
very much like to know your opinion. 

All the very best, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Sent to London 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



639 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 

I refused to sign because it is too sweeping and vague. 

I propose that it be redrafted more exactly (what, in 
concrete terms, does "to take into the network" mean?) and 
submitted a second time together with the instructions. 425 

Lenin 

15/VII. 

Written on July 15, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



640 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO L. B. KAMENEV 

Kamenev 

1. The utmost attention must be paid to collecting En- 
glish writings showing that trade agreements with the So- 



* This refers to Lenin's "Left-Wing" Communism — an Infantile 
Disorder (see present edition, Vol. 31, pp. 17-118).— Ed. 



TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO L. B. KAMENEV. JULY 17, 1920 405 



viet Republics are more advantageous to the British bour- 
geoisie than unprofitable and even ruinous attempts to 
crush them. It is necessary to collect such writings for us, 
and besides this, to discuss with knowledgeable people 
whether in addition it would not be expedient to employ 
some kind of literary bureau or agency for the publication 
of such pamphlets, for giving lectures, and for their dis- 
tribution, etc. You, of course, know whom one should con- 
sult in the first place about this. 

2. It is necessary to organise through special people 
the regular collection, purchase, without stinting money, 
and dispatch to us in 5 copies, of books, articles, pamphlets, 
newspaper cuttings, particularly in English, but also in 
other languages, on questions of modern economics. As 
an example, Keynes's Economic Consequences of the Peace. 
This is the sort of publication that should be collected syste- 
matically. 

3. Do the same, but only through special people, for 
the collection and dispatch to us in 20 copies of periodical 
publications of all kinds, and especially pamphlets and 
minutes of the following four trends: 1 — communist, 2 — 
Centrist (for example, the Independent Labour Party in 
Britain), 3 — anarchist or near to it, 4 — syndicalist, 
etc. 

4. All this should be properly organised by a legal 
agreement, through someone who must be a British subject 
and not a Communist. 

5. Please send me personally: 1 — good recent reference 
books and summary statistical publications, geographical, 
political and economic, particularly in English and French, 
which are more easily obtainable in London, and 2 — two 
good thermos flasks. 



Lenin 



Dictated by telephone on 
July 17, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



406 



V. I. LENIN 



641 

TO THE POLISH BUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

28. VII. 1920 
I recommend the bearer, Comrade Ivan Lukich 

Prominsky , 

a Polish worker, Social-Democrat since 1894. 

I know him well from exile in 1897-1900. Please have 
confidence in him and give him assistance. 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Member of the C.C., R.C.P. 

Printed from the original 



642 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL OF LABOUR 
AND DEFENCE 

The peace proposal by the Poles gives us an opportunity 
for more systematic use of the troops which it was intended 
to transfer from the Caucasian Front to the Western Front. 
I propose, therefore, that the Council of Defence draft a 
decision as follows: 

1. The troops of the Caucasian Front to march through 
the entire Ukraine, the route being so calculated that each 
volost (of the approximately 1,900 volosts of the Ukraine) 
is passed through twice, first by a cavalry unit and then, 
after an interval, an infantry unit, to fulfil (and then check 
fulfilment of) the following tasks: 

(a) the collection of food (according to the quotas to 
be requisitioned); 

(b) the formation locally, i.e., in every village, of a 
double (compared to the quota) stock of food (collected 
in barns, in houses of priests, landowners, the rich, 
etc.), this stock to be guarded by the local peasants 
on their responsibility. 

This double stock is to serve as an exchange fund; 
from this stock held by the peasants, grain will be 
taken after the local peasants have been supplied 



TO THE MEMBERS OF THE C.L.D. JULY 1920 



407 



with goods, Russian and foreign, by agreement with 
the local peasants; 

(c) the compilation (and checking) of a list of "respons- 
ible" peasants (5-20%, etc., of the householders of 
each village, depending on its size, to be selected from 
the local rich peasants starting from the top, i.e., 
according to wealth). 

The "responsible" peasants are to be personally 
answerable for the fulfilment of food and other assign- 
ments of the authorities. 

After the departure of the troops, the special task 
of the local authorities will be to ensure the proper 
and safe keeping of this list (for non-fulfilment of this 
task — death sentence); 

(d) the disarming of the rich peasants. 

Complete collection of arms. Responsibility for 
undiscovered arms rests on the commander of the 
army unit; for non-declaration of arms it rests on 
the person with whom they are found (death sentence), 
and on the whole group of "responsible" peasants (a 
fine, not in money, but in grain and articles; con- 
fiscation of property, arrest; work in the mines); 

(e) assistance in sowing the fields, in repairs to agricul- 
tural implements, and other necessary work (guard- 
ing stores or checking the guard over them, work 
on the railways, etc.) (guarding stores of salt, etc.). 

2. For the purposes indicated above, a commissar or 
instructor to be added to each army unit (to its Communist 
cell) (muster 1,000 people if necessary from the Petrograd, 
Moscow, Ivanovo-Voznesensk workers) to control fulfilment 
of the tasks mentioned. 

3. In "stubborn" volosts or villages, the army units 
either to organise a "third visit" (by troops) or to remain 
longer billeted (up to 2 weeks) for punishment and correc- 
tion. 

4. Part of these decisions to he put through the Defence 
Council, part through the Council of the Labour Army 
and the Council of People's Commissars of the Ukraine. 

5. A highly popular leaflet to be published for the peas- 
ants to explain matters in general, and the idea of the stocks 
of food for exchange for foreign goods, in particular. 



408 



V. I. LENIN 



A commission to be set up at once for publishing such 
a leaflet, and a series of them, as well as a number of in- 
structions. 

For drafting these proposals, a commission to be set 
up at once consisting of Comrades Bryukhanov and Sklyan- 
sky. Comrade Stalin to be asked to be the chairman of the 
commission. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Defence 

Written at the end of July 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

643 

TELEGRAM TO I. N. SMIRNOV 

In code 
by direct line 

Smirnov, Chairman, Siberian Revolutionary Committee 
Omsk 

The Commander-in-Chief has asked for cartridges and 
rifles from Siberia. This demand must be fulfilled immediate- 
ly, without any delay, and the shipments dispatched so 
as to arrive with maximum speed. Ascertain whether more 
of these articles can be given, and if so, give them. Check 
execution. 

Lenin 

Written on August 2, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV Sklyansky's handwriting 

644 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 426 

In code 

Stalin: 

I do not quite understand why you are dissatisfied with 
the separation of the fronts. Let me know your reasons. 
It seemed to me to be necessary since the Wrangel danger 
is increasing. As to a deputy, let me know your opinion 



TO L. B. KAMENEV. AUGUST 1920 



409 



about a candidate. Please inform me also what promises 
the Commander-in-Chief is late with. Our diplomacy is 
subordinated to the C.C. and will never disrupt our 
successes, if the Wrangel danger does not cause vacil- 
lations within the Central Committee. From the Kuban 
area and the Don Region we are getting alarming, even 
desperate, telegrams about the menacing growth of the 
insurgent movement. They are insisting on more speed in 
defeating Wrangel. 

Lenin 

Written on August 3, 1920 
Sent to Lozovaya 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



645 

TO I. T. SMILGA AND M. N. TUKHACHEVSKY 

In code 
by direct line 
3. VIII. 1920 

Comrade Smilga 

and Comrade Tukhachevsky 

All measures should be taken to promulgate in Poland 
on the widest possible scale the Manifesto of the Polish 
Revolutionary Committee. Use our aircraft for this. Report 
what you have done. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text in 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV Sklyansky's handwriting 



646 

TO L. B. KAMENEV 

We should say (in regard to the frontier) that we shall 
give more (the line will be farther to the east), 421 
but not say: "much" more, much farther to the east. 



Written in August, 
not later than 5, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



410 



V. I. LENIN 



647 

TELEGRAM TO J. V. STALIN 

Stalin 

I apologise for the delay in replying, due to the end of 
the work of the Comintern. The plenary meeting of the 
Central Committee did not adopt any decisions* that alter 
the established policy. Britain is threatening war, she does 
not want to wait later than Monday, August 9. I don't 
much believe the threats. Kamenev in London is also stand- 
ing firm so far, and I am convinced that your successes 
against Wrangel will help to put an end to the vacillations 
within the Central Committee. In general, however, much 
still depends on Warsaw and its fate.** 

Lenin 

Written on August 7, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

648 

TELEGRAM 
TO I. T. SMILGA, F. E. DZERZHINSKY 
AND J. MARCHLEWSKI 

In code 

Smilga 

Dzerzhinsky 

Marchlewski 

Your reports are too laconic. Details about the temper 
of the agricultural labourers and Warsaw workers are es- 
sential and urgently needed, as well as about political 
prospects in general. I earnestly request you to reply today 
if possible. 

Lenin 

Written on August 9, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



* Lenin marked off the remaining text of the telegram and 
wrote in the margin: "In code." — Ed. 

**See also present edition, Vol. 31, p. 266.— Ed. 



TELEGRAM TO A. G. BELOBORODOV. AUGUST 10, 1920 411 



649 

TO THE PETROGRAD SOVIET 

10. VIII. 1920 

Please publish an atlas, 
similar to the book 

Railways of Russia (publication of the A. Ilyin Carto- 
graphical Institute. Petrograd, September 1, 1918), 

1) i.e., in a single small-sized book; 

2) maps each on 2 pages of .the book, if possible without 
folding the sheets; 

3) on each map the new boundaries of the gubernias 
(with the same colour as in Ilyin's for each gubernia). 
All uyezd towns; 

4) railways, indicating every station; 

5) new state frontiers; 

6) separately: regions and territories which have fallen 
away from the former Russian Empire (on a separate 
map); 

7) append some historical maps indicating the line of 
the fronts (of the Civil War) at various periods from 
1917 to 1920. 

Lenin 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

650 

TELEGRAM TO A. G. BELOBORODOV 

In code 

10. VIII. 1920 

Beloborodov 

Council of the Caucasian Labour Army 

Rostov-on-Don 

or present whereabouts 

Armavir, etc. 

Please wire how matters stand in regard to the revolts 
in the Caucasus and on the Kuban, whether they are in- 
creasing or weakening, whether all measures have been 



412 



V. I. LENIN 



taken, whether there has been an appreciable arrival of 
new troops, whether there are enough of them, and other 
details. 428 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



651 

TELEGRAM TO K. KH. DANISHEVSKY" 



Danishevsky 

From Chicherin you will learn of our great diplomatic 
success in Britain in regard to Poland. I hope you will 
be fully able to take this into account and cleverly include 
in the terms both Warsaw, as we agreed, and the firmest 
guarantee of all the rest. 

Written on August 11, 1920 

First published in part in 1934 
in the book: K. Danishevsky, 
S. Kamenev, Vospominaniya o Lenine 
(Recollections of Lenin), Moscow 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



652 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

11. VIII. 1920 

Comrade Krestinsky 

Comrade Shapovalov (Alexander Isidorovich) is one of 
the old Party comrades. A Petrograd worker. 

I knew him very well in the Party while still abroad, 
where he always worked like a cart-horse. 



Transmitted by direct line in code. — Ed. 



TO THE NARROW C.P.C. AUGUST 1920 



413 



Now he is ill. He is badly in need of extra nourishment. 

Cannot it be arranged for him to use the Kremlin dining- 
room? I earnestly request this and a ration (increased) 
for him, and help of every kind. 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



653 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 429 

11. VIII. 1920 

Comrade Krestinsky, 

Comrade Lao, Chairman of the Union of Chinese Workers 
in Russia, needs to confer with you on a number of ques- 
tions. Will you please give him this possibility. 

With communist greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



654 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 430 

Narrow Council. 

Please consider the request (§b in the Orgbureau partly). 
It should be complied with to a certain extent, for the strug- 
gle against illiteracy is a task more important than any 
other. 

Lenin 

Written in August, 
not earlier than 11, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



414 



V. I. LENIN 



655 

TO D. I. KURSKY 

Comrade Kursky, 

Who is it publishes so badly? 431 

Chaos. Even the heading is not clear. 

A collection of trivia — and of proclamations. 

Who edited it — some stupid person or a saboteur? 

The most important legislation in force now, 1920, ought 

to be published in a similar volume. 

Lenin 

Written in August, 
not later than 12, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

656 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

Should not Smilga be told that it is necessary (after the 
harvesting) to take into the army absolutely all adult men? 
He should. 

With Budyonny moving to the south, it is necessary 
to strengthen the north. 

Written on August 12, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

657 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 432 

Comrade Krestinsky, 

Is it not possible somehow to make a check through a 
strict commission? Voznesensky was working effectively. 

Is there not some irregularity about his removal? perso- 
nal? squabbling? 

Lenin 

12/8. 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



LETTER TO CHICHERIN AND TELEGRAM TO KAMENEV 415 



658 

TELEGRAM TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

Zinoviev 

Smolny 

Petrograd 

Krzhizhanovsky reports that the Chairman of the Hous- 
ing Committee for the Poor, at No. 15, Alexandrovsky Pros- 
pekt, Petrogradskaya Storona, is threatening Professor Hein- 
rich Graftio, who occupies flat No. 3, with house-searches 
and confiscation of his property. 

Graftio is a respected professor, who is on our side. He 
must be protected against the arbitrary action of the Chair- 
man of the Housing Committee for the Poor. Please report 
fulfilment. 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on August 13, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the text 

in Collected Works, in Fotieva's handwriting 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 signed by Lenin 



659 

LETTER TO G. V. CHICHERIN 
AND A TELEGRAM TO L. B. KAMENEV 

14. VIII. 1920 

Comrade Chicherin, 

I hope you will fully inform Kamenev of all the facts 
showing that France and Daszynski are torpedoing the meet- 
ing in Minsk? 433 

This is essential. Very, very much so. 

Danishevsky must be told that he should begin with a 
solemn declaration of 

(a) independence and sovereignty 

(b) a frontier giving more than Curzon's 434 

(c) no indemnities. Isn't that so? 

In reply to Kamenev's request I am sending you for cod- 
ing: 



416 



V. I. LENIN 



To Kamenev in code 
In my opinion, the whole point is that France and Das- 
zynski are torpedoing the actual meeting in Minsk. They 
will probably also prevent the armistice. I am hoping that 
Britain will be unable to fight, and without her everything 
falls to the ground. There is practically no news from Po- 
land. The little there is confirms our decision at the C.C. 
plenum, namely, extreme vigilance, and we are bound to 
win this campaign. That we have roused the workers — 
this is already no small gain. Lenin. 

With communist greetings, 

Lenin 

P.S. Britain is trying to prove that we are torpedoing 
the meeting. All the documents must be sent urgently to 
Kamenev. 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



660 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 

The Commander-in-Chief dare not fret. If the military 
department or the Commander-in-Chief does not reject the 
idea of capturing Warsaw, we must capture it (what extra 
measures for this? tell me). 

To talk of expediting the armistice when the enemy is 
attacking, is idiocy. 

Once the Poles have gone over to an offensive along the 
entire line, one should not whimper (like Danishevsky) for 
that is ridiculous. 

A counter-move should be devised: military measures (en- 
veloping, dragging out all negotiations, etc.). 

Written in August, 
not earlier than 14, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA. AUGUST 18, 1920 



417 



661 

TO THE ADMINISTRATION OF HEALTH RESORTS 
AND SANATORIA OF THE CAUCASUS 

17. VIII. 1920 

Please do everything to help provide the best accom- 
modation and treatment for the bearer, 

Comrade Inessa Fyodorovna Armand, with her sick son. 

Please afford these Party comrades, who are personally 
known to me, complete trust and every assistance. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

662 

TELEGRAM TO K. KH. DANISHEVSKY 

Danishevsky 

It is ridiculous to complain of the enemy's perfidy while 
there is still no armistice. Keep cool and absolutely 
firm, not yielding one iota, until the Poles show they 
seriously want peace. 

Lenin 

Written on August 17, 1920 
Sent to Minsk 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

663 

TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA 

In code 

Smilga 

The offensive of the Poles makes it very important for 
us to increase our pressure, if only for a few days. Do every- 
thing possible. If you consider it useful, issue an order to 



418 



V. I. LENIN 



the troops telling them that by a tenfold effort now, they 
will ensure for Russia favourable terms of peace for many 
years. 

Lenin 

Written on August 18, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

664 

TELEGRAM TO I. T. SMILGA 

19/VIII. 

Smilga 
Minsk 

Comrade Trotsky will inform you in detail of the decision 
of the Politbureau, 435 from which you will learn that we 
fully share your view. It is essential to strain all efforts so 
that the Byelorussian workers and peasants, even if in bast 
shoes and unclothed, but immediately, with revolutionary 
speed, would give you three and four times as many rein- 
forcements. 

Further, agitation from aeroplanes for the Polish workers 
and peasants, to the effect that their capitalists are prevent- 
ing peace and are condemning them to needless blood- 
shed, should be increased tenfold. 

Lenin 

Written on August 19, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV the typewritten copy 

665 

TELEGRAM TO KARL RADEK 

Please dispatch in code 

Smilga for Radek 

We shall take your considerations into account. Since 
you are going to see Dzerzhinsky, please insist on ruthless 
crushing of the landowners and kulaks as quickly and ener- 
getically as possible, as also on real help for the peasants 



TO M. N. POKROVSKY. AUGUST 1920 



419 



by giving them land and forests of the Polish gentry. 
Report in more detail, check locally. 

Written on August 19, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

666 

TELEGRAM TO V. P. ZATONSKY 



Please dispatch 

to Zatonsky 
in code 

(Sklyansky knows the address and code) 
Let us know in greater detail what you are doing to raise 
the Galician peasants. Armaments have been sent to you. Are 
they sufficient? Crush the Polish landowners and the kulaks 
ruthlessly so that the farm hands, and the mass of the peas- 
ants, feel there has been a sharp turn in their favour. Are 
you using aeroplanes for agitation? 436 

Lenin 

Written on August 19, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



667 

TO M. N. POKROVSKY 

Comrade Pokrovsky 

1) What is the legal status of Proletcult? 437 

2) What is the nature of its leading centre and 3) by 
whom was it appointed? 

4) How is it financed by the People's Commissariat for 
Education? 

5) Anything else of importance about the position, role 
and results of the work of Proletcult. 

Lenin 

Written in August, 
not later than 20, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



420 



V. I. LENIN 



668 

TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

All in code 

Orjonikidze 

We have passed a decision through the Politbureau to- 
day for you to go without fail to Rostov for closest partici- 
pation in liquidating the landings in the Kuban and Black 
Sea area. 438 Strain every effort and push this on, report to 
me more frequently. Get someone to take your place in 
Baku. Another request: don't forget you promised me to 
arrange for treatment for Inessa Armand and her sick son, 
who left on August 18; they are, probably, already in Ros- 
tov. 

Lenin 

Written on August 20, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

669 

TELEGRAM 
TO KARL RADEK, F. E. DZERZHINSKY 

AND ALL MEMBERS 
OF THE POLISH CENTRAL COMMITTEE 

In code 

Smilga 

for Radek, Dzerzhinsky and all members of the Polish C.C. 

If in Seidlitz Gubernia land-hungry peasants have begun 
to seize the landed estates, it is absolutely essential to 
publish a special decision of the Polish Revolutionary Com- 
mittee making it obligatory to give part of the landed 
estates to the peasants and at all costs to ensure concord 
between the land-hungry peasants and the farm hands. 
Please reply. 

Lenin 

Written on August 20, 1920 

First published in part in Printed from the text 

1938 in the journal Bolshevik 
No. 2 

Published in full (in facsimile) 
in 1951 in the book: Felix 
Edmundovich Dzerzhinsky . 
1877-1926, Moscow 



NOTE TO POLITBUREAU OF C.C., R.C.P.(B.). AUGUST 20, 1920 421 



670 

TELEGRAM TO L. B. KAMENEV 
AND A NOTE TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

Kamenev in code 

It is hardly likely that we shall capture Warsaw soon.* 
The enemy there has built up strength and is attacking. 
Obviously, Lloyd George is deliberately dividing up the 
roles with Churchill, using pacifist phrases to conceal the 
real policy of the French and Churchill and duping the Hen- 
derson-and-Co. fools. Do your utmost to bring this home 
to the British workers; write articles and theses for them 
yourself, teach Marxism concretely, teach them to make use 
of the leftward swings of the Hendersons, teach them agi- 
tation among the masses — that is your main task. Lloyd 
George has been duping us with pacifism and has helped 
Churchill to land assistance for the Poles in Danzig. That 
is the essence of the matter. Maintain contact with the Ru- 
manian Ambassador. 

Lenin** 

Comrade Chicherin, 

Send it if you have no objection. If you have, we'll talk 
it over on the telephone. 

Lenin 

Written on August 20, 1920 
Sent to London 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

671 

NOTE TO THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) WITH DRAFT OF A TELEGRAM 
TO V. S. MICKIEWICZ-KAPSUKAS 439 

I propose replying: 

The present moment is definitely unsuitable, while we 
are retreating from Warsaw. Send the most detailed and 

* The word "soon" is in Chicherin's handwriting. — Ed. 
** The telegram is signed also by Chicherin.— Ed. 



422 



V. I. LENIN 



exact information about Lithuania over the signature of 
all the members of the Lithuanian-Byelorussian Central 
Committee and Smilga's opinion. But continue the prepar- 
atory work more cautiously and systematically. 

There is agreement from three members of the Political 
Bureau* 

Lenin 

Written on August 20, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 



672 

TO G. Y. ZINOVIEV 

20. VIII. 1920 

Comrade Zinoviev 

For the Committee of the 1st State Cartographical 
Institute (formerly A. Ilyin's) 
5, Pryazhka 

Thank you very much for sending another copy of the 
atlas Railways of Russia, and please do not forget that if 
a new atlas is to be published giving the new administra- 
tive divisions, it is essential very carefully to collect infor- 
mation from the People's Commissariats about the boun- 
daries both of the new gubernias and also of the Tatar, 
Bashkir and other republics, regions and communes (Ger- 
man, Chuvash), and others. 

It is unlikely that this can be done without a commission 
under the Council of People's Commissars. 

With communist greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

Sent to Petrograd 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

* This sentence, the signature and the words "ore behalf of the 
Politbureau, Krestinsky" were written by Lenin after receiving the 
agreement of the members of the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 
-Ed. 



TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE. AUGUST 1920 



423 



673 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 

Tell Chicherin, 

1) In my opinion, Kamenev is right: we must send our 
reply through him (and in the negative). 

2) Negotiations with Vanderlip to be begun through 
Krasin, exact terms to be ascertained without summoning 
Vanderlip here. 440 

Written in August, 
prior to 21, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

674 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 

Krestinsky 

for the Orgbureau 

I agree with Krestinsky that Preobrazhensky "didn't make 
a success of it". 

It should be more detailed, more agitational, with more 
feeling — and clearer and more business-like. 

Let Zinoviev write it (he will be here tomorrow, 25/8), 
and the Orgbureau will correct it. 441 

Lenin 

Written on August 24, 1920 

rst published in IS 
n Collected Worki 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 



675 

TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

Comrade Sergo, 

I am sending you reports delivered to me. Return them, 
please, with your remarks about the facts: what is true, 
what is untrue. 442 

I daresay you get into a bad temper, on occasion, don't 
you? 



424 



V. I. LENIN 



You ought to get some assistants, perhaps, and direct 
the work more systematically. 

I hope you will not take offence at my remarks and will 
reply frankly what you think you can straighten out and 
correct, and how. 

Greetings, 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written in August, 
prior to 27, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

676 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 

27. 8. 1920 

Narrow Council 

In view of Comrade Vorovsky's extremely serious and 
dangerous illness (typhoid, pneumonia, etc.) please urgent- 
ly authorise the issue of a large grant for treatment and a 
nourishing diet. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



677 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 443 

I agree, with the obligatory addition to this conclusion 
("reprimand"): do not dare to introduce departmental po- 
lemics, do not dare to browbeat the Supreme Economic 
Council, the Commissariat for Food and other People's Com- 
missariats. 

Lenin 

Written on August 27, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO THE NARROW C.P.C. AUGUST 31, 1920 



425 



678 

TO F. E. DZERZHINSKY 

Comrade Dzerzhinsky, 

I enclose a coded message from Comrade Beloborodov. 444 
In my opinion the danger is immense. 
I propose: 

the adoption of a directive from the Political Bureau 
asking the Orgbureau, by arrangement with the Com- 
missariat for Military Affairs and the Vecheka, to draw 
up emergency measures to combat the danger of a re- 
volt and to mobilise sufficient army, Cheka and Party 
forces. 

Please hand all this at once to Comrade Krestinsky (he 
will be away for only a few hours today) and for your part 
adopt all measures at once. 

If we are faced with a revolt on the Kuban, our whole 
policy (which was spoken about in the C.C.) will crash. It 
is necessary, at all costs, to prevent a revolt, and not to 
grudge people or efforts for this. Should we not send Mantsev 
there? 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written in August, 
not earlier than 28, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

679 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 445 

Narrow Council: 

It is essential to centralise and combine aid, distributing 
it correctly. 

Lenin 

31/8. 



Written on August 31, 1920 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



426 



V. I. LENIN 



680 

TELEGRAM TO G. K. ORJONIKIDZE 

2/IX. 1920 

Orjonikidze 
Revolutionary Council 
Caucasian Front 

Your telegram received. There is no point in your being 
indignant. If X's report is false, 446 calmly write ten lines 
of refutation and send it to me by mail. Please add fullest 
details about the progress of the fight against banditry and 
about the arrangements you made in Kislovodsk for the So- 
viet functionaries of whom I spoke here to you person- 
ally.* 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



681 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

Comrade Krestinsky, 

I think the persons responsible for this waste of expen- 
sive paper and printing facilities should be prosecuted, 
fired, and arrested. 447 

Lenin 

Written on September 2, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



*See also Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, Document 464, 
-Ed. 



TO PODOLSK UYEZD FOOD COMMITTEE. SEPTEMBER 6, 1920 427 



682 

INSTRUCTION ON NADEZHDA NIKULINA'S 
LETTER 

Dear Vladimir Ilyich, 

Only my desperate situation compels me to trouble you with a most 
humble request. I am 74 years old, for 51 of them I have served my 

dear Moscow to the best of my strength and ability Knowing how 

crowded are the conditions in which the population is living, I met 
the authorities halfway and voluntarily gave up several rooms in my 
little house. All that remains are rooms that I need for myself or cold 
communicating rooms unsuitable for living in. Now they threaten to 

take these rooms away as well. I implore you to help me A few 

words, written by your order, will be sufficient guarantee for me. 

With sincere respect, 

Honoured Artist of the State Maly Theatre, 

N. Nikulina 

Check and phone that she is to be left in peace. 

Written in September, 
not earlier than 3, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

683 

TELEGRAM TO THE PODOLSK UYEZD FOOD 
COMMITTEE 

Podolsk Uyezd Food Committee 

Copy to Podolsk Uyezd Executive Committee 

The following petition 448 has reached me directly; 

I can testify that Bogdanovo village (popularly known 
as Bogdanikha) is very bad off for food. Will you therefore 
please examine their petition without delay, and alleviate 
their position as much as you can, i.e., by reducing their 
requisition quota as far as possible. 

Please notify me of your decision both in writing and 
by telephone message. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

6/IX. 1920 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



428 



V. I. LENIN 



684 

TO LYDIA FOTIEVA 449 

Lydia Alexandrovna 

Read through, send on to the Science and Technology 
Department and check what has been done (a letter to him?). 



Comrade Trotsky, 

This was received today in reply to my night inquiry 
about "pseudonym" (he has been summoned to us here, and 
inquiries have been made of Gusev 450 ... .* Gusev does not 
object. 

But his report about a big defeat of the 13th Army is 
extremely alarming and extremely important. 

In my opinion, it is necessary to treat this with the ut- 
most seriousness in view of the whole situation and 1) in- 
quire at once of the Commander-in-Chief, 2) raise this eve- 
ning in the C.C. ...* 

...* whether to appoint Frunze commander of the front 
against Wrangel and to put Frunze in at once. 451 I have 
asked Frunze to have a talk with you as soon as possible. 
Frunze says he has studied the Wrangel front, has prepared 
himself for that front and knows (from his experience of the 
Urals Region) the methods of struggle against the Cossacks. 



Lenin 



6/IX. 



Written on September 6, 1920 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



685 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 



Lenin 



Written on September 8, 1920 



First published in part in 1960 
in the book: Istoria grazhdanskoi 
voiny v SSSR. 1917-1922, Vol. 5 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



* In the typewritten copy the text is missing and the words 
"(torn out — impossible to establish)" are written in an unknown 
hand.— Ed. 



TO A. I. RYKOV AND A. M. LEZHAVA. SEPTEMBER 10, 1920 429 



686 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

In code 
9. IX. 1920 

Trotsky 

I consider of the utmost importance Yakovlev's proposal 
concerning the Crimean army which was passed on to you 
from Gusev. I advise that the proposal be adopted and a 
special check instituted, and, independently of this, an ap- 
peal-manifesto be prepared at once over the signatures of 
yourself, Kalinin, myself, the Commander-in-Chief, Brusi- 
lov and a number of other former generals, with precise 
proposals and guarantees, and also mentioning the fate of 
Eastern Galicia and the increasing insolence of the Poles. 
I request your earliest opinion, or better still your draft 
of the manifesto. 452 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



687 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO A. T. RYKOV 
AND A. M. LEZHAVA 

Rykov 

Supreme Economic Council 
Lezhava 

People's Commissariat for Foreign Trade 

The various big timber export deals concluded by our 
London Trade Delegation are of great political and econom- 
ic importance. They virtually break the blockade. The 
most serious attention, therefore, should be given to the 
precise and careful execution of these contracts, in accord- 
ance with the terms agreed on. Please give immediately 
all the relevant instructions along these lines and establish 
effective control over their implementation. 



430 



V. I. LENIN 



At the same time there is obvious need for increasing 
our export stock to the utmost, primarily by stepping up 
the procurement of timber for export. In order to make the 
latter a priority job, please draft and submit to the 
Council of People's Commissars as soon as possible a decree 
on the measures that should be adopted, indicating among 
them the organisation of control over the bodies in charge 
of the procurement of raw materials for export. 453 



Comrade Rudakov, Manager of the Fuel Department of the 

Petrograd Commune 

Petrograd 

Copy to the Executive Committee of the Petrograd Soviet 

Please supply firewood to the Commission for Improving 
Scientists' Living Conditions. 

If there is any disagreement as to the amount due to 
them or any objections, please drop me a line. 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on September 10, 1920 
Published on September 18, 1920 
in Ekonomicheskaya 
Zhizn No. 207 



Printed from the text 
in an unknown handwrit- 
ing signed by Lenin 



688 

TO I. G. RUDAKOV 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



Written on September 10, 1920 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIII 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



TO R.M.C. OF CAUCASIAN FRONT. SEPTEMBER 13 OR 14, 1920 431 



689 

TELEGRAM TO V. Y. CHUBAR AND V. N. KSANDROV 

By direct line 

Chubar 

Ukrainian Industrial Bureau 
and Ksandrov 

Central Administration of the Donets Coalfields 

On 10/IX, the Council of Defence resolved to pass a 
strict reprimand on the Ukrainian Industrial Bureau and 
the Central Administration of the Donets Coalfields for fail- 
ing to supply information: 1) in reply to the inquiry of the 
Chief Coal Committee dated 20/VIII, 2) —of the Council 
of Labour and Defence dated 4/IX, and to warn them that 
if a satisfactory reply is not given at once, more serious 
penalties will be meted out to the entire personnel of these 
institutions. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Labour and Defence 

Written on September 
13 or 14, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the text 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV in Fotieva's handwriting 

signed by Lenin 



690 

TELEGRAM 

TO THE REVOLUTIONARY MILITARY COUNCIL 
OF THE CAUCASIAN FRONT 

R.M.C, Caucasian Front 

The Council of Labour and Defence has resolved to pass 
a strict reprimand on the Revolutionary Military Council 
of the Caucasian Front for non-fulfilment of the decision 
of the Council of Labour and Defence dated 25/VI and of 
the order of the Field Headquarters of the Republic dated 
5/VII, 454 and to warn the members of the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Caucasian Front that if they do not 



432 



V. I. LENIN 



strain all efforts to fulfil the decisions indicated, they will 
be arrested and prosecuted. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Labour and Defence 



Written on September 
13 or 14, 1920 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the text 
in Glyasser's handwriting 
signed by Lenin 



691 

TO V. A. AVANESOV 



455 



Order an investigation, with the addition of army Com- 
munists, by agreement with Sklyansky, and provide Com- 
munists yourself (and drop me a line). 



Written on September 14, 1920 

First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the text in 
the secretary's handwriting 



692 

TO M. I. KALININ 



16. IX. 1920 



Comrade Kalinin 



Comrade Kalinin, 

Comrade Ilyin asks that he and his family should be 
left in his old rooms in the former Metropole Hotel until 
the spring, 

because the doctors certify that his wife and children 
are very ill and require the best possible position and 
conditions during an operation to be undergone in the 
winter. 

Knowing Comrade Ilyin since before the revolution, from 
abroad, I earnestly request you to help him arrange this. 

Lenin 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



TO A. M. LEZHAVA. SEPTEMBER 20, 1920 



433 



693 

TO A. M. LEZHAVA 456 

Comrade Lezhava 

(After conferring with Sklyansky, a decision must be 
arrived at as quickly as possible and measures taken.) 

Lenin 

16/IX 

P.S. Such documents should be sent direct to the Com- 
missariat for Foreign Trade, to avoid loss of time. 

Written on September 16, 1920 

First published in part Printed from the original 

on November 24, 1963, 
in Pravda No. 328 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



694 

TO A. M. LEZHAVA 

Comrade Lezhava 20. IX. 1920 

Comrade Lezhava 

You should urgently see Zimmerman and raise the fol- 
lowing in the Politbureau: 

Platten through his courier (Zimmerman, a Communist 
from Switzerland, who is now here and leaves tomorrow, 
21/IX) asks 

for his mandate as trade representative of the R.S.F.S.R. 
in Switzerland to be continued and confirmed, as this 

1) will help him, Platten, to be released from prison (he has 
already begun to serve his 6-month sentence) ahead of time; 

2) will strengthen his position in the communist move- 
ment. 

Platten must be helped with money: he is in dire straits. 

Lenin 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



434 



V. I. LENIN 



# 



695 

MARKINGS ON S. S. KAMENEV'S REPORT 
AND A NOTE TO G. V. CHICHERIN 

2) The limit of territorial concessions on our part can be the fron- 



tier along the river Shara, the Oginsky Canal, the rivers Yaselda and 
Styr and further along the state frontier between Russia and Eastern 
Galicia. Shifting our frontier still more to the east would create 



extremely difficult strategic conditions for us, depriving us of such 
important railway junctions as Baranovichi, Luninets, Sarny and 
Rovno. Moreover, the state of our armies and the strategic position 
in general do not call for such a big sacrifice.... 

# Comrade Chicherin, 

This is the frontier — maximum. Adopted in the C.C: It 
must be repeated exactly. 457 

Lenin 

Written on September 23, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

696 

TELEGRAM TO A. A. JOFFE 

Today in code to Joffe on behalf of the C.C. plenum. 

For us, the crux of the matter is: first, that we have an 
armistice in a short time; second, and this is the main thing, 
that we have a real guarantee of real peace within 10 days. 
Your task is to ensure this and check on the reality of 
the guarantee of actual fulfilment. If you do ensure this, 
give the maximum concessions up to the line along the 
river Shara, the Oginsky Canal, the rivers Yaselda 
and Styr and further along the state frontier between 
Russia and Eastern Galicia. If, however, in spite of all 
our efforts and concessions this can in no way be ensured, 
then your only task is to expose the delay of the Poles and 
definitely prove to us the inevitability of a winter campaign. 

Written on September 23, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



TO S. I. GILLERSON. SEPTEMBER 25, 1920 



435 



697 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 458 

Comrade Chicherin, 
It is necessary: 

1) To put before the C.C. another draft of a precise deci- 
sion: the C.C. prohibits acting in such-and-such a way, 
and demands so-and-so. 

2) To lodge a protest against each violation concretely. 

3) To put through the C.C. the appointment of a respon- 
sible person (not a very "high" one). 

Otherwise the result is nothing but grousing. 

Lenin 

Written in September, 
not earlier than 24, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



698 

TO S. I. GILLERSON 

Very urgent 

Gillerson 
Prague 

Publish at once in the press and inform the Congress 
of the Czechoslovak Social-Democratic Party 459 that Franz 
Benes's mention of a talk alleged to have taken place with 
me on the possibility or impossibility of a proletarian dic- 
tatorship in Czechoslovakia is a lie from beginning to end 
and that not only did I never talk with him but I have 
never even seen him. It goes without saying that my opinion 
of Bela Kun and of the Hungarian Revolution, as quoted 
by Benes, is just as foul a lie. 

Lenin 

Written on September 25, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from 

in Collected Works, the typewritten copy 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



436 



V. I. LENIN 



699 

TO N. A. SEMASHKO 

Comrade Semashko 

Please allow Lyubov Isaakovna Axelrod {Orthodox) to 
remain in Clinic No. 2 (No. 5, Third Neopalimovsky Pereu- 
lok) the whole winter, giving her a comfortable room. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Comrade Semashko, 

Drop me a line about how she is fixed up. She must be 
given assistance. 

Yours, 

Lenin* 

Written on September 25, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the typewritten 

in Collected Works, text, added to and signed 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 by Lenin 



700 

TO THE SIBERIAN REVOLUTIONARY COMMITTEE 

Comrade I. N. Smirnov, 

I am sending you for consideration the following points. 460 
Drop me a line about them. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

1. Attention to be paid to the rural poor of Siberia, who 
are to be supplied with food from the local requisition quo- 
tas. 

2. Tar production to be organised in Siberia, enlisting 
the local Soviets and the population 

(local tar production). 



* The additional text from "Comrade Semashko,..." to the end 
is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



NOTE TO G. M. KRZHIZHANOVSKY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1920 437 



3. The peasants obtain a pood of wheat and mill it into 
the finest flour, getting 18-20 pounds. It would be better 
to mill into simple flour, the peasants will agree to this. 

4. Special attention to be paid to the village black- 
smiths' shops for repairs to agricultural machinery. Charcoal 
to be supplied to them. 

Is it true that there have been instances in Siberia of 
butter being used to grease carts (instead of tar)? 

Lenin 

26. IX. 20 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

701 

NOTE TO G. M. KRZHIZHANOVSKY AND MARKINGS 
ON BULLETIN No. 5 OF THE STATE 
COMMISSION FOR THE ELECTRIFICATION OF 

RUSSIA 461 

Comrade G. M. Krzhizhanovsky 
Gleb Maximilianovich, 

Please return this to me, after reading pp. 20-21, with 
a couple of words. 

Yours, 

Lenin 

... Undoubtedly, in the early stages we, as is done nowadays in 
all Europe and America, have to pay particular attention to the ra- 
tional utilisation of the already existing electro-technical equipment. 
At the present time, the accelerated setting in full motion of our main 

existing power stations, the combined work of a group of stations, 
and the rational use of the electrical networks, may have an import- 
ance^ which it is difficult to overestimate. 

Recently, throughout the provinces, we observe a widespread tend- 
ency towards the construction of new small stations, particularly 
in those cases where it is possible to use some kind of water power. 
However vital this trend may be, we should not forget that from the 
point of view of expediency in the matter of electrification only 
big district power stations are a decisive factor.... 



438 



V. I. LENIN 



... At present three-quarters of the work is finished, and in 
the middle of July we shall start on a final summary for present- 
ing a report on the matter to the Council of People's Commissars. 

Only when this work is completely finished, will I be able to give 
you a more concrete account of what we mean when we speak of the 
electrification of agriculture, industry and transport in Russia, hav- 
ing in view a definite sequence of works embracing, approximately, 
the period of the next ten years. 

G. Krzhizhanovsky 

This is where the question arises: up to now, in all five 
numbers of the Bulletin, we have had only long-term 
"schemes" and "plans", but nothing immediate. 

What exactly (precisely) is lacking for "accelerating the 
setting in motion of the existing power stations"? 

This is the crux. Yet there is not a word about this. 

What is lacking? Workers? Skilled workers? Machinery? 
Metal? Fuel? Anything else? 

A "plan" to obtain everything that is lacking must be 
drawn up and published at once. 

Lenin 

26/IX. 

Written on September 26, 1920 

First published: the note — on Printed from the original 

January 21, 1927, in Pravda 
No. 17; the markings— in 1942 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



702 

TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV 

27. IX. 1920 

Comrade Bryukhanov, 

I am sending you two documents. Will you please read 
them and return both to me: 

1) About Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia. 

We shall raise it in the Council of Defence on 29. IX. 462 
It is necessary to pay the most serious attention and to 
try to meet their requests in the greatest possible degree. 

2) About Tambov Gubernia. 



TO N. I. BUKHARIN. SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER 1920 439 



Pay attention. Is the requisition quota of 11 million poods 
correct? Should it not be cut down? 

With communist greetings, 

Lenin 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

703 

NOTE TO THE SECRETARY 

Ask for information about the circumstances of the loss 
of Pinsk, including that of staffs and materiel. 463 
Was the danger known beforehand? 

Written in September, 
not earlier than 28, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

704 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

Comrade Krestinsky, 

I think we should get a decision passed through the Org- 
bureau, and instruct the Revolutionary Military Council 
to regularise it, that special agents of the Food Commis- 
sariat are included as members of the Revolutionary Milita- 
ry Councils of the fronts with the right to vote on questions 
concerning the Food Commissariat. 

Lenin 

Written in September, 
not later than 29, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

705 

TO N. I. BUKHARIN 464 

Bogdanov has fooled you by disguising (verkleidet) an 
old dispute and trying to shift it onto a different plane. 
And you are taken in by it! 

Written between September and 
December 1920 

First published in 1930 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XII 



440 



V. I. LENIN 



706 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 



Secret 
1/X. 1920 



Comrade Trotsky, 

I enclose herewith information from Comrade Sklyan- 
sky. 465 

It appears that the offensive against the Crimea has 
been put off until 27/X!!! 

Is there a decision of the Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the Republic on this??? 

The Commander-in-Chief boasted to me that by October 
10 (or 8) he would have everything ready for the offensive. 
Does this mean he lied? 

When was it decided to send Budyonny there? Why, even 
without him forces three times as large were promised. 

Finally, if the old plan is to be changed at all, is it not 
enough to give 1 division? 

It turns out that all the calculations of the Commander- 
in-Chief are not worth a damn and are changed weekly like 
those of an ignoramus! Extremely dangerous vacillations! 



Comrade Sverdlov 

Alexei Andreyevich Preobrazhensky is an old Party func- 
tionary who has worked on the railways for more than 20 
years. At the present time he is Chief of the Administrative 
Service of the Samara-Zlatoust Railway. He is now 57-58 
years old. He is extremely overworked and ill and needs 



Lenin 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



707 

TO V. M. SVERDLOV 



TO THE NARROW C.P.C. OCTOBER 3, 1920 



441 



a lengthy rest and treatment. Please give him 3 months' 
leave with pay and rations. 

His address: Samara railway station. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on October 1, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the typewritten 

in Collected Works, text signed by Lenin 

Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



708 

TO L. D. TROTSKY 

Comrade Trotsky, 

I think that both Kamenev and Zinoviev should be sent 
immediately to the Southern Front (and particularly to 
the 1st Mounted Army). The aim — to inspect political work, 
step it up and revitalise it, to accelerate the whole tempo. 
Otherwise we shall not overcome the present mood. 

Lenin 

2/X. 

Written on October 2, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



709 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 466 

Narrow Council: 

It should not be given at all, in my opinion, for 
Headquarters of the R.M.C. of the Western Front can (and 
should) be accommodated in other buildings, even if a bit 
crowded. 

Lenin 

3/X. 

Written on October 3, 1920 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



442 



V. I. LENIN 



710 

TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV 467 

4/X. 

Comrade Bryukhanov, 

1) The description relates to the period of the landing. 
After it was liquidated the feeling and the state of affairs 
changed completely as, incidentally, Lander told me yes- 
terday. 

2) Lander also tells me that precisely now, after the 
successful suppression of a number of revolts (connected 
with the landing), grain collection (chiefly in the Kuban 
area, where there is plenty of grain) has gone forward and 
will go forward. 

3) In Lander's opinion, we can take there more than the 
estimated requisition quota. 

Draw Frumkin's attention to this in a confidential letter 
(not a telegram) to him. We must make the most of this 
opportunity, not lose time (it will be worse later), and ap- 
ply our efforts to the Kuban. 

With communist greetings, 

Lenin 

Written on October 4, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

711 

TO A. I. RYKOV 468 

Comrade Rykov, 

I think we should try bargaining, but concede in the 
end (through the C.P.C.). Bargaining point: redemption be- 
fore expiry, after 30 years, at a heightened valuation of their 
expenditure and labour. 

Lenin 

6/X. 

You will concede a 50-year period for the concession. 

Written on October 6, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO THE ORGBUREAU OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.). OCTOBER 8, 1920 443 



712 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 

6. X. 1920 

Comrade Krestinsky, 

Please raise the question in the Orgbureau. I think more 
should be issued for the sick by way of special diet and a 
decision adopted to improve it, 

by setting up a medical commission. 

For scorbutics and other patients, I think, we should 
at once allow purchases to be made on the free market, 
subject to certain rules (perhaps also a commission and 
with the co-operation of the state farms). 

Regarding the protest of the Petrograd Central Committee, 
I propose that votes be collected. I vote for: 

1) mobilising Zinoviev; 

2) cancelling general mobilisation of men. 

Lenin 

First published in part 
in 1959 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

Published in full in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



713 

TO THE ORGANISING BUREAU OF THE C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) 

8. X. 1920 

Orgbureau of the Central Committee 

In the resolution of the Orgbureau of 7.X (No. 59, 
point 3), 

sub-point b reprimands Comrade Bonch-Bruyevich for im- 
permissibly approaching me on this and "similar petty 
questions". 

I request that this sub-point be cancelled 



444 



V. I. LENIN 



for when visiting the Kremlin hospital I personally 
heard the doctors mention the shortage of food for the pa- 
tients and I myself asked the doctors to give me, through 
Bonch-Bruyevich, their written proposal 

on better feeding of the patients, etc. 

Consequently, there was not even an "approach" to me 
here on the part of Comrade Bonch-Bruyevich. 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



714 

TO TELEGRAM TO L. D. TROTSKY 



In code 

Trotsky only 

In view of the whole situation on the Polish front and 
in connection with it, particularly following my night con- 
versation with Joffe, who energetically assures us of his 
own, and our military expert's, conviction that the Poles, 
in point of fact, will not be able to prevent the armistice 
(by threatening a break, Joffe compelled the Poles to aban- 
don the demand for a definite amount of gold. Joffe says: 
the Poles are afraid of a break even more than we are), 
the Politbureau of the Central Committee instructs the mil- 
itary authorities to incur a certain amount of risk and 
take some units from the South-Western Front for the 
speediest and surest liquidation of Wrangel. 



On behalf of the Politbureau, 

Lenin 



Written on October 10, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO A. M. HELLER. OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1920 



445 



715 

TO N. I. BUKHARIN 469 

Why now dwell on the differences between us (per- 
haps possible ones), if it suffices to state (and prove) on 
behalf of the Central Committee as a whole: 

(1) proletarian culture = communism 

(2) is carried out by the R.C.P. 

(3) the proletar. -class = R.C. P. = Soviet power. 
We are all agreed on this, aren't we? 

Written on October 11, 1920 

First published in 1958 Printed from the original 

in Voprosy Istorii KPSS No. 1 



716 

TO A. M. HELLER 

Comrade Heller, 

Obtain for me without fail Treves's speech, quoted here 
(pagina 3). 470 

Collect all the material and translate the gist in order 
to prove every proposition of the Turin programme. 
To prove it. 

Greetings, 

Lenin 



Written between October 11 
and November 4, 1920 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



446 



V. I. LENIN 



717 

TO V. D. BONCH-BRUYEVICH 

12. X. 1920 

Comrade Bonch-Bruyevich, 

Please ask the appropriate institutions and authorities 
to provide housing (warm) and dinners for Comrade 
Teodorovich and his family, who have arrived from 
Siberia. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



First published in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the original 



718 

PROPOSAL TO THE POLITICAL BUREAU OF THE C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) ON THE SITUATION IN ARMENIA 471 

I propose that the Politbureau endorse all three of Chi- 
cherin's proposals. 

Lenin 

Written on October 
12 or 13, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 54 



719 

TO N. N. KRESTINSKY 



172 



Krestinsky 

I propose that Manuilsky should be compelled to see the 
best doctors (send them to him) for diagnosis and serious 
treatment. 

Lenin 



Written in 1920, 
after October 12 

First published in 1933 
in Lenin Miscellany XXIII 



Printed from the original 



TO G. M. KRZHIZHANOVSKY. OCTOBER 14, 1920 447 



720 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE POLITICAL BUREAU 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 473 

Members of the Politbureau 

I think we should agree with the Commander-in-Chief, 
adding: until the armistice becomes an actual fact. 

Lenin 

13/X. 

Written on October 13, 1920 

First published in 1961 Printed from the original 

in the book: Iz istorii 
grazhdanskoi voiny v SSSR, 
Vol. 3 



721 

TO G. M. KRZHIZHANOVSKY 

14/X. 

Gleb Maximilianovich, 

I am sending Nikolayev's reply. 

Tomorrow Botin should arrive and I will send him to 
you. 

In view of Nikolayev's doubts and suspicions, things 
with Botin should be put on a precise and formal basis: 
i.e., either you say, "it is not worth trying". Then we shall 
put an end to it all. Or you say, "it is worth while trying 
again". Then Botin is delegated to you and you give him 
an exact assignment, place him in exact working conditions, 
under exact control. (Cannot he be made to write in detail, 
in great detail, about the Tiflis experiment?) 

Yours, 

Lenin 

Written on October 14, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



448 



V. I. LENIN 



722 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE CENTRAL COMMITTEE 
OF THE C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 474 

Members of the C.C.: 

I emphatically disagree with this project. Changing 
names is a harmful game. 

In fulfilment of the decision of the Ninth Congress (I 
enclose the text of the decision), it is necessary, in my opin- 
ion, to set up a permanent inter -departmental commission 
of the Council of Labour and Defence, under my chairman- 
ship (if the comrades do not object). That is quite suffi- 
cient. 

Lenin 

15/X. 

Please return to me with indications as to who has 
read it. 

Lenin 

15/X. 

Written on October 15, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 

723 

TO E. M. SKLYANSKY 475 

Comrade Sklyansky, 

Give the Revolutionary Military Council of the Republic 
an instruction or, rather, a definite order to achieve rapid 
and complete liquidation. Let me know what measures have 
been taken. 

Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 

15/X. 



Written on October 15, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



TO PRINTING AND PUBLISHING DEPARTMENT OF THE S.E.C. 449 



724 



TO THE STAFF OF THE CEMENT WORKS 
AT SHCHUROVO STATION 



16. X. 1920 



Cement Works 
Shchurovo Station 

I congratulate the workers and other employees of the 
works that has been put into operation. I hope that by 
energetic work you will succeed in restoring and surpassing 
the former output. I ask the Works Committee and the Com- 
munist cell to send me, after a month or two, a report on 
the progress of the work. 



TO THE PRINTING AND PUBLISHING DEPARTMENT 
OF THE SUPREME ECONOMIC COUNCIL 

Copy to the Pravda Printing- Press* 

Please inform me how you account for such bad printing 
of Pravda as No. 231 for 16/X, enclosed herewith. Since 
I shall be raising this question in the Council of People's 
Commissars, I ask you to supply me urgently with informa- 
tion as to what measures you are taking and what guaran- 
tees there are for an improvement of the present position. 



Lenin 

Chairman, Council of Defence 



First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the original 



725 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 



Written on October 16, 1920 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from the typewritten 
text, added to and signed 
by Lenin 



This line is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



450 



V. I. LENIN 



726 

TO S. P. SEREDA 

Comrade Sereda, 

Please give me your comments. 476 

It is essential, as a matter of the greatest urgency, to 
prepare a plan for a tractor campaign. 

1) Purchase abroad 

2) Production in Russia 

3) Technicians — 
workers, etc. 

Be sure to let me know in a day or so, when you will 
present a preliminary memorandum. (Should not a con- 
ference be convened at once?) 

Lenin 

19/X. 

Written on October 19, 1920 

First published in 1959 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXVI 



727 

TO V. S. KORNEV 

Comrade Kornev, Commander of the Internal Security 

Troops of the Republic 

Copy to Comrade Dzerzhinsky 

Comrade Schlichter informs me of an increase of the re- 
volt in Tambov Gubernia, and the weakness of our forces, 
particularly the cavalry. 

Speediest (and exemplary) liquidation is absolutely es- 
sential.* 

Please inform me what measures are being taken. More 
energy should be displayed and greater forces assigned. 

VI. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

Written on October 19, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the typewritten 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV copy 



See also this volume, Document 723. — Ed. 



TO A. M. LEZHAVA AND M. N. POKROVSKY. OCTOBER 21, 1920 451 



728 

F. E. DZERZHINSKY 

Urgent 

Comrade Dzerzhinsky 

Bandits have seized the Boldyrev (Rasskazovo) factories 
(Tambov Gubernia). 

It is an absolute scandal. 

I propose that the Chekists (and the Gubernia Executive 
Committee people) of Tambov Gubernia who were caught 
off their guard 

1) be court-martialled, 

2) that Kornev be severely reprimanded, 

3) that extremely energetic people be sent there at once, 

4) that a severe trimming and instructions be given by 
telegraph. 

Lenin 

Written in October, 
after 19, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

729 

TO A. M. LEZHAVA AND M. N. POKROVSKY 

Comrades Lezhava and M. N. Pokrovsky 

I insist that this matter be speeded up to the utmost and 
a draft decision be submitted to the C.P.C. on Tuesday 
(26.X): 

1) to decide on the sale of these articles abroad as quickly 
as possible; 

2) to require from the People's Commissariat for Educa- 
tion an official reply before Tuesday, 26/X, as to whether 
they have any objection (it is said they have already 
picked out articles for our museums: I agree to let them 
have only the strictly necessary minimum); 

3) to send abroad at once a special commission of experts + 
traders, promising them a good bonus for a speedy and 
profitable sale; 



452 



V. I. LENIN 



4) as I find the work excessively slow (8 out of 33*), I 
consider it absolutely necessary to increase the personnel of 
the commission of experts (Gorky suggests up to 200 persons) 
and to give them rations on condition that the work is com- 
pleted quickly. 477 

Lenin 

21/X. 

Written on October 21, 1920 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 

730 

TO N. P. BRYUKHANOV 

21. X. 1920 

Comrade Bryukhanov 

The Stavropol peasants (who have brought grain for the 
children) complain that they are not getting from the 
co-operatives 

wheel-grease (the stores have it), 

matches 

and other goods. 

The herrings were allowed to go bad, but they were not 
given out. 

There is terrible discontent. The Gubernia Food Commis- 
sar says: nothing will be given until the whole requisition 
quota is fulfilled. 

They insist on the need for goods to be issued immedi- 
ately. 

They say that the quota of 27 million poods is excessive, 
seed corn is being taken, and there is bound to be under- 
sowing. 

Stavropol Gubernia — average harvest (27). 
Kuban — better than Stavropol (37 million poods). 
Please examine it urgently, especially the first point, 
and give me your opinion not later than tomorrow. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



*See Note 358.— Ed. 



TO THE STATE PUBLISHERS. OCTOBER 21, 1920 



453 



Address: Kazan (railway station), goods station, truck 
No. 506955 on the Krivoi track, Petrov from the Gu- 
bernia Party Committee. 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



731 

TO THE NARROW COUNCIL 
OF PEOPLE'S COMMISSARS 478 

Please go into this matter as quickly as possible. It is 
evident from the enclosed that the instruction of the Food 
Commissariat (of the centre) puts these products at the 
disposal of the Commission for Improving Scientists' Liv- 
ing Conditions. Hence, without the consent of the centre, 
Petrograd has no right to requisition them or take them 
into account! 

Lenin 

21/X. 

Written on October 21, 1920 

First published in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



732 

TO THE STATE PUBLISHERS 479 

21/X.1920 

1) The first is amateurish. Klein is a good book, more 
are needed. 

2) The second (Brodsky). An unnecessary and untimely 
undertaking. 

A. I. Rykov has been informed of a number of the worst 
mistakes, etc. 

First published in part in 1945 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



454 



V. I. LENIN 



733 

TO G. V. CHICHERIN 480 

Comrade Chicherin, 

An official Note must certainly be sent on this and all 
similar cases. 

Circularise all representatives of the R.S.F.S.R. abroad 
to this effect. 

Lenin 

25/X. 

Written on October 25, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



734 

TELEPHONE MESSAGE TO A. M. LEZHAVA, 
F. F. SYROMOLOTOV AND S. M. FRANKFURT 

Comrades Lezhava 

Syromolotov 
Frankfurt 

Please make use of Comrade Frankfurt's presence in Mos- 
cow to arrange for a meeting to discuss the situation in 
the gold-mining industry in Siberia and measures for 
developing it. 

Please give me the conclusions of the meeting for refer- 
ring the matter to the Council of People's Commissars or 
deciding it by way of an agreement among the depart- 
ments, etc. 481 

Lenin 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

27/X. 



Written on October 27, 1920 

First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from the original 



TO CONTROL COMMISSION OF THE R.C.P.(B.). OCTOBER 27, 1920 455 



735 

TO THE VLADIMIR GUBERNIA 
PARTY COMMITTEE 482 

27. X. 1920 

Gubernia Party Committee 
Vladimir (gubernia centre) 

I certify that Comrades Ratnikov, Rybakov, Romanov 
and Glazunov visited me on 27. X. 1920 on behalf of the 
uyezd Party conference (Alexandrov Uyezd, Vladimir 
Gubernia) in regard to a case of flagrant Party and Soviet 
abuses. 

I consider their approach to me quite in order and called 
for by the circumstances of the case and ask to be informed 
what general procedure you have established for members 
of uyezd Party organisations to approach Moscow in 
general and the C.C., R.C.P. in particular. 

With communist greetings, 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 

First published in 1942 Printed from the original 

in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



736 

TO THE CONTROL COMMISSION 
OF THE R.C.P.(B.) 

Comrades Dzerzhinsky, Muranov, Preobrazhensky, and 
others 

I earnestly request you to receive personally Comrades 
Ratnikov, Rybakov, Romanov and Glazunov from the uyezd 
Party conference (Alexandrov Uyezd, Vladimir Gubernia) 
about a case of flagrant, exceedingly glaring abuses (So- 
viet and Party) at the Troitsk Equipment Works, and partic- 
ularly about the difficulties experienced by Party members 
in taking the case to the centre and getting it speedily 
examined if even through Party channels. Apparently — this 



456 



V. I. LENIN 



is my impression — there is something wrong in the Gubernia 
Party Committee as well. I enclose a copy of the decision 
of the Orgbureau. 



737 

TO A. I. RYKOV AND I. I. RADCHENKO 

28. X. 1920 

1) Comrade Rykov (or, if he has not yet recovered, Com- 
rade Milyutin) 

2) and Comrade I. I. Radchenko, Chief Peat Committee 
Copies to: 3) R. E. Klasson (to be found through 

Radchenko) 

4) Krzhizhanovsky, Chairman of the State Com- 
mission for the Electrification of Russia 



5) Sklyansky (§4) and Trotsky 

6) Lezhava and Lomonosov 

7) the Cinema Department 

8) Sosnovsky 

9) Shatunovsky (Chief Transport Commission). 



On 27. X. 1920, a film before a large Party audience 
showed the working of a new hydraulic pump (of 
engineer R. E. Klasson) which mechanises the extraction 
of peat, as compared with the old method. 

In this connection, an exchange of opinions took place 
between engineer Klasson, Comrades Radchenko and Moro- 
zov — representatives of the Chief Peat Committee, Comrade 
Shatunovsky (from the Chief Transport Commission), and 
myself. 

This exchange of opinions revealed that the heads of 
the Chief Peat Committee fully agree with the inventor 
on the great importance of this invention. In all the work 
for restoring the national economy of the R.S.F.S.R. and 
for the country's electrification, mechanisation of peat 



With communist greetings, 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 



Written on October 27, 1920 

First published in 1942 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXIV 



Printed from 
the typewritten text 
signed by Lenin 



TO A. I. RYKOV AND I. I. RADCHENKO. OCTOBER 28, 1920 457 



extraction makes it possible to go ahead immeasurably more 
rapidly and firmly and on a broader front. It is therefore 
essential immediately to take a number of measures on 
a national scale to develop this work. 

Please discuss this question immediately and give me 
without delay your comments (corrections, additions, coun- 
ter-plans, and so on) on the following proposals arising from 
yesterday's preliminary exchange of opinions. 

1. To regard work on applying the hydraulic method of 
peat extraction as of prime state importance and therefore 
especially urgent-To pass a decision to this effect through 
the Council of People's Commissars on Saturday, 30/X. 

2. To instruct all chief committees (and other bodies), 
on whose support the successful work of the Commission (or 
committee?) for Hydraulic Peat Extraction (under the Chief 
Peat Committee) mainly depends, to delegate their represen- 
tatives (preferably Communists or, in any case, people 
known to be conscientious and particularly energetic) to take 
a permanent part in this commission. To make them respon- 
sible, in particular, for the speediest fulfilment, without any 
procrastination, of the orders and requests of this commis- 
sion. To give the Council of People's Commissars the 
names and addresses of these representatives. 

3. The same in regard to some of the most important fac- 
tories involved. List of these factories to be drawn up. 

4. To instruct the Naval Department to have its own 
representative on the commission, one fully acquainted with 
the stocks of materials and technical facilities of this depart- 
ment. 

5. To issue Red Army rations to the group of people on 
whose work the rapid and complete success of the matter 
directly depends, increasing at the same time their remune- 
ration so as to enable them to devote themselves wholly 
and completely to their work. To instruct the Commis- 
sion for Hydraulic Peat Extraction to send immediately 
to the People's Commissariat for Food and the All-Russia 
Central Council of Trade Unions a list (exact) of these peo- 
ple, indicating standards of remuneration, bonuses, etc. 

6. To discuss immediately with the People's Commis- 
sariat for Foreign Trade what orders should be placed at 
once with Swedish and German factories (perhaps engaging 



458 



V. I. LENIN 



there one or several prominent chemists) so that by the sum- 
mer of 1921 we can receive what is necessary for the speed- 
iest and widest application of the hydraulic method. In 
particular, to make use of Comrade Lomonosov who is due 
to leave for Sweden and Germany within the next few days. 

7. To instruct the Cinema Department (of the People's 
Commissariat for Education?) to arrange for the film of 
the hydraulic method to be shown on a wide scale (partic- 
ularly in Petrograd, Ivanovo-Voznesensk, Moscow and 
peat- extraction localities) with the simultaneous reading, 
without fail, of a brief and popular leaflet (ask Comrade 
Sosnovsky to edit it) explaining the gigantic importance of 
mechanising peat extraction and of electrification. 

8. I fix the first report of the Commission for the Hydrau- 
lic Method of Peat Extraction to the Council of People's 
Commissars for 30. X. 1920. 483 



P.S. Comrade Rykov, should not the question be raised 
of using more of the materials and technical facilities of the 
Naval Department for the needs of the production of the 
means of production? Why should we want new battle- 
ships and the like? Aren't they out of place just now? Sha- 
tunovsky (take notice of him, he is a devoted and valuable 
man; a worker, studied mathematics abroad) says (according 
to Sosnovsky) that in the Naval Department Trotsky discov- 
ered something like a million poods of first-grade steel (for 
battleships) and took it for the Chief Transport Commission. 
Check this, think it over, perhaps we shall put it before 
the Council of Defence or the Council of People's Commis- 
sars. 



V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 



Yours, 



Lenin 



First published in part in 1925 
in the book: G. Boltyansky, 
Lenin i kino, Moscow-Leningrad 



Published in part (without the 
postscript) in 1934 in the book: 



Printed from the original; 
the postscript — from the 
text in Glyasser's hand- 
writing 



Lenin na khozyaistvennom 
fronte. Sbornik vospominanii, 



Moscow 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



TO P. I. POPOV. OCTOBER 30, 1920 



459 



738 

TELEGRAM TO M. V. FRUNZE 484 

In code 
28. X. 1920 

Frunze, Commander of the Southern Front 
Copy to Trotsky 

In reply to your No. 001/nin. I am indignant at your 
optimistic tone, when you yourself report that there is only 
one chance in a hundred that the main task, set long ago, will 
be successful. If things are so outrageously bad, I ask you 
to discuss measures of the utmost urgency for bringing up 
heavy artillery, for constructing lines for its transport, for 
getting sappers, and so on. 

Lenin 

First published in 1941 Printed from the original 

in the book: M. V. Frunze 
na frontakh grazhdanskoi voiny. 
Sbornik dokumentov 



739 

TO P. I. POPOV 485 

1) The number of Soviet office workers. 

2) By separate People's Commissariats. 

3) If possible — by departments. 

4) If possible — according to the main categories (experts, 
service personnel, clerical staff, etc.). 

5) Other information (sex, etc.) depending on the kind 
of information in the questionnaire. 

Please divide the work into two parts: 

1) The briefest information (number, etc.). 
Not more than 4 weeks. 

2) Detailed information — how many weeks? 

3) The most detailed — how many weeks? 

V. Lenin 

30/X. 1920 



First published in 1945 
in Lenin Miscellany XXXV 



Printed from 
the typewritten copy 



460 



V. I. LENIN 



740 

TO S. I. BOTIN 

Comrade Botin, 

Please keep a record of all experiments 

1) strength of the current or electrical energy, 

2) where (how many sazhens off), and in accordance with 
the plan, the cartridges are placed, in front of the obsta- 
cle and behind it, 

3) on the ground, above, below, underground (depth), 

4) which ones and when were detonated, 

5) the record to be signed by all three, and to be kept 
by you for handing over to me. 

For each experiment a separate entry (day, hour, etc.). 



Yours, 

Lenin 

Written in October 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



741 

INSTRUCTION 
ON N. A. SEMASHKO'S TELEPHONE MESSAGE 

At its sitting on October 4, the Council of People's Commissars 
decided to ask the Revolutionary Military Council of the Western 
Front to vacate the university premises in Smolensk, and direct the 
Revolutionary Military Council of the Republic to enforce this de- 
cision by telegraph. In pursuance of the decision of the Council of 
People's Commissars, Comrade Sklyansky transmitted this instruc- 
tion to the Revolutionary Military Council for fulfilment. Never- 
theless, up to now the university premises have not been vacated by 
the Western Front Headquarters. In view of the extreme need of the 
university (of a special faculty) for premises, I am submitting a com- 
plaint to you on account of the non-fulfilment of the decision of the 
Council of People's Commissars and ask for categorical orders to be 
issued to the Revolutionary Military Council of the Western Front. 



Semashko 
People's Commissar for Health 



TO A. Z. GOLTSMAN. NOVEMBER 3, 1920 



461 



Comrade Sklyansky 

Carry out without delay. Report on fulfilment and I 
will take up the question of non-compliance and punish- 
ment in the Narrow Council. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, C.P.C. 

2/XI. 

Written on November 2, 1920 

First published in 1965 Printed from the original 

in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 

742 

TO A. Z. GOLTSMAN 

Urgent. Personal 
3/XI.1920. 21. 25 hours 

Comrade Goltsman 
Copy to Eismont 

Copy to the Chief Clothing Board 

The Chief Clothing Board should submit for consideration 
by the Bonus Awards Commission the question of bonuses 
for the production of 20,000 pairs of hunting boots. 

The question is of tremendous importance for our victory 
in the south, and it is most important that the boots be made 
quickly. I request you to look into this urgently, and to 
take steps to ensure that the boots are actually made in the 
time demanded by the Commander-in-Chief, Comrade Ka- 
menev. 

V. Ulyanov (Lenin) 
Chairman, Council of Labour and Defence 

P.S. I direct Comrade Sklyansky to control the fulfil- 
ment.* 

Lenin 



First published in part in 1961 
in the book: Leninskiye idei zhivut 
i pobezhdayut. Sbornik statei 
(Lenin's Ideas Live and Triumph. 
A Collection of Articles) 

Published in full in 1965 
in Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51 



Printed from the typewrit- 
ten text, 
added to and signed 
by Lenin 



* The postscript is in Lenin's handwriting. — Ed. 



NOTES 



465 



Lenin's instruction was written on an order to the Red Guard 
Staff issued by the Military Revolutionary Committee of the 
Petrograd Soviet. The order gave instructions for petrol, four 
artillery batteries, three motorcars, field telephones and cyclists 
or motorcyclists to be dispatched to the Pulkovo headquarters 
at positions near Tsarskoye Selo. 

The order called for the dispatch of petrol, a motorcar, two 
artillery batteries, sappers for trench-digging, motorcycle or 
bicycle messengers and maps of the locality, to the Staff of the 
Izmailovo Regiment on the main road to Moscow. The Military 
Revolutionary Committee proposed also that "a joint staff for 
the operation as a whole" should be set up and food supplies 
organised for the Red Guard. p. 43 

2 This refers to a resolution of the Petrograd Committee of the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) on the question of setting up a "homogeneous 
socialist government" of representatives from various parties and 
organisations "from the Bolsheviks to the Popular Socialists". 
The demand for such a government came from the Mensheviks 
and Socialist-Revolutionaries, who counted on playing the lead- 
ing role in it. Their proposal had the support of some of the 
members of the C.C. of the R.S.D.L.P.(B.)— L. B. Kamenev, 
G. Y. Zinoviev, A. I. Rykov and their few adherents. The C.C. 
of the Bolshevik Party at a sitting held on November 2 (15), 1917, 
strongly condemned the Right-opportunist, conciliatory attitude 
of the capitulators (see present edition, Vol. 26, pp. 277-79). 
Apparently, this note of Lenin's was written during the sitting 
of the Central Committee. 

The note was read out at a sitting of the Petrograd Committee 
of the Party. In a resolution on the current situation, the Petro- 
grad Committee stated that the government in the proletarian 
republic had to be a government of the Soviets of Workers', Sol- 
diers' and Peasants' Deputies, that the task of Soviet power was 
to put into effect the revolutionary programme advanced by the 
Bolsheviks, and that any departure from it was impermissible. 
This resolution was sent to the Party Central Committee. 

On November 3 (16), the Central Committee presented an 
ultimatum to the opposition minority demanding complete subor- 



466 



NOTES 



dination to the decisions of the Central Committee (see present 
edition, Vol. 26, pp. 280-82). The conciliators, however, refused 
to submit to Party discipline, and resigned from the Central Com- 
mittee and the Council of People's Commissars. The Central 
Committee branded them as saboteurs (see present edition, Vol. 26, 
pp. 302-03). New people, loyal to the cause of the Party, were 
brought into the government. p. 43 

3 The letter to Y. M. Sverdlov apparently concerns F. F. Obraztsov, 
who had been received by Lenin as the representative from the 
peasants of four volosts of Tver Gubernia. 

At the top of the letter, Lenin wrote the words: "First floor, 
room 39." This was the room in Smolny where Y. M. Sverdlov 
worked after his election on November 8 (21), 1917, as Chairman 
of the All-Russia Central Executive Committee. p. 44 

4 Lenin wrote this letter because the representative of the Interna- 
tional Association for Information of the Labour Press of America, 
France and Great Britain, the Rumanian journalist Nicolae Cocea, 
at that time in Petrograd, had requested him on behalf of the 
Association to reply to the following six questions: "1) Will the 
Government of People's Commissars continue with the same vigour 
its former home policy and its international efforts on behalf 
of peace? 2) What great reforms are being planned by the present 
government for establishing a socialist system in Russia? 3) After 
the Constituent Assembly is convened will the Government of 
People's Commissars be responsible to it as in constitutional 
states, or not? 4) Do you think that the peace Russia proposes 
will put an end to militarism throughout the world? 5) When and 
how do you intend to begin demobilising the Russians? 6) Do you 
think that with the present state of Europe the complete realisa- 
tion of socialism is possible?" 

In a letter in reply to Lenin, Nicolae Cocea assured him that 
his conditions in regard to the publication of his replies would 
be fully observed. Lenin wrote on Cocea's letter: "Reply given 
10/XI. 1917." Lenin's replies to the questions put to him have 
not been found. 

The document published here was discovered in Rumania. 
In 1960 the Central Committee of the Rumanian Workers' Party 
presented it to the Central Committee of the C.P.S.U. p. 44 

5 On November 22 (December 5), 1917, the Council of People's 
Commissars adopted a decree on courts of law, which was pub- 
lished the following day in the newspaper Pravda. On November 24 
(December 7), in connection with this decree, the question of 
courts of law was discussed at a meeting of the Petrograd Soviet 
of Workers' and Soldiers' Deputies. The Soviet passed a resolu- 
tion approving the decree and indicated practical measures for 
its implementation. The district Soviets were instructed to im- 
mediately begin the election of local judges. p. 45 

6 Mensheviks — an opportunist trend among Russian Social-Demo- 
crats, one of the varieties of international opportunism. It was 



NOTES 



467 



formed at the Second Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. (in 1903) out 
of the opponents of the Leninist Iskra. At this Congress the elec- 
tion of the Party's central bodies resulted in Lenin's support- 
ers winning a majority (the Russian word for majority is bolshin- 
stvo) and they were therefore called Bolsheviks, while the opportu- 
nists were left in the minority (in Russian menshinstvo) and were 
given the name Mensheviks. 

The Mensheviks came out against the Party's revolutionary 
programme. They were opposed to the hegemony of the proletariat 
in the revolution, and the alliance of the working class and the 
peasantry, and were in favour of an agreement with the liberal 
bourgeoisie. 

After the defeat of the 1905-07 revolution the Mensheviks 
wanted to liquidate the illegal proletarian revolutionary party. 
In January 1912, the Sixth All-Russia Party Conference expelled 
the Menshevik liquidators from the R.S.D.L.P. 

In 1917 representatives of the Mensheviks entered the bourgeois 
Provisional Government, and after the victory of the Great October 
Socialist Revolution the Mensheviks together with the other 
counter-revolutionary parties waged a struggle against Soviet 
power. p. 47 

Lenin's name was put on the list of candidates to the Constituent 
Assembly from the Central Committee of the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) by 
five electoral areas: Petrograd — the capital, Petrograd Gubernia, 
Ufa, the Baltic Fleet and the Northern Front. In addition, Lenin 
was nominated as the candidate to the Constituent Assembly 
from Moscow. The elections to the Constituent Assembly were 
held on November 12 (25), 1917. On November 27 (December 10) 
the All-Russia Committee for Elections to the Constituent Assem- 
bly requested members of the Constituent Assembly who had been 
returned by several areas to present a written statement indicat- 
ing the area for which they accepted election. Having been elect- 
ed by several areas, Lenin, too, presented such a statement. (See 
also Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, Document 23.) p. 48 

In November and December 1917, counter-revolutionary elements 
in Petrograd organised the looting of liquor stores and shops. 

A state of siege was declared in Petrograd. A committee to 
combat looting was set up under the Petrograd Soviet. G. I. Bla- 
gonravov was appointed Military Commissar Extraordinary of 
Petrograd to combat drunkenness and looting. 

On December 5-6 (18-19), a counter-revolutionary organisa- 
tion led by Constitutional-Democrats and Black-Hundred ele- 
ments, which aimed at overthrowing Soviet rule and restoring 
the monarchy, was discovered. It allocated large sums of money 
for looting and provocations as one of the means of struggle, organ- 
ised gangs and issued special leaflets. p. 48 

In December 1917, V. A. Antonov-Ovseyenko left for the Ukraine 
to assume command of the Soviet troops fighting against Kale- 
din's forces. p. 49 



468 



NOTES 



10 In his memorandum addressed to Lenin, A. S. Solovyov drew 
attention to the Ukhta oilfields and asked that an order be is- 
sued to have them inspected and exploited. He enclosed with the 
memo a detailed description of the qualities of the Ukhta oil 
based on analyses of it. 

Today, the Ukhta district (Komi A.S.S.R.) has a well- 
developed oil industry, with enterprises for oil extraction and 
processing. p. 50 

11 P. A. Kozmin was then Deputy Chairman of the Special Defence 
Council. In his recollections entitled V. I. Lenin i spetsialisty 
(V. I. Lenin and the Experts), Kozmin quoted Lenin's note and 
wrote that after the discussion of the question raised in it "the 
commission of saboteurs was removed". p. 51 

12 On his arrival in Petrograd in December 1917, the French so- 
cialist Charles Dumas asked Lenin to receive him, mentioning 
that they were already acquainted. Lenin and Krupskaya 
met Charles Dumas in Paris, where they lived from December 
1908 to June 10 (23), 1912. 

During the First World War (1914-18), Dumas held social- 
chauvinist views, for which Lenin sharply criticised him in his 
work The Collapse of the Second International (see present edi- 
tion, Vol. 21, pp. 209-10). p. 51 

13 On December 12 (25), 1917, the First All-Ukraine Congress of 
Soviets held in Kharkov proclaimed the Ukraine a Soviet Re- 
public and elected the All-Ukraine Central Executive Committee 
of Soviets. In a telegram to the Council of People's Commissars 
on December 13 (26), the Ukrainian Central Executive Committee 
proclaimed the unity of interests of the peoples of the Ukraine 
and Soviet Russia. On December 16 (29), the Council of People's 
Commissars sent a telegram in reply, greeting the formation of 
"truly popular Soviet rule in the Ukraine" and promising "the 
now government of the fraternal republic full support in every 
way in the struggle for peace and also in the transfer of all land, 
factories and banks to the working people of the Ukraine". 

On December 19, 1917 (January 1, 1918), the C.P.C. appoint- 
ed G. K. Orjonikidze Acting Commissar Extraordinary of the 
Ukraine for co-ordinating the activities of Soviet organisations 
functioning in the Ukraine. p. 52 

14 Kuzmin and Reizon reported provocatory acts by the Ukrainian 
Central Rada and the counter-revolutionary command of the 
Rumanian Front aimed at demoralising and disarming the 8th 
Army. 

The Ukrainian Central Rada — a counter-revolutionary bour- 
geois-nationalist organisation. After the victory of the October 
Revolution it proclaimed itself the supreme organ of the "Ukra- 
inian People's Republic" and began an open struggle against 
Soviet power. 

At the First All-Ukraine Congress of Soviets held in Kharkov 
in December 1917, the Ukraine was proclaimed a Soviet Repub- 



NOTES 



469 



lie. The Congress declared the power of the Central Rada over- 
thrown. The Council of People's Commissars of the R.S.F.S.R. 
recognised the Ukrainian Soviet Government as the sole legiti- 
mate government of the Ukraine. In January 1918, Soviet troops 
in the Ukraine launched an offensive and on January 26 (Febru- 
ary 8) seized Kiev and deposed the bourgeois Rada. 

The Central Rada, routed and driven from the territory of 
the Soviet Ukraine, and having no support among the working 
masses, allied itself with the German imperialists in order to 
overthrow Soviet power and restore the bourgeois regime in the 
Ukraine. During the peace negotiations between the Soviet Re- 
public and Germany, the Rada sent its delegation to Brest-Li- 
tovsk and behind the back of the Soviet delegation concluded a 
separate peace with Germany, by which it undertook to supply 
Germany with Ukrainian grain, coal and raw materials in return 
for military assistance in the struggle against Soviet power. In 
March 1918 the Rada returned to Kiev with the Austrian and 
German invaders and became their puppet. At the end of April 
the interventionists dismissed the Rada, realising that it was 
incapable of suppressing the revolutionary movement in the Uk- 
raine and ensuring delivery of the required food supplies. p. 53 

On January 5 (18), 1918, the Constituent Assembly convened by 
the Soviet Government opened in the Taurida Palace in Petro- 
grad. After the counter-revolutionary majority of the Constituent 
Assembly had refused to recognise the Soviet Government and 
its decrees, and had rejected the Declaration of Rights of the 
Working and Exploited People proposed by the All-Russia Central 
Executive Committee, the Bolshevik group led by Lenin walked 
out. Late the same night the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries also 
walked out. There remained in the hall only the Constitutional- 
Democrats, Right Socialist-Revolutionaries and Mensheviks. 

By the decree of the All-Russia Central Executive Committee 
of January 6 (19) the bourgeois Constituent Assembly was dis- 
solved, p. 54 

A. I. Shingaryov and F. F. Kokoshkin, former ministers in the 
bourgeois Provisional Government, were arrested after the October 
Revolution and confined in the Peter and Paul Fortress, whence, 
owing to the state of their health, they were transferred to 
the Mariinskaya hospital. On the night of January 6 (19), 1918, 
they were killed by sailors, among whom were anarchists and 
criminal elements, who broke into the hospital. 

On Lenin's instructions, an investigating commission was 
immediately appointed. Those guilty of the murder were arrest- 
ed and tried. p. 54 

This refers to some sailors of the Second Guards Naval Depot, 
who illegally arrested three officers. Under the influence of coun- 
ter-revolutionary agitation, these sailors defied the laws of the 
Soviet Government, went on drinking bouts, and carried out 
illegal searches and arrests. They were disarmed and arrested. 



470 



NOTES 



The other, better, part of the men went to the Southern Front, 
where together with the Red Army units they fought heroically 
against the interventionists and whiteguards. p. 55 

18 This document and the note to the secretary which follows it 
were written by Lenin in connection with a memorandum re- 
ceived from the Food and Economic Committee of the Territorial 
Soviet of Western Siberia and the Urals, which reported that the 
Omsk railway was sabotaging the dispatch of food consignments 
to the west, as a result of which over a thousand loaded trucks 
remained stationary. The committee requested the appointment 
of an emergency commission of investigation. This memorandum 
was delivered by delegates from Urals factories, who had arrived 
with a train-load of grain. p. 55 

19 At the time of the Communist Party's efforts to extricate Soviet 
Russia from the imperialist war K. Radek's standpoint was that 
of the "Left Communists". p. 57 

20 The Tribunists — members of the Social-Democratic Party of Hol- 
land whose press organ was the newspaper De Tribune. They 
constituted the Left wing of the labour movement in Holland and 
during the imperialist world war (1914-18) their stand was, in 
the main, internationalist. In 1918 the Tribunists founded the 
Communist Party of Holland. p. 58 

21 The same day, in accordance with Lenin's directive, orders were 
issued for money to be given to Luteraan to travel to Russia and 
join the ranks of the Red Guard. p. 58 

22 On January 16 (29), 1918, Soviet troops liberated the town of 
Cherkassy and Bakhmach railway junction, and mounted a suc- 
cessful offensive against Kiev, where the main forces of the Ukrain- 
ian Centra Rada were concentrated. p. 59 

23 This refers to the reports in the Swedish bourgeois press concern- 
ing the revolution that had started in Finland. 

On January 27 (new style), 1918, the bourgeois government 
of Svinhufvud was overthrown and power passed into the hands 
of the workers. On January 29, a Finnish revolutionary govern- 
ment was set up — the Council of People's Representatives — 
which included E. Gylling, 0. Kuusinen, Y. Sirola, A. Taimi 
and others. But the proletarian revolution was victorious only 
in southern Finland. The Svinhufvud government, entrenched 
in the north, appealed to the government of imperial Germany 
for assistance. Owing to the intervention of the German armed 
forces, the workers' revolution in Finland was crushed on May 2, 
1918, after a bitter civil war which lasted for three months. A per- 
iod of white terror set in in Finland and thousands of revolu- 
tionary workers and peasants were executed or tortured to death 
in the prisons. p. 60 

24 This document is the reply to a telegram from Arthur Henderson, 
who, on behalf of the British Labour Party, proposed to Lenin 



NOTES 



471 



that delegates should be sent from the Bolshevik Party to a con- 
ference in London of socialists of the Entente countries to be 
convened on February 20, 1918, with the aim of achieving a com- 
mon agreement on the problems of the war. p. 60 

25 On January 28 (February 10), 1918, at the Brest-Litovsk peace 
conference — contrary to Lenin's directive that a peace treaty 
should be signed if the Germans presented an ultimatum demand- 
ing it — Trotsky declared that the Soviet Government refused 
to sign a peace treaty on the terms put forward by Germany, 
but that it considered the war at an end and was demobilising 
the army. The same day, without informing the Central Committee 
of the R.C.P.(B.) and the Council of People's Commissars, Trot- 
sky sent to the Headquarters of the Supreme Commander-in-Chief 
what was tantamount to a provocative telegram instructing him 
to issue an order on the night of the same day ending the state 
of war with Germany and her allies and demobilising the 
Russian army. The telegram did not mention that the peace 
negotiations in Brest had been broken off, the inference from its 
text being that the conference had culminated in the conclusion 
of peace. In the early morning on January 29 (February 11), Su- 
preme Commander-in-Chief N. V. Krylenko, on the basis of Trot- 
sky's telegram, issued an order which announced that peace had 
been concluded and called for the cessation of military operations 
on all fronts and demobilisation of the army. It was in conse- 
quence of Krylenko's order that Lenin sent this telegram and 
the one following it. p. 60 

26 The First Russian Society of Communist Agricultural Workers 
was organised early in 1918 on the initiative of workers at the 
Obukhov Factory in Petrograd. Lenin greatly assisted in its organ- 
isation. In March 1918, members of the society with their fami- 
lies went to Kazakhstan, where they settled and were given land 
to cultivate. Civil war prevented the development of the Petro- 
grad workers' initiative. The communards failed to reap even 
their first harvest. Kulaks and White Cossacks attacked the com- 
mune and broke it up. p. 61 

27 The instruction was written by Lenin beneath the text of a tele- 
gram received from the Command of the Baltic Fleet. The 
telegram stated: "A Swedish steamer, a cruiser and a des- 
troyer flying the Swedish naval flag, arrived off the Oland 
Island, landed 15 Swedish marines, and by threatening to use 
their arms forced our communications personnel to retreat." 

Lenin simultaneously sent a telegram to the Finnish People's 
Government (see the document that follows). p. 63 

28 The revolutionary People's Government of Finland sent a protest 
to the Swedish Government in connection with the landing of 
their troops on the Aland Islands. Sweden shortly withdrew her 
troops from the islands. In mid-March 1918, German troops were 
landed there and were used by the German Government to fight 
against the Finnish revolution. p. 64 



472 



NOTES 



This refers to General Alexeyev's letter to the French Mission 
in Kiev, which was intercepted in Novokhopersk. It was published 
on February 19, 1918, in Izvestia No. 28. In the letter, General 
Alexeyev asked the French Mission for assistance in the struggle 
against the Soviet state, since his troops were sustaining heavy 
defeats and were forced to withdraw from the Don territory. In 
describing the situation in the Don and Kuban regions, Alexeyev 
had to admit that he had been mistaken in counting on the Cos- 
sacks. "The ideas of Bolshevism," he wrote, "have found support- 
ers among the broad mass of Cossacks." p. 65 

Lenin's inquiry was written in connection with the stock- 
taking of goods in warehouses which was being carried out by 
the Supreme Economic Council. In reply, Rykov informed Lenin 
that: 1) lists had been drawn up of goods in private, military, 
railway and other warehouses; 2) responsibility for guarding 
the stores lay with the organisations to which they belonged; 
goods were released from the warehouses on delivery orders 
issued by the appropriate central bodies (Central Committee of 
Textile Industry, Central Soap Board, etc.); 3) rationing and 
distribution by ration cards was being carried out by the town 
Food Committee through co-operative shops and private firms; 
4) there was very little of confiscated products. p. 67 

This note is a reply to the following request from V. N. Podbel- 
sky, Commissar for Posts and Telegraphs of Moscow and Mos- 
cow Region: "We have just been informed by telephone on behalf 
of Trotsky that Austria-Hungary is said to have declared its re- 
fusal to advance against Russia. Please contact Trotsky or one 
of the other People's Commissars immediately by telephone, 
check this information and let us know. The Soviet of Workers' 
Deputies is at present in session here and awaits verification of 
this report. At the same time obtain the latest news in general, 
but only authentic news, and inform us immediately. Please do 
this, comrade, it is very important for us." p. 67 

The Party Central Committee, at its meeting on February 22, 
1918, discussed the question of procuring from Britain and France 
arms and food necessary for the defence of the Soviet Republic 
against the advancing German troops. This was opposed by 
the "Left Communists", who regarded any agreement with the 
imperialists as impermissible in principle. 

Lenin could not attend the meeting and therefore sent his 
opinion to the Central Committee. 

The Party Central Committee adopted a resolution recognis- 
ing the need to use every means to arm and equip the Red Army, 
including that of obtaining armaments and equipment from gov- 
ernments of capitalist countries, while at the same time pur- 
suing a fully independent foreign policy. On the same day a sit- 
ting of the Council of People's Commissars also passed a decision 
in favour of obtaining arms and food supplies from Britain and 
France (see also present edition, Vol. 27, pp. 36-39). p. 67 



NOTES 



473 



33 



34 



35 



36 



On February 25, the Soviet delegation, which had left for Brest- 
Litovsk to sign the peace treaty, was delayed at Novoselye rail- 
way station, where a bridge had been blown up. Unable to get 
in touch directly with the German Government, the delegation 
wired the Council of People's Commissars requesting that the 
German Government be informed of the arrival of the delegation. 
Lenin's remark about possible waverings on the part of the dele- 
gation was apparently due to the fact that two of its members, 
G. Y. Sokolnikov and A. A. Joffe, had been refusing to join it, 
and had only set out after a decision of the Central Committee 
of the R.C.P.(B.). p. 68 

The Left Socialist-Revolutionaries — the Left wing of the petty- 
bourgeois Socialist-Revolutionary Party, which was organised as 
an independent party in November 1917. 

In an effort to maintain their influence among the peasants, 
the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries entered into an agreement with 
the Bolsheviks. They pledged themselves to carry out the general 
policy of the Soviet Government and were given posts in the Coun- 
cil of People's Commissars and on the boards of several People's 
Commissariats. 

But differences with the Bolsheviks on basic issues of the 
theory and practice of socialist construction soon made themselves 
felt. In January and February 1918, the Central Committee of 
the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party began a campaign against 
the conclusion of the Brest Peace Treaty with Germany. When 
the treaty had been signed and ratified by the Fourth Congress 
of Soviets in March 1918, the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries with- 
drew from the Council of People's Commissars. In July 1918 the 
Central Committee of the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries organised 
the provocative assassination of Mirbach, the German Ambassador 
in Moscow, and launched an armed revolt against Soviet power. 
Having lost all support among the masses, the Left Socialist-Re- 
volutionary Party finally took the path of armed struggle 
against Soviet rule. p. 68 

The Sovnarkom (Council of People's Commissars) of the Petrograd 
Labour Commune was set up by a decision of the Petrograd Soviet 
of Workers' and Soldiers' Deputies on March 11, 1918, owing to 
the Soviet Government being transferred from Petrograd to 
Moscow. 

At the end of April 1918, the Congress of Soviets of the North- 
ern Region established, for military and economic purposes, 
a Union of Communes of the Northern Region, which included 
also Petrograd Gubernia. On February 24, 1919, by a decision 
of the Third Congress of Soviets of the Northern Region, the Union 
of Communes of the Northern Region and the Sovnarkom which 
headed it, were abolished. p. 72 

This refers to the evacuation of industrial enterprises from Petro- 
grad. The question was raised in connection with the advance 
of the German troops on Petrograd. p. 72 



474 



NOTES 



37 The city Customs House was on Gutuyev Island in Petrograd. 
During April-June 1918, 1,180 truck-loads of various goods were 
evacuated from the Gutuyev Customs House. p. 72 

38 This refers to a resolution passed by the Central Executive Com- 
mittee of Siberian Soviets in connection with the landing of Japa- 
nese troops in Vladivostok on the morning of April 5, 1918. It 
protested against the illegitimate actions of the Japanese Gov- 
ernment; a state of war was declared in Siberia and all local 
Soviets were instructed to immediately step up the organisation 
of the Red Army. 

Centrosibir — the Central Executive Committee of Siberian 
Soviets; was elected by the First Congress of Siberian Soviets, 
held in Irkutsk from October 16 (29) to October 24 (November 6), 
1917. After the temporary downfall of Soviet power in Siberia 
(in the summer of 1918) Centrosibir ceased its activity. p. 75 

39 This refers to the Soviet Government's talks with representatives 
of the U.S.A., Britain and France in connection with the landing 
of Japanese troops in Vladivostok; the talks took place on the 
evening of April 5, 1918. 

The Soviet Government's communique on the landing of Japa- 
nese troops in Vladivostok, written on April 5 and published in 
Pravda and Izvestia on April 6, 1918, pointed out that resistance 
to the Japanese invasion and a relentless struggle against their 
agents and accomplices within the country was a matter of life 
and death for the Soviet Republic, for the working people of the 
whole of Russia. On April 7, 1918, Lenin sent a telegram with 
directives to the Vladivostok Soviet, warning that the interven- 
tionists were sure to advance and demanding that the Com- 
munists of the Far East without delay should start preparing 
to fight the foreign intervention (see present edition, Vol. 27, 
p. 226). ' p. 75 

40 N. N. Yakovlev, Chairman of the Central Executive Committee 
of Siberian Soviets, informed Lenin of the measures taken to organ- 
ise resistance to the Japanese interventionists in connection 
with the landing of their troops in Vladivostok. p. 75 

41 Lenin wrote this message on the instructions which engineer 
N. I. Dyrenkov, business manager of the Rybinsk Economic 
Council, received from the Supreme Economic Council. 

Dyrenkov came to Moscow to report to the Supreme Eco- 
nomic Council on the work of the Rybinsk Economic Council. This 
report on the economic situation in Rybinsk was made at a sitting 
of the Board of the Supreme Economic Council on April 15, 
1918; on a proposal by Lenin, it was decided to grant an immediate 
loan to Rybinsk. Lenin had a talk with Dyrenkov on the eco- 
nomic situation of the Soviet Republic, the state of industry in 
Rybinsk and the measures taken by the Rybinsk Economic Council. 

p. 77 

42 This refers to the draft Decree on the Registration of Shares, 



NOTES 



475 



Bonds and Other Interest-bearing Securities. The first two drafts 
were prepared by the Supreme Economic Council. After exam- 
ining them, Lenin crossed out the first draft, edited the second, 
and sent it to Bogolepov and Gukovsky at the People's Commis- 
sariat for Finance. The draft, after being revised in the People's 
Commissariat for Finance, was re-edited by Lenin, given a head- 
ing and, on April 17, 1918, submitted for consideration to the 
Council of People's Commissars. The following decision on the 
draft was adopted: "To be referred to the People's Commissariats 
for Foreign Affairs and Justice for their consideration with the 
assistance of experts, and the conclusion to be presented to the 
next sitting of the Council of People's Commissars on April 18." 
On April 18, the decree was endorsed by the Council of People's 
Commissars, and on April 20 it was published in Izvestia No. 78. 

p. 78 

I. Y. Yakovlev established the first Chuvash school in the city of 
Simbirsk (now Ulyanovsk), the birthplace of Lenin. He compiled 
the first Chuvash alphabet and primer, and did a great deal to- 
wards educating the Chuvash people. 

In reply to his inquiry Lenin received a telegram on May 4, 
1918, saying that Yakovlev continued as chairman of the courses 
and seminary for women. p. 79 

Lenin's letter was due to the following circumstance. On Janu- 
ary 4 (17), 1918, the Council of People's Commissars adopted a 
decree on the reorganisation of the Red Cross on the basis of the 
abolished Chief Board of the Red Cross that had existed under 
the tsarist government, making over its property and funds to 
the state. The work of reorganising the Red Cross was entrusted 
(§3 of Section 1 of the decree) to a committee of representatives 
of Soviet, military and public organisations. The committee was 
instructed to submit to the Council of People's Commissars 
through the Council of Medical Collegiums a plan for reorganising 
the Red Cross institutions. However, the committee failed to 
fulfil the tasks entrusted to it, and this was brought to the notice 
of Lenin by V. M. Bonch-Bruyevich, a member of the Red Cross 
committee. p. 79 

This refers to preparations for a monetary reform in order to es- 
tablish a stable Soviet currency and overcome the inflation caused 
by the war and the economic policy of the tsarist government 
and the bourgeois Provisional Government. Lenin raised the 
question of the need for a monetary reform in December 1917 in 
his "Draft Decree on the Nationalisation of the Banks and on 
Measures Necessary for Its Implementation" (see present edition, 
Vol. 26, p. 393). Preparations for the monetary reform were made 
under the direct guidance of Lenin. He urged more speed in 
preparing and issuing new, Soviet currency notes, and went into 
all details of the proposed designs. (See this volume, documents 
125 and 126, and also Lenin Miscellany XXI, p. 180.) 

Owing to the foreign military intervention and the Civil War, 
and the transition to the policy of War Communism, the mone- 



476 



NOTES 



tary reform was not carried out in that period. The first Soviet 
monetary reform on the basis of Lenin's principles was effected 
in 1922-24. p. 81 

This letter is a reply to Raymond Robins, a member of the Amer- 
ican Red Cross Mission. It was written in English. At the head 
of the letter, Lenin wrote: "Reply 30. IV. 1918." 

On the eve of his departure from Soviet Russia for the United 
States, R. Robins wrote to Lenin expressing sincere thanks for the 
assistance given him in his work for the American Red Cross 
Mission. 

A few days later, on May 11, 1918, Lenin wrote a letter ad- 
dressed "To All Soviets of Workers' and Soldiers' Deputies and 
Other Soviet Organisations", requesting them "to give every 
assistance to Colonel Robins and the other members of the Ame- 
rican Red Cross Mission for their unhindered and speedy journey 
from Moscow to Vladivostok". p. 82 

Lenin wrote this letter to P. P. Malinovsky, Acting People's 
Commissar for the Properties of the Republic, in connection with 
the implementation of the decree of the Council of People's Com- 
missars "On the Monuments of the Republic", adopted on April 
12, 1918, and published on April 14 in Pravda and Izvestia. The 
decree set the task of removing monuments to the tsars and their 
servants that were of no historical or artistic value, and of erect- 
ing revolutionary monuments. A special commission, consisting 
of the People's Commissar for Education, the People's Commissar 
for the Properties of the Republic and the head of the Fine Arts 
Department of the People's Commissariat for Education, was 
instructed to determine which monuments in Moscow and Petro- 
grad were to be removed, and advised to enlist the services of 
artists in designing new, revolutionary monuments. The Council 
of People's Commissars proposed that by May 1 the commission 
should have removed the ugliest monuments and submitted the 
first models of new monuments, and should also hasten arrange- 
ments for replacing old inscriptions, emblems and street names 
by new ones reflecting the ideas and sentiments of revolutionary 
Russia. 

Lenin attached great importance to the implementation of 
this decree, the progress of which was discussed at the sittings 
of the Council of People's Commissars on July 8, 17 and 30, 1918. 
Lenin repeatedly criticised the heads of the People's Commissar- 
iats for Education and for the Properties of the Republic, and 
the heads of the Moscow Soviet, for the unsatisfactory implemen- 
tation of the decree (see this volume, Document 109, and present 
edition, Vol. 35, documents 171 and 176, pp. 360, 368). p. 82 

This telegram is in reply to one from Ekaterinburg dated April 
30, 1918, from the Regional Board of Nationalised Enterprises, 
reporting that rumours were current about the denationalisation 
of the Bogoslovsk mining district. Lenin attached great impor- 
tance to the speedy exposure of these false rumours which could 



NOTES 



477 



mislead the working masses. On the telegram from Ekaterinburg, 
Lenin wrote the following note: "Received 2/V.1918 at 7 p.m. 
I demand investigation into the reason for two days' delay. 
Lenin." p. 83 

49 This memorandum was adopted at a meeting of Lenin and Bol- 
shevik members of the Board of the People's Commissariat for 
Agriculture in connection with the demand of Maria Spiridonova 
and V. A. Karelin, leaders of the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries, 
that the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries be given complete control 
of the People's Commissariat for Agriculture. This demand 
was put forward because of the appointment of more Bolsheviks 
(S. P. Sereda, V. N. Meshcheryakov, N. M. Petrovsky and others) 
to the Commissariat for Agriculture following the resignation 
of A. L. Kolegayev, as a result of which the position of the Left 
Socialist-Revolutionaries in the Commissariat was considerably 
weakened. 

Lenin wrote also the following draft decision of the meeting: 
"The preliminary meeting (on the questions raised by Comrades 
Spiridonova and Karelin) between members of the Board of Agri- 
culture, Comrades Sereda and Meshcheryakov, and Lenin has 
reached the conclusion that the questions raised should be exam- 
ined as serious political questions and therefore should certainly 
be referred to the C.C., R.C.P. 

"The meeting considers it essential to refer them to the C.C. 
urgently and speedily" (Lenin Miscellany XXXVI, p. 42). 

The situation in the People's Commissariat for Agriculture 
was discussed at a sitting of the C.C, R.C.P.(B.) on May 3, 1918. 
The Central Committee noted that the claims of the Left Social- 
ist-Revolutionaries were groundless and approved the decision 
of the meeting. p. 83 

50 This refers to the dismissal of the Central Rada by the German 
occupationists and the establishment in the Ukraine of an open 
dictatorship of the bourgeoisie and landowners. On April 29, 
1918, at a congress of kulaks and landowners in Kiev convened 
by the interventionists, General P. P. Skoropadsky, a big Ukrain- 
ian landowner and former aide-de-camp to the Tsar, was pro- 
claimed Hetman of the Ukraine. p. 84 

51 On May 6, 1918, German and whiteguard army units broke into 
Rostov-on-Don and occupied the city. On May 7, it was liberated 
by Soviet troops, but on May 8 it was re-occupied by German 
and whiteguard troops. p. 84 

5 Ino — a fort on the border with Finland which, with Kronstadt, 
guarded the approaches to Petrograd. Under a treaty between the 
R.S.F.S.R. and the Finnish Socialist Workers' Republic, Fort 
Ino was seceded to the R.S.F.S.R. for the defence of the joint 
interests of the Socialist Republics. After the defeat of the revo- 
lution in Finland, the Finnish bourgeois government with the 
support of the German imperialists demanded that Fort Ino be 
handed over to Finland. Before it was abandoned, the main works 



478 



NOTES 



of the fort were blown up by order of the Commandant of the 
Kronstadt fortress. In May 1918, Finnish troops occupied 
Fort Ino. p. 84 

53 An emergency meeting of the Party Central Committee on May 6, 
1918, discussed the international situation of the Soviet Republic 
in connection with the aggravation of relations with Germany, 
who demanded that Fort Ino be handed over to bourgeois Finland, 
and also in connection with the British occupation of Murmansk 
and the preparations by the interventionist troops to advance 
into the interior of the country. The Central Committee adopted 
the decision on the international situation proposed by Lenin 
(see present edition, Vol. 27, pp. 355 and 379-80). p. 84 

54 This note is a reply to A. D. Tsyurupa, who had informed Lenin 
that the food organisation of the Nikolayevskaya Railway had 
refused to allow A. I. Svidersky, member of the Board of the 
People's Commissariat for Food, to carry out an inspection agreed 
upon between the Food Commissariat, the Commissariat for 
Railways, and the Supreme Economic Council. Tsyurupa asked 
Lenin's advice as to what steps should be taken in this case. 

p. 85 

55 Lenin wrote this letter after a talk with the Chairman of the Pur- 
chasing Commission of the Putilov (now Kirov) Works, a plater 
in the boiler-shop, A. V. Ivanov, who gave a detailed descrip- 
tion of the grave state of famine in Petrograd and told of the 
situation at the works and the mood of the workers. 

Lenin informed Ivanov of the decree passed at the meeting 
of the Council of People's Commissars on May 9, 1918, giving 
the People's Commissar for Food emergency powers in the strug- 
gle against the rural bourgeoisie, who were concealing grain and 
profiteering. Lenin gave Ivanov a copy of the decree so that he 
could make it known to the Putilov workers. 

The meeting between A. V. Ivanov and Lenin is described 
in the book Vospominaniya o Vladimire Ilyiche Lenine (Reminis- 
cences of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin), Part 2, 1957, pp. 283-84. p. 86 

56 This refers to a meeting of the Russo-German Commission held 
in Moscow on May 15, 1918, to discuss the conditions for resuming 
economic relations between Russia and Germany. The report at 
the meeting was made by M. G. Bronsky, Deputy People's Com- 
missar for Trade and Industry. The main propositions in his 
report had been vetted by Lenin. p. 86 

57 In a plan for the development of trade and economic relations 
with the U.S.A. drafted on Lenin's initiative, the Soviet Govern- 
ment expressed its readiness to pay for goods purchased in the 
U.S.A. with agricultural produce and products of the mining 
industry, and also to offer concessions to the U.S.A. on the same 
terms as to other countries. 

The plan, under the heading "Russo-American Trade Rela- 
tions", was first published in June 1918 in No. 1 of Vestnik Narod- 



NOTES 



479 



nogo Komissariata torgovli i promyshlennosti (Herald of the Peo- 
ple's Commissariat for Trade and Industry). In the U.S.A., the 
plan was published together with Lenin's letter to Raymond 
Robins in the book Russian-American Relations. March 1917- 
March 1920, New York, 1920. p. 87 

This note to G. V. Chicherin was written following the receipt 
of a report that troops of the Transcaucasian bourgeois govern- 
ment, supported by a flotilla of armed merchant vessels, were 
advancing on Sukhum, creating a threat to the entire Black Sea 
coast. In the draft of a telegram submitted to Lenin, which was 
addressed to Sablin, Chief of the Naval Forces of the Black Sea 
Fleet, the latter was instructed to arm a number of Soviet merchant 
ships and send them for the defence of Sukhum. 

On May 20, 1918, the Soviet Government sent a Note to the 
German Government protesting against the German military 
authorities conniving at the actions of the armed merchant ships 
of "the so-called Transcaucasian government, which is recogni- 
sed by absolutely nobody in Transcaucasia". p. 88 

This refers to a draft decree for reorganising the Food Commis- 
sariat and the local food bodies. At a meeting of the C.P.C. on 
May 20, 1918, A. D. Tsyurupa, on Lenin's instructions, moved 
that the draft decree be submitted for discussion. The draft was 
discussed at meetings of the C.P.C. on May 22 and 23, and was 
adopted with amendments. It was decided to refer the decree 
to the All-Russia Central Executive Committee, where it was 
endorsed on May 27. It was published in Izvestia No. 109 on May 
31, 1918. 

Clause 3 of the decree envisaged the establishment under the 
local food commissariats of special detachments of workers recom- 
mended by Party and trade union organisations, formed mainly 
in the consuming districts. These detachments were to be at the 
disposal of the local food bodies and comply with their directives, 
and were to be employed in propaganda, organising and instruct- 
ors' work. "The most important task of the workers' detach- 
ments," states the decree, "should be to organise the working 
peasantry against the kulaks" (Dekrety Sovetskoi vlasti [Decrees 
of the Soviet Government], Vol. 11, 1959, p. 310). p. 89 

In the spring of 1918 the German interventionists occupied the 
Ukraine, invaded the Crimea and approached Sevastopol, where 
the Black Sea Fleet was concentrated. On April 29-30, to save 
the fleet from the invaders, the Soviet Government transferred it 
to Novorossiisk. Ten days after the fleet's arrival there, the Ger- 
man Command sent an ultimatum demanding its return to Seva- 
stopol, threatening otherwise to continue the offensive along the 
Black Sea coast. On May 11, the Soviet Government sent a "Pro- 
test to the German Government against the Occupation of the 
Crimea", stating the circumstances of the fleet's transfer and the 
possible conditions for its return to Sevastopol (see present edi- 
tion, Vol. 27, pp. 358-59). 



480 



NOTES 



All attempts to reach an agreement with the German Govern- 
ment on this question were abortive. Having no possibility of 
saving the fleet and to avoid surrendering it to the German 
imperialists, Lenin issued an order to the Supreme Military Coun- 
cil for its immediate destruction (see the next document). A secret 
instruction of the Council of People's Commissars ordered the 
destruction of all the ships of the Black Sea Fleet and merchant 
steamships in Novorossiisk. On June 18-19, 1918, the order of the 
government was carried out: most of the ships were sunk off the 
Novorossiisk coast. p. 91 

61 Arbeiterpolitik — a weekly periodical of scientific socialism, the 
organ of the Bremen group of Left Social-Democrats, which in 
1919 joined the Communist Party of Germany. It was published 
in Bremen from 1916 to 1919. 

Der Sozialdemokrat — a daily newspaper, the organ of the 
Independent Social-Democratic Party of Wiirttemberg. It was 
published in Stuttgart from 1915. In 1921, it became the organ 
of the United Communist Party of Wiirttemberg and was pub- 
lished under the title Kommunist. p. 92 

62 Lenin probably has in mind the letter he sent to S. G. Shahumyan 
on May 14, 1918 (see present edition, Vol. 35, Document 145). 

Lenin's letter of May 24 was delivered to Baku by S. M. Ter- 
Gabrielyan, one of the leaders of the Baku Commune. p. 93 

63 This document was drawn up in the People's Commissariat for 
Food. At the top of the document, separated by a line, is the 
following inscription: "Telegram of the People's Commissariat 
for Food." p. 93 

64 This refers to a decision of the Council of People's Commissars 
on May 8, 1918, to take stock of all available automobiles and 
lorries and transfer all surplus lorries to the People's Commissar- 
iat for Food. p. 97 

65 Lenin sent this telegram to the Vyksa workers in reply to one 
received from them which stated that they were "absolutely 
starving", and were going out by steamboats with their detach- 
ments and machine-guns in order to obtain grain by force, p. 97 

66 This letter was written in English during a conversation with 
Albert Rhys Williams, the American journalist, who visited 
Lenin before leaving for the U.S.A. p. 97 

67 Sokolnikov, Bukharin and Larin went to Berlin as members of 
the Soviet delegation to negotiate an economic agreement with 
Germany. p. 98 

68 Evidently this refers to Lenin's letter of June 2, 1918, to J . A. Ber- 
zin or G. L. Shklovsky (see Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, 
Document 165). p. 99 

69 Lenin's notes to A. D. Tsyurupa were written in connection with 
the need to explain to the mass of the working people the deci- 



NOTES 



481 



sion on independent procurements adopted by the Council of 
People's Commissars on June 1, 1918. The decision pointed out 
that independent grain procurements, for which the Council of 
People's Commissars was being asked by representatives of some 
organisations and trade unions, could disrupt the whole business 
of food supply, clear the way for the kulaks and landowners, and 
ruin the revolution. The decision set the task of organising food 
detachments, selecting for them the best and most devoted people 
from among the workers and office personnel "in order to form 
a general working-class fighting force for establishing order, for 
assisting with supervision, for collecting all grain surpluses, for 
complete victory over speculators" (Dekrety Sovetskoi vlasti, 
Vol. II, pp. 379-81). 

On this subject see also present edition, Vol. 27, pp. 416-17. 

p. 100 

After the capture of Omsk by Czech and Russian whiteguards 
on June 7, 1918, a Siberian whiteguard puppet government was 
set up there with the assistance of the interventionists. It consist- 
ed in the main of Socialist-Revolutionaries, with Mensheviks 
and Constitutional-Democrats participating. Behind a screen of 
democratic phrases it pursued a counter-revolutionary policy, 
paving the way for the transition to an open military dictatorship 
of the bourgeoisie and landowners. 

G. Y. Zinoviev's inquiry concerned the purchase of grain 
in Omsk for Petrograd. p. 103 

This refers to the decree "On the Monuments of the Republic", 
adopted at a sitting of the Council of People's Commissars on 
April 12, 1918 (see this volume, Document 75 and Note 47). 

p. 105 

This refers to the capture of Syzran by units of the Czecho- 
slovak Army Corps. 

This Corps was formed in Russia before the October Revolu- 
tion from among Czechs and Slovaks who were taken prisoner 
as soldiers of the Austro-Hungarian army. By the agreement of 
March 26, 1918, the Soviet Government gave the Corps the oppor- 
tunity of leaving Russia via Vladivostok on condition that it 
surrender its weapons and remove its Russian commanders. 
But on the orders and with the support of the imperialists of 
the U.S.A., Britain and France, the counter-revolutionary com- 
manders of the Corps engineered an armed revolt by the Corps 
against the Soviet government at the end of May. Acting 
in close contact with the whiteguards and kulaks, the White 
Czechoslovak Corps occupied a considerable part of the Urals, 
the Volga area and Siberia. 

In the districts occupied by the Czechoslovak mutineers, 
whiteguard governments were formed with the participation of 
the Mensheviks and Socialist-Revolutionaries. 

Many soldiers in the Corps, seeing how they had been betrayed 
by their counter-revolutionary command, refused to fight against 



482 



NOTES 



Soviet Russia and deserted from the Corps. About 12,000 Czechs 
and Slovaks fought in the ranks of the Red Army. 

The Volga area was liberated by the Red Army in the au- 
tumn of 1918. The White Czechoslovak Corps was completely 
routed simultaneously with the wiping out of Kolchak's forces. 

p. 106 

73 Lenin is referring to the following writings: the pamphlet by 
Rosa Luxemburg — Junius, Die Krise der Sozialdemokratie; the 
pamphlet circulated in Germany in manuscript form: Klassen- 
kampf gegen den Kriegl Material zum "Fall" Liebknecht (Class 
Struggle Against the War. Material to Liebknecht's "Case"); 
cuttings from the newspaper Berner Tagwacht, organ of the Social- 
Democratic Party of Switzerland. p. 107 

74 The article by the German Left Social-Democrat 0. Riihle, "Zur 
Parteispaltung" (On the Split in the Party), was published on 
January 12, 1916, in No. 11 of Vorwarts, the central organ of the 
German Social-Democratic Party. p. 107 

75 Referenten-Material aus Niederbarnim' a (Niederbarnim — suburb of 
Berlin) was quoted in Legien's pamphlet entitled Warum mus- 
sen die Gewerkschaftsfunktionare sich mehr am inneren Parteileben 
beteiligen? (Why Must Trade Union Functionaries Take More 
Part in the Party's Internal Affairs?). p. 107 

76 This refers to the German Government's demand for the ships 
of the Black Sea Fleet to be transferred from Novorossiisk to 
Sevastopol. See this volume, Document 88 and Note 60. p. 107 

77 The Decree on the Nationalisation of the Oil Industry was adopt- 
ed by the Council of People's Commissars on June 20, 1918. 

p. 107 

78 K. A. Mekhonoshin, a member of the Revolutionary Military 
Council of the Eastern Front, asked by direct line for informa- 
tion concerning the situation resulting from the revolt of the 
Left Socialist-Revolutionaries in Moscow on July 6, 1918. He 
asked to be informed what stand the Left Socialist-Revolutionary 
A. L. Kolegayev had taken. Mekhonoshin also reported that 
M. A. Muravyov, a Left Socialist-Revolutionary in command of 
the troops of the Eastern Front, had proclaimed his loyalty to 
Soviet power and stated that he renounced his membership 
of the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party because that party 
opposed Soviet power. 

However, Muravyov made this statement in order to conceal 
his own treacherous activity. On receiving a telegram from the 
Central Committee of the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party 
alleging that the Left S.R.s had succeeded in seizing power in 
Moscow, he went over to the insurgents. According to their plan, 
Muravyov was to make the troops on the Eastern Front take up arms 
against Soviet power and, after joining forces with the white 
Czechs, to march on Moscow. On July 10, on arriving at Simbirsk, 



NOTES 



483 



79 



Muravyov announced that he did not recognise the Brest peace 
and declared war on Germany. 

The Soviet Government took urgent measures to liquidate 
Muravyov's adventure. A government statement of July 11 de- 
clared him a traitor and enemy of Soviet power. On the evening 
of July 11, Muravyov was invited to a sitting of the Simbirsk 
Executive Committee. When Muravyov's traitorous telegrams on 
the cessation of military operations against the interventionists 
and whiteguards were read out at the sitting, the Communists 
demanded his arrest. Muravyov offered resistance and was killed, 
and his accomplices were arrested. p. 114 

The notes to I. E. Gukovsky refer to preparations for the issue 
of new Soviet currency. See also this volume, Document 71 and 
Note 45. p. 115 

80 This evidently refers to the fact that at a meeting convened by 
the Saratov Committee of the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party 
in connection with the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries' revolt in 
Moscow, a decision was adopted condemning the actions of the C.C. 
of the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries tending to undermine Soviet 
power. The Saratov combat squad of Left Socialist-Revolutiona- 
ries at their meeting denounced the treachery of the Left Social- 
ist-Revolutionaries in Moscow and declared that they stood by 
the platform of defence of Soviet power. 

On receipt of a report from Saratov on the decisions adopted 
by the meeting of the Left Socialist-Revolutionaries, Lenin sent 
it to Pravda with the following introductory words: "Commissar 
Ivanov, travelling to the Caucasus, reports from Saratov." It was 
published in Pravda with this introduction. p. 117 

81 This was written in connection with a letter sent to the Naval 
Board by the Bureau of Supply of the North Caucasian Military 
District, requesting urgently to dispatch to the Caspian Sea and 
river Kura 8-10 motor vessels, which were to be put at the dispos- 
al of the Baku Council of People's Commissars. The letter speci- 
fied the types of vessels, which were to be equipped with ordnance 
and machine-guns, and also with spare parts for the engines, p. 117 

82 In reply to Lenin's inquiry, Podvoisky, a member of the Sup- 
reme Military Council, reported that the units which were to be 
sent from Kursk to the Eastern Front were still being raised and 
that a brigade of three regiments with three batteries would be 
entrained on July 23. p. 118 

83 Podvoisky had proposed taking upon himself the leadership in 
suppressing the Czechoslovak revolt and counter-revolutionary 
actions in the Volga area and the Urals. p. 119 

84 Later, in reply to an inquiry from Lydia Fotieva about this letter 
of Lenin's, Larin informed her: "The letter from Vladimir Ilyich 
which you sent (concerning the drafting of a pamphlet about the 
Supreme Economic Council) was never received by me. Perhaps 



484 



NOTES 



it relates to the time when (in 1918) I was sent to Berlin to con- 
duct negotiations with the Germans, and was to be handed to me 
on my return. At any rate, soon after returning I received a letter 
from Vladimir Ilyich on a similar subject, only broader in con- 
tent — to write about the Soviet Republic in general, not merely 
about the Supreme Economic Council (the letter has not been 
found. — Ed.), so as to acquaint people abroad and our own popu- 
lation with what had been achieved in one year. To this end, Vla- 
dimir Ilyich later wrote an order to all government departments 
to give me all the information I needed (see Lenin Miscellany XXI, 
p. 139. — Ed.). But the material sent in by the departments was 
far from satisfactory and we had to abandon the thought of 
compiling such a factual report of the government for the first 
year of our rule, the idea of which had apparently dismissed from 
Vladimir Ilyich's mind the proposal for a pamphlet about the 
Supreme Economic Council alone." 

Connected with Lenin's instructions mentioned by Larin in 
his letter to Fotieva is the decision drafted by Lenin and adopted 
by the Council of People's Commissars on August 29, 1918, call- 
ing for written reports to be submitted by the People's Commis- 
sariats on their work since October 25 (November 7), 1917, and 
Lenin's letter to the People's Commissars on this question (see 
present edition, Vol. 36, p. 493; Vol. 35, Document 168). p. 121 

On July 31, 1918, the Entente interventionists landed troops in 
Onega and seized the town. p. 123 

This refers to the following decrees of the Council of People's 
Commissars drafted on the basis of Lenin's "Theses on the Food 
Question" written on August 2, 1918 (see present edition, Vol. 
28, pp. 45-47): "On Drawing Workers' Organisations into Grain 
Procurement" (in Lenin's letter it is called a decree on collective 
trains) and "On Harvesting and Harvesting-Requisitioning Detach- 
ments". The decrees were adopted at the sittings of the Council 
of People's Commissars on August 3 and 4, 1918, and published 
in Izvestia on August 6. 

Clause 7 of the decree "On Drawing Workers' Organisations 
into Grain Procurement", mentioned lower down in the document, 
states: "Detachments setting out to procure grain are obliged to 
assist the local population in bringing in the harvest." p. 125 

After the capture of Archangel by the Entente troops on August 2, 
1918, a group of functionaries of the Archangel Gubernia Execu- 
tive Committee went to Vologda to report to M. S. Kedrov on 
the situation on the Northern Dvina. In Vologda, they learned of 
L. D. Trotsky's order, which demanded that the functionaries 
who had left Archangel should be regarded as deserters and tried 
by the Supreme Revolutionary Tribunal. The group of Communists, 
outraged by this order, since they were not directly to blame for 
the fall of Archangel, sent a request to Lenin and Sverdlov to be 
allowed to come to Moscow and report the truth about the events. 
In reply, Lenin sent the telegram published here. p. 126 



NOTES 



485 



90 



91 



92 



Replying to the preceding note from Lenin, Tsyurupa wrote: 
"Hostages can be taken when there is a real force. But is there? 
It is doubtful." p. 127 

This telegram is the reply to a message by direct line from D. T. Pe- 
truchuk, representative of the Moscow Regional Commissariat 
for Military Affairs, who had been sent to Orsha to expedite the 
dispatch of Red Army units to the Eastern Front. Petruchuk re- 
ported demoralisation in a number of army units and poor work 
on the part of local Soviet bodies, and he asked to be allowed 
to use the direct line. p. 130 

The Institute of Marxism-Leninism of the Central Committee 
of the C.P.S.U. does not have the letter from Vorovsky, or its 
enclosures, or any other material that would make it possible 
to establish the precise nature of the abuses referred to. Since 
Lenin's letter was addressed to Sklyansky, member of the Board 
of the People's Commissariat for Military Affairs, it may be pre- 
sumed that the reference is to abuses in one of the military depart- 
ments, p. 131 

Malyshev, in his capacity of authorised agent of the Union of 
Communes of the Northern Region, headed the expedition along 
the Volga of mobile trading barges carrying goods for exchange 
against grain. Lenin's telegram was in reply to Malyshev's report 
on the successful purchase of grain. See also this volume, Docu- 
ment 384. p. 132 

Lenin sent this telegram in reply to A. Y. Minkin, Chairman 
of the Penza Gubernia Executive Committee, who asked whether 
it was necessary to comply with the order of A. I. Potyaev, 
People's Commissar for Finance of the Northern Region, to the 
Chief of the Stationery Office in Penza that the unloading of the 
Stationery Office's train should be held up, contrary to Lenin's 
order dated August 16, 1918. 

The Left Socialist-Revolutionaries' revolt in Chembar, an 
uyezd town in Penza Gubernia, mentioned in the telegram, 
broke out on the night of August 18. On August 20, the revolt 
was put down by a detachment of Lettish riflemen and Red Army 
men, who had arrived from Penza. p. 134 



93 



This refers to a proposal to reward the first units to enter Kazan 
and Simbirsk. p. 135 

94 Lenin lived at the house of Latukka in Vyborg from September 
17 (30) to October 7 (20), 1917, after the July events, when he 
went into hiding to avoid persecution by the bourgeois Provision- 
al Government. p. 136 



95 



The Poor Peasants' Committees were instituted by a decree of 
the All-Russia Central Executive Committee on June 11, 1918. 
They played a tremendous part in the struggle against the kulaks 
and in consolidating Soviet power in the countryside. They car- 



486 



NOTES 



ried out strict accounting and distribution of grain and agricultur- 
al implements. Already by the autumn of 1918 the Poor Peas- 
ants' Committees, which played a historic role in the social- 
ist revolution, had successfully solved the tasks entrusted to them. 
In this connection, and also in connection with the need "to com- 
plete Soviet construction by the creation of a uniform organisa- 
tion of Soviets throughout the territory of the Soviet Republic", 
the Extraordinary Sixth All-Russia Congress of Soviets, held 
in November 1918, proposed the re-election of all volost and vil- 
lage Soviets, putting direct responsibility for the conduct of the 
elections on the Poor Peasants' Committees. In accordance with the 
election instructions published by the All-Russia Central Execu- 
tive Committee on December 4, 1918, the Poor Peasants' Commit- 
tees were to wind up their activities after the election campaign 
and hand over all their funds and functions to the newly-elected 
Soviets. p. 137 

A. K. Paikes, authorised agent of the Food Commissariat, and 
Zorin, Political Commissar of the 4th Army, reported from Sara- 
tov on the bad situation in regard to supplies for the army units 
and asked that urgent measures be taken for the dispatch of uni- 
forms, equipment and ammunition. p. 139 

In a telegram to Lenin received on the night of August 21, 1918, 
S. S. Turlo, Deputy Chairman of the Penza Gubernia Party Com- 
mittee, A. M. Buzdes, member of the Gubernia Committee, and 
secretary F. V. Veselovskaya, reported on a meeting of the Guber- 
nia Committee called in connection with Lenin's telegram of Au- 
gust 19 (see this volume, Document 158). At the meeting, in reply 
to a decision of members of the Gubernia Committee to send a 
food official and 50 Lettish Red Army men to suppress the upris- 
ing of the kulaks and to confiscate their grain, A. Y. Minkin, 
Chairman of the Gubernia Executive Committee, declared that 
he refused to carry out the decision. p. 140 

Lenin's letter was due to the following circumstances. On Au- 
gust 24, 1918, in view of the grave food situation in the city, 
the Moscow Soviet passed a decision allowing the working people 
to bring into Moscow freely up to one-and-a-half poods of 
foodstuffs for their own personal consumption. On August 26, the 
Council of People's Commissars considered a draft decree on 
preferential conveyance of grain, the question of the decision of 
the Moscow Soviet being left open. 

While the question was under discussion, the decision of the 
Moscow Soviet allowing one-and-a-half poods as baggage could 
not but hinder the organisation of the campaign against the black- 
marketeering bag-men and the regulation of the work of the inter- 
cepting detachments. On August 29, L. I. Ruzer, member of the 
Board of the Food Commissariat, who was in charge of this work, 
asked the Board to relieve him of the work of combating bag- 
trading. Ruzer wrote in his statement that he could think of "no 
more wordings for a single order in response to inquiries from 



NOTES 



487 



99 



the local areas". Tsyurupa, who was also opposed to the "one- 
and-a-half poods system", added a postscript: "None of the Board 
members nor the Board as a whole can think of wordings that Ruzer, 
too, failed to find. Conclusion: the order of the Moscow Soviet 
should be rescinded on approximately the following lines: the 
C.P.C. is to adopt a decision at once and publish it; the decision 
is to indicate the date on which the order of the Moscow Soviet 
ceases to be effective — approximately September 15. A. Tsyurupa." 
(V. I. Lenin, Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 447.) 

At the top of Lenin's note, Tsyurupa wrote: "A reply to Ru- 
zer's statement with my postscript", and then the date: "29/VIII." 

By a decision of the C.P.C. dated September 5, 1918, the de- 
cision of the Moscow Soviet and a similar decision of the Petro- 
grad Soviet ceased to be effective on October 1, 1918. p. 145 

Lenin wrote this letter when he was ill after being seriously wound- 
ed on August 30, 1918, by the Socialist-Revolutionary terrorist, 
Fanny Kaplan. 

In spite of the doctors' orders, only a few days after being 
wounded, Lenin began to occupy himself with affairs of state. 
On September 16 the doctors allowed him to resume work. From 
September 23 to mid-October Lenin was recuperating at Gorki 
near Moscow. 

The letter mentions the harvesting of grain in Yelets Uyezd, 
Orel Gubernia. On this subject see also this volume, Document 182. 

The original bears the date "7. IX. 1918". But in the files of 
the Council of People's Commissars there is a copy of this letter 
on which in an unknown hand is written the date "6/IX" and 
the time of dispatch "21.10 hours" (Ts. G.A.O.R., USSR). 
Moreover, on the night of September 6, Tsyurupa informed Zino- 
viev in Petrograd: "today Vladimir Ilyich ... wrote a letter" (Pe- 
trogradskaya Pravda No. 194, September 7, 1918). This gives 
grounds for assuming that the letter was written on September 6, 
1918. p. 146 

100 Lenin's telegram was transmitted to Kazan at 6.54 a.m. on Sep- 
tember 10, 1918, and by 2 p.m. units of the Red Army had liberat- 
ed Kazan from the whiteguard and White Czech troops. 

For Lenin's greetings to the Red Army men on the capture 
of Kazan see present edition, Vol. 28, pp. 93, 100. p. 147 

101 Simbirsk was liberated on September 12, 1918, by units of the 
Iron Division led by G. D. Gai. p. 147 

102 Telegrams from the Poor Peasants' Committees of Yelets Uyezd, 
Orel Gubernia, were sent to Lenin in reply to his letter to Sereda, 
People's Commissar for Agriculture (see this volume, Document 
78). p. 148 

103 This letter to V. D. Bonch-Bruyevich was written in connection 
with the death on September 30, 1918, of his wife, V. M. Velich- 
kina-Bonch-Bruyevich, a member of the Board of the People's 
Commissariat for Health. p. 150 



488 



NOTES 



104 rpjjjg telegram was sent in connection with the proposal of Rifaat 
Pasha, the Turkish Ambassador in Germany, for the signing of a 
protocol regulating the military situation in the Caucasus. The 
draft protocol Rifaat Pasha put forward provided for the with- 
drawal of the Turkish troops from the Caucasus to the borders laid 
down by the Brest Treaty, but it lacked a clause directly trans- 
ferring to the Soviet authorities the territories evacuated by the 
Turks. 

The fears expressed in this telegram were justified. On October 
30, 1918, the Turkish Government signed the Mudross armistice 
with the Entente countries, which contained a special clause about 
Turkey agreeing to the occupation of Baku by the Entente powers. 
In November 1918, in accordance with this agreement, the Turks 
withdrew their troops from Baku and the city was occupied by 
the British. p. 151 

105 Krasin asked Lenin to sign a telegram to the Tsaritsyn Extraor- 
dinary Commission for them to set free N. Mukhin, an employee 
of the Chief Oil Committee, who had been arrested, and allow 
him to travel freely to Moscow. Krasin proposed sending a copy of 
the telegram to Stalin in Tsaritsyn. p. 151 

106 rpjjjg re f ers to the article "The Proletarian Revolution and the Re- 
negade Kautsky" (see present edition, Vol. 28, pp. 105-13). The 
article was published in Pravda on October 11, 1918. p. 151 

107 Lenin is alluding to the debts of the tsarist and bourgeois provi- 
sional governments to the imperialists of Britain, France, the 
U.S.A. and other countries. By a decree of the All-Russia Cen- 
tral Executive Committee dated January 21 (February 3), 1918, 
all foreign loans of the tsarist and Provisional governments were 
annulled. p. 152 

108 The Note to Woodrow Wilson, President of the U.S.A., was dis- 
patched on October 24, 1918 (see Dokumenty vneshnei politiki 
SSSR, Vol. I, 1957, pp. 531-39). p. 152 

109 M. M. Litvinov, Plenipotentiary of the R.S.F.S.R. in Great Bri- 
tain, was arrested by the British Government as a hostage for Bruce 
Lockhart, British Vise-Consul in Moscow, who was arrested on 
September 3, 1918, for counter-revolutionary activities against 
the Soviet Republic. In October 1918 Litvinov was exchanged for 
Lockhart and returned to Soviet Russia. p. 153 

110 On October 3, 1918, the newspaper La Feuille reported the publi- 
cation of the book La Russie socialiste, which had been compiled 
by Left Socialist-Revolutionaries. 

La Feuille — a daily newspaper published in Geneva from 1917 
to 1920. While not formally the organ of any particular party, 
its views were those of the Second International. p. 154 

111 Znamya Trudovoi Kommuny (Banner of the Labour Commune) 
— a newspaper, published originally, from July 26 to August 18, 



NOTES 



489 



1918, under the title Znamya Borby (Banner of Struggle) as the 
organ of a group of Left Socialist-Revolutionaries. Later, from 
August 21, it was the organ of the Party of Narodnik Communists, 
a break-away from the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party. The 
newspaper ceased publication in November 1918, when an extra- 
ordinary congress of the Party of Narodnik Communists passed 
a resolution dissolving the party and merging it with the 
R.C.P.(B.). 

Volga Truda (The Will of Labour) — a newspaper, the organ 
of the Party of Revolutionary Communism, which broke away 
from the Left Socialist-Revolutionary Party in September 1918. 
It appeared from September 14 to December 4, 1918. From Decem- 
ber 29, 1918, the daily newspaper was replaced by a periodical with 
the same title; it was published until October 1920, when the Par- 
ty of Revolutionary Communism merged with the R.C.P.(B.). p. 154 

112 This refers to the illegally published "Letters" of the Spartacus 
group; twelve such letters were issued between September 1916 
and October 1918. p. 154 

113 Martov's article "Marx and the Problem of Proletarian Dictator- 
ship" was published in Nos. 29 and 30 of the journal Sozialistische 
Auslandspotitik for July 18 and 25, 1918. p. 155 

114 What this refers to has not been established. p. 155 

115 This refers to the "Letter to a Joint Session of the All-Russia Cen- 
tral Executive Committee, the Moscow Soviet and Representa- 
tives of Factory Committees and Trade Unions, October 3, 1918" 
(see present edition, Vol. 28, pp. 101-04). The possibility of the 
Entente countries extending intervention against the Soviet Re- 
public was dealt with by Lenin in greater detail in his report at the 
joint session of the All-Russia Central Executive Committee, the 
Moscow Soviet, factory committees and trade unions on Octo- 
ber 22, 1918, and in the speech on the international situation at the 
Sixth Congress of Soviets on November 8, 1918 (ibid., pp. 114-27, 
151-64). p. 156 

116 This refers to the Nizhni-Novgorod Radio Laboratory, which was 
founded in 1918 by M. A. Bonch-Bruyevich and V. M. Leshchin- 
sky, and was one of the first scientific research institutes estab- 
lished after the October Revolution. Lenin took a personal interest 
in the work of the Radio Laboratory and gave it repeated support. 

p. 156 

117 The French translation of Lenin's The State and Revolution was 
first published in 1919 in Moscow. From 1921 onwards the book 
was repeatedly published in French in Paris. p. 158 

118 This refers to the "Regulations Concerning the Board for the Or- 
ganisation and Exploitation of an Experimental Factory for Ra- 
dium Extraction" adopted by the Supreme Economic Council and 
published in Izvestia on August 16, 1918. p. 159 



490 



NOTES 



119 Written on the letter of head of the Children's Homes Depart- 
ment of the People's Commissariat for Social Security A. I. Ulya- 
nova-Yelizarova to the Board of Properties of Moscow's People's 
Palaces asking for pillows, blankets and bed-linen needed for 
orphanages to be evacuated from Moscow to the grain-growing 
provinces because of the famine. 

Lenin's directive was carried out. p. 159 

120 On November 12, 1918, the Swiss Government, yielding to pres- 
sure from the Entente countries, expelled from Switzerland the 
staff of the Embassy of the R.S.F.S.R. headed by Berzin. p. 160 

121 Lenin attached great importance to the suppression of the white- 
guard-S.R. revolt in Izhevsk and the liberation of the town. At 
the beginning of November 1918, in a talk with S. I. Gusev, mem- 
ber of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 2nd Army, he 
expressed the hope that Izhevsk would be liberated by the first 
anniversary of the October Revolution, and asked that this mes- 
sage should be transmitted to the Red Army men. On November 
7, troops of the division commanded by V. M. Azin stormed and 
captured the town and the small arms factory. 

Lenin's telegram is in reply to the report on the liberation of 
Izhevsk received from the Eastern Front. It was read out to the Red 
Army men who took part in the liberation of the town. p. 161 

122 The books preserved from Lenin's library in Poronin as well as 
archive materials (the Cracow-Poronin archives) were handed 
over to the Soviet Union after Lenin's death. The first batch of 
materials was received in 1924, and some of the books belonging 
to Lenin in 1933. Twelve of Lenin's books kept in the Bydgoszcz 
library, were handed over to the Soviet Army in 1945 as a token 
of gratitude for the liberation of the town from the German occu- 
pationists. A large batch of materials from the Cracow-Poronin 
archives, discovered by archivists of the Polish People's Repub- 
lic, was received in 1951. A particularly large number of valua- 
ble documents were handed over to the Central Committee of the 
C.P.S.U. by the Polish United Workers' Party in 1954. Altogeth- 
er, in 1951 and 1954, over a thousand new documents were 
handed over to the U.S.S.R. from Poland. p. 162 

123 On November 22, 1918, the Procurement and Supplies Depart- 
ment of the People's Commissariat for Food informed the Fin- 
nish Communist Club: "...in view of the fact that the organisa- 
tions are only partially supplied at the present time, 6,000 poods 
of grain have been allocated to you from the stocks of the Food 
Commissariat. Enclosed herewith is a copy of Comrade Lenin's 
letter". {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 453.) p. 163 

124 This note is Lenin's reply to an inquiry asking his opinion about 
the proposal of the Manager of the Northern Regional Branch of 
the National (State) Bank to celebrate December 14 — the anniver- 
sary of the promulgation of the decree nationalising private banks. 

p. 163 



NOTES 



491 



125 ffais telegram was in response to a complaint Lenin received from 
N. P. Gorbunov, head of the Science and Technology Depart- 
ment of the Supreme Economic Council, that the Technical Com- 
mittee of the Economic Council of the Northern Area was hold- 
ing up fulfilment of orders from the Central Science and Technol- 
ogy Laboratory of the Military Department. At the top of the docu- 
ment received from Gorbunov, Lenin wrote an instruction to the 
secretary: "Phone Gorbunov and tell him to send today the exact 
documents concerning the half-month's delay and copies of papers 
from Amosov (head of the Technical Committee of the Economic 
Council of the Northern Area. — Ed.). Without the documents 
the complaint has no weight. Lenin." On the left-hand side there 
is an additional note: "Reprimand sent. Lenin." (Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, pp. 453-54.) 

See also the document that follows. p. 164 

126 Lenin wrote this directive to Chicherin in connection with a ra- 
dio-telegram from the German Government, which was set up on 
November 10, 1918, and consisted mainly of Right-wing Social- 
Democrats and Centrists. In its radio-telegram of November 21, 
1918, the German Government requested the Soviet Government 
to issue a statement about its recognition and the obligation "to 
refrain from exerting any influence on the German population 
for the purpose of forming a different government". 

Lenin's instructions were reflected in the Note to the German 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs dated November 25, 1918, which was 
signed by G. V. Chicherin (see Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR, 
Vol. I, 1957, pp. 576-77). p. 165 

127 Lenin wrote this instruction on a memo from the Department 
of Museums and Protection of Monuments of Art and Antiquity 
of the People's Commissariat for Education, sent to the Managing 
Department of the Council of People's Commissars on November 
26, 1918, asking that a number of premises of the Grand Palace 
in the Kremlin be allocated for the requirements of the state mu- 
seums. 

On December 12, 1918, the C.P.C. decreed "that measures 
be taken to use premises of the Grand Palace for a museum, in 
particular for presenting a historic picture of the life of the tsars". 
(Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 454.) p. 166 

128 Lenin's doubts about the correctness of the reports that most of 
the Councils of German soldiers in the Ukraine had adopted a Bol- 
shevik stand were fully justified. The All-Ukraine Congress of 
Councils of German Soldiers, held in Kiev on December 13, 1918, 
was influenced by German opportunists and did not adopt any po- 
litical resolution. The Congress decided to come to an agreement 
with Petlyura's bands and to surrender Kiev to them without a 
fight in exchange for the free passage of westward-bound German 
troop trains. p. 167 

129 This refers to the decree "On the Organisation of Supplies" adopt- 
ed by the Council of People's Commissars on November 21. 



492 



NOTES 



1918. Under this decree the co-operatives were assigned a consid- 
erable role in the organisation of supplies for the population. 

p. 168 

130 This refers to the decision of the Extraordinary Sixth All-Russia 
Congress of Soviets granting an amnesty to certain categories of 
prisoners, adopted on the proposal of the C.P.C. on November 6, 
1918 (see the collection Syezdy Sovetov RSFSR i avtonomnykh 
respublik RSFSR, Vol. I, 1959, pp. 89-90). p. 168 

131 Lenin wrote this telegram following a complaint received from 
I. V. Bogdanov, a member of the staff of the Unemployment In- 
surance Office in Borisoglebsk, concerning the arrest of his son 
who, on the grounds of his inexperience and poor health, refused 
to take part in the work of the Evacuation Commission to which 
he was assigned by the Commissariat for Agriculture. p. 169 

132 Lenin's note is a reply to Kamenev, who proposed abstaining for 
a period of two months from "forcing the pace in handing over 
the whole business of supply ... to the state". Kamenev wrote to 
Lenin: "Don't call it a concession, call it manoeuvring, and ad- 
mit that this is precisely the time to manoeuvre." p. 169 

133 This refers to a pamphlet containing the decree on revolutionary 
legality adopted by the Extraordinary Sixth All-Russia Congress 
of Soviets on November 8, 1918. In this decree the Congress called 
on "all citizens of the Republic, all bodies, all officials of the 
Soviet authorities, to strictly observe the laws of the R.S.F.S.R., 
and the decisions, regulations and instructions issued by the cen- 
tral authorities". All departures from the laws, caused by the con- 
ditions of the struggle against counter-revolution, were to be 
kept within strictly defined limits. The decree outlined measures 
for waging a determined fight against bureaucracy and red tape 
in Soviet offices. 

The pamphlet appeared in 1919 under the title Observe the 
Laws of the Soviet Republic! (see also Document 422 of this 
volume). p. 170 

134 This refers to materials concerning a gang of profiteers and bribe- 
takers, who had wormed their way into Soviet bodies in As- 
trakhan and disrupted the work of supplying the Soviet troops. 

p. 170 

135 This apparently refers to the operation of a squadron of ships of 
the Astrakhan-Caspian Naval Flotilla for landing troops at 
Staroterechnaya in the Kizlyar sector of the Caspian-Caucasian 
Front. p. 171 

136 Towards the end of November 1918 Kolchak's troops, possessing 
considerable superiority in strength, launched an offensive against 
the 3rd Army of the Eastern Front with the aim of uniting with 
the interventionist troops in the north. After heavy defensive 
battles, the 3rd Army was forced to abandon a considerable terri- 



NOTES 



493 



tory. The causes for the defeat were: poor supply of clothing, food 
and ammunition to the army units, lack of the necessary reserves, 
contamination of some army units by counter-revolutionary 
elements owing to the violation of the class principle in the forma- 
tion of units, shortcomings in the army leadership on the part of 
the commander, M. M. Lashevich, and the Revolutionary Military 
Council of the army. 

On this subject see also this volume, Document 242. p. 171 

137 The instruction to G. I. Petrovsky, People's Commissar for In- 
ternal Affairs, was written by Lenin on a telegram he received 
on December 16, 1918, from peasants of Budilovo village (Yaroslavl 
Gubernia) complaining against the Chairman of the local Poor Peas- 
ants' Committee who had confiscated grain from them although 
they had no surpluses. They asked protection of Lenin, as 
"head of the peasant government". p. 173 

138 Lenin's note to Sverdlov was written on a telegram from N. N. 
Kuzmin, Military Commissar of the 6th Army, who had reported 
that Left Socialist-Revolutionary agitation was being conducted 
among the troops of the Northern Front, as a result of which dis- 
cipline in some units was deteriorating. 

As regards Spiridonova, a leader of the Left Socialist-Revolu- 
tionary Party, Lenin's note probably refers to her speeches at out- 
door and indoor meetings, against Soviet power, against the Bol- 
sheviks. On February 24, 1919, the Moscow Revolutionary Tri- 
bunal examined the case of Maria Spiridonova, who was accused 
of counter-revolutionary agitation and slander against Soviet 
power. The charges against Spiridonova were proved at the trial, 
but in view of the "morbidly hysterical state of the accused", 
the tribunal decided "to isolate Maria Spiridonova from political 
and social activity for one year by confining her in a sanatorium 
and affording her an opportunity for healthy physical and mental 
labour" (Pravda No. 43, February 25, 1919). p. 173 

139 This refers to the transfer to the People's Commissariat for Food 
of warehouses of industrial and handicraft products, which 
were at the disposal of the All-Russia Extraordinary Com- 
mission (Vecheka). The transfer was to have been made 
in pursuance of the decree on the organisation of supplies 
for the population adopted by the Council of People's Commissars 
on November 21, 1918. On December 3, 1918, the Food Commis- 
sariat asked the Vecheka to turn over the warehouses to the Chief 
Board for Distribution of Products, but up to December 20 this 
request remained without reply. On December 20, the Food Com- 
missariat applied to the Council of Defence concerning this mat- 
ter, p. 173 

140 D. A. Bulatov wired Lenin on December 26, 1918: "Letter re- 
ceived. Directive will be carried out." In a telegram on December 
28, 1918, Bulatov reported that Teterin, a member of the Pervi- 
tino Poor Peasants' Committee, had been relieved of his post as 
being a former gendarme, but the other members of the commit- 



494 



NOTES 



tee had been left in their posts since the accusations against them 
were unproven. On December 31 Bulatov sent Lenin a detailed 
letter on this matter. p. 175 

141 Lenin's telegram is a reply to the following inquiry dated Decem- 
ber 25, 1918, from S. A. Bank, Chairman of the Vyshny Volochok 
Uyezd Economic Council: "By order of the Council of Defence 
stores of army property have been sealed, an inventory is being 
urgently compiled. Owing to the spread of typhus in the town and 
uyezd, which is assuming menacing proportions, the Board of the 
Uyezd Economic Council has given permission for hospital property 
to be issued to the public health department. We ask for your 
sanction in assuming this great responsibility." {Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 459.) p. 175 

142 Lenin wrote this telegram in connection with a complaint reaching 
him from P. I. Surkov, a former member of the Social-Democrat- 
ic group in the Third Duma, against the decision of the Extraor- 
dinary Commission of the town of Rodniki (Ivanovo-Voznesensk 
Gubernia) to confiscate his library. Surkov reported that while 
objecting to the transfer of the library to Rodniki, he agreed to 
hand over the books for teaching young people in his own village. 
Regarding Surkov's library, see also documents 228, 229 and 235 
in this volume. p. 175 

143 In his telegram to Lenin and to the Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the Republic dated December 26, 1918, Trotsky, com- 
menting on the apprehensions of Commander-in-Chief Vatsetis 
regarding fraternisation, wrote of its significance, particularly on 
the Northern Front, where there were American, British and French 
troops. At the same time, in order to put a stop to enemy agita- 
tion among Red Army men and to prevent the weakening of the 
fighting efficiency of the Red Army units, the telegram proposed 
that fraternisation should be carried out in an organised manner 
under the surveillance and control of responsible functionaries, 
primarily political commissars. p. 176 

144 As a result of the measures taken, the Vyazniki workers received 
six truck-loads of flour, two of which were for the Yuzhsk factory. 

p. 176 

145 See Note 142. p. 177 

146 The question of requisitioning Surkov's library was discussed on 
December 27, 1918, at an enlarged sitting of the Executive Com- 
mittee, the Extraordinary Commission and the Committee of the 
R.C.P.(B.) of the town of Rodniki. Its decision noted that "the books 
in Citizen Surkov's library, which are of social value, are shut away 
and unread at a time when there is an immense lack of books for 
the enlightenment of broad masses of workers and peasants", and 
that since a library was being formed in Rodniki "the requisi- 
tioned books will be of tremendous benefit as public property". In 
order to give Lenin fuller information on this question, the 



NOTES 



495 



meeting decided to send A. N. Prokofiev, secretary of the local 
Cheka, to see him. 

Lenin received Prokofiev and after a talk with him wrote his 
letter to the People's Commissariat for Education. p. 177 

147 In reply to Lenin's letter, V. Y. Bryusov, head of the Library 
Section of the People's Commissariat for Education, informed 
him on January 2, 1919, that A. N. Prokofiev had been received 
and heard out in the Library Section. Bryusov wrote that, accord- 
ing to existing rules, the requisitioning of libraries could be 
permitted only with the knowledge and consent of the People's 
Commissariat for Education, in order that, when requisitioning 
takes place, the interests of the state as a whole should be taken 
into account — primarily the requirements of the large state li- 
braries: the libraries of the Rumyantsev Museum (now the State 
Library of the U.S.S.R., named after Lenin), the Historical Mu- 
seum, the Socialist Academy, the universities, and others. In 
view of this Prokofiev was asked to submit an inventory of the re- 
quisitioned library. 

On receipt of Bryusov's memo, Lenin wrote a letter to Pro- 
kofiev (see this volume, Document 235). p. 171 

148 This refers to the publication by the People's Commissariat for 
Agriculture of Materials on the Land Reform of 1918. Issue VI — 
Alienation and Utilisation of Agricultural Inventory — appeared at 
the end of 1918. p. 178 

149 This evidently refers to the publication of leaflets and their 
distribution among the Entente troops and in localities captured 
by the interventionists and whiteguards. p. 178 

150 Written by Lenin on the back of a report sent him by V. I. Nevsky, 
People's Commissar for Railways, on the number of freight-loads 
of food sent to Petrograd from Moscow and on delays in the dis- 
patch of food freights to Petrograd from Nizhni-Novgorod, p. 179 

151 See Note 147. p. 180 

152 Surkov's library came under the control of the Rodniki Depart- 
ment of Education on January 10, 1919, some of the books being 
returned to the original owner. Lists of the books requisitioned or 
returned to Surkov were sent to Lenin and to the Library Section 
of the People's Commissariat for Education on February 3. p. 180 

153 Written by Lenin following a conversation with F. F. Obraztsov, 
a peasant from Vasyutino village, Lopatinsk Volost, Vesyegonsk 
Uyezd, Tver Gubernia, who had been sent to Lenin by village 
Communists to solicit help in building a village People's House 
to replace one that was destroyed by fire at the end of 1917. 

On January 18, 1919, after Obraztsov's return home, the lo- 
cal newspaper, Izvestia of the Vesyegonsk Soviet of Workers', 
Peasants' and Red Army Deputies, published an article about 
his reception by Lenin under the heading "A Visit to Comrade 



496 



NOTES 



Lenin". In it Obraztsov related that his talk with Lenin had dealt 
chiefly with the policy of the Communist Party and the Soviet Gov- 
ernment towards the poor and middle peasantry. In concluding the 
article, Obraztsov wrote: "Comrade peasants of Vesyegonsk Uyezd! 
Believe me who saw with my own eyes that there, at the top, our 
common cause is being administered not by officials or bureau- 
crats, but by our own, ordinary comrades, who rightly call them- 
selves the Workers' and Peasants' Government. Let us hearken 
to their voice. They are working for us and our children. Let us 
help them with all we can in their difficult work. Then we shall 
all the sooner see a golden age for us. Comrades! I hope that it is 
together with you all that I say loudly: 'Long live the leader of the 
proletariat and protector of the poor, our friend and brother 
Vladimir Ilyich Lenin!!!'" p. 182 

Lenin sent this telegram in reply to the following telegram he re- 
ceived from Gorkino station on January 4, 1919: "Lenin, C.P.C., 
Moscow. We office staff and workers of Gorkino station, Northern 
Railway, at a general meeting have found it necessary to ask 
you to allow us to send our delegates to you in order to express 
our urgent needs. Please notify us whether you agree to receive 
them, and when. Ryabinin, chairman of the general meeting, 
Nesterekhin, secretary" {Lenin Miscellany XXXV, p. 51). p. 182 

This telegram was sent in reply to an inquiry from the Ufa Revolu- 
tionary Committee to whom the Right Socialist-Revolutionaries 
had made a proposal to begin negotiations for joint action against 
Kolchak. 

The talks with the Ufa Right Socialist-Revolutionaries were 
held during January-February 1919 in Ufa and Moscow. 

At the end of February, the All-Russia Central Executive 
Committee adopted a resolution on the attitude towards the Right 
Socialist-Revolutionaries. In view of the positive results of the 
talks and the fact that on February 8, 1919, the party conference 
of the Right Socialist-Revolutionaries declared itself opposed to 
an armed struggle against Soviet power and to foreign intervention 
in Russia's affairs, the All-Russia Central Executive Committee 
passed a decision to give to the groups of Right Socialist-Revolu- 
tionaries which adopted this stand the right "to participate in 
Soviet work". (Izvestia No. 45, February 27, 1919.) p. 184 

On December 25, 1918, Kolchak's troops occupied Perm. Having 
examined the letter from the Urals Regional Party Committee on 
the causes of the reverses of the 3rd Army, the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
set up a Committee of Inquiry consisting of J. V. Stalin and 
F. E. Dzerzhinsky, which visited the 3rd Army early in January 
1919. 

Lenin's directive was written in connection with a letter from 
Stalin and Dzerzhinsky in which they reported on the opening 
of the investigation and pointed out that in order to prevent the 
rapid advance of the enemy, it was essential to send urgently three 
reliable regiments to reinforce the 3rd Army. 



NOTES 



497 



On this subject, see also this volume, Documents 219, 251 
and present edition, Vol. 28, p. 390. p. 185 

157 In reply to Lenin's telegram, Kornev, Chairman of the Ryazan 
Gubernia Executive Committee, reported that at a sitting of the 
Presidium of the Gubernia Executive Committee and the Presid- 
ium of the City Executive Committee on January 15, 1919, it 
had been decided to urgently organise a Department of Public 
Catering under the City Executive Committee which was to take 
charge of all Ryazan's dining-rooms and tea-rooms. p. 186 

158 This telegram was prompted by a telegram that Lenin received 
on January 12, 1919, at about 7 p.m., from four workers who com- 
plained that the Gavrilov Posad Extraordinary Commission had 
confiscated 16 poods of oats from them, and asked for orders to 
be given for their return. p. 187 

159 Lenin wrote this instruction to the secretary on a telegram to the 
Council of Defence from Pashkov, Chief of the Railway Militia 
of a district in Tula Gubernia, who reported on the progress of 
snow clearing on the railway, and gave factual data on the 
number of workers and carts engaged in this work. p. 187 

160 Lenin's directives to Tsyurupa were written on the memorandum 
of the Education Commissariat's Inter-Departmental Commission 
for the Purchase of Food for the Children of Moscow and Petro- 
grad. The memorandum outlined measures for the better food 
provision of the children, specifically, the organisation and hold- 
ing of a Starving Children's Week for obtaining produce in 
rural localities in exchange for commodities, and for delivery of 
this produce to the towns. p. 188 

161 The document referred to has not been found. p. 188 

162 Lenin's instruction to Trotsky was written on the text of a report 
from Stalin and Dzerzhinsky giving the reasons for the fall of 
Perm. The report stated that the three regiments intended as 
reinforcements for the 3rd Army had been reassigned to Nar- 
va. ' p. 189 

163 Lenin probably refers to a letter dated January 19, 1919, from 
M. K. Vladimirov, Military Commissar Extraordinary of the Rail- 
ways of the Southern Front, reporting the state of affairs on the 
railways under his control. Appended to the letter was the draft 
of an addendum to the decision of the Council of Defence dated 
December 22, 1918, on the question of combating snowdrifts, p. 189 

164 On January 18, 1919, the Council of People's Commissars adopted 
a decision on the fuel and food situation at state engineering 
works. This decision instructed the Commissariat for Food to fur- 
nish exact information on "how many trucks, and when and from 
what localities, had been ordered for state engineering works and 
textile mills" {Lenin Miscellany XXXIV, p. 94). p. 190 



498 



NOTES 



165 This refers to a proposed conference on the Princes Islands (Sea 
of Marmora) with the participation of representatives of all the 
governments existing on the territory of Russia to draw up meas- 
ures for ending the Civil War. The address to the parties to the 
conference was drafted by Woodrow Wilson, President of the 
United States. The imperialists started this talk about a conference 
in order to halt the advance of the Red Army and, in the event 
of the Soviet Government refusing to participate in the confer- 
ence, to put the blame on it for the continuation of hostilities. 
The Soviet Government unmasked the imperialists who were 
posing as "peace-makers"; on February 4, 1919, it issued a radio 
statement to the governments of Great Britain, France, Italy, the 
United States and Japan agreeing to participate in the conference, 
which it intended to use as an international platform to expose 
the interventionists. But no reply was forthcoming from the 
Entente imperialists. Denikin, Kolchak and other counter-revo- 
lutionary governments still hoped to crush the Soviet Republic 
by force of arms, and therefore refused to take part in the confe- 
rence, which was never held. p. 191 

166 Lenin's telegram followed receipt by him of a report from 
Schwartz, representative of the Council of Defence in Samara, 
about the arrest of A. M. Smirnov, a Right Socialist-Revolutionary 
and former mayor of the town under the White Czechs, who gave 
himself up to the Soviet authorities and declared his intention of 
working with "Soviet power" for the purpose of fighting against 
Kolchak. Schwartz reported that Smirnov put forward no condi- 
tions for his work in the future and was backed by a group of 
individuals from his camp who had decided to serve Soviet 
power. 

On the telegram from Samara, Lenin wrote the words: "For 
handy reference. Wired 27/1." p. 191 

167 On receipt of Lenin's note Sklyansky gave instructions to S. I. 
Aralov, member of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 
Republic, for an immediate investigation. On February 3, 1919, 
Aralov reported back that a member of the All-Russia Council 
of the Air Fleet had been sent by the Field Division for Aviation 
and Aeronautics to the Tsaritsyn Front to carry out an inspection. 

p. 192 

168 Lenin's note to Krasin, People's Commissar for Trade and 
Industry, was written in connection with a report by W. Jas- 
trzembski, a former leader of the Polish Socialist Party, who was 
then in Russia, on the results of his journey to Warsaw under- 
taken to explore the possibility of establishing trade and cultural 
relations between the Soviet Republic and Poland. Owing to the 
resistance of the Right-wing leaders of the Polish Socialist Party, 
his mission was unsuccessful. Despite this Lenin was in favour 
of continuing negotiations. p. 192 

169 Written on a telegram from the secretary of N. I. Podvoisky, 
Ukrainian People's Commissar for Military Affairs, stating that 



NOTES 



499 



Podvoisky's train had left Moscow for Kharkov. The telegram was 
sent to seven different addresses. p. 193 

170 Lenin gave this instruction to Sklyansky and Podbelsky, People's 
Commissar for Posts and Telegraphs, after receiving a telegram 
from the Chief of Communications of Trotsky's train. The telegram 
stated that this train had left Petrograd for Yamburg and was 
sent simultaneously to a large number of addresses. p. 193 

171 On February 6, 1919, Shlyapnikov reported to Lenin informa- 
tion he had received from Baku to the effect that the workers of 
Baku enterprises and the sailors were hostile towards the Brit- 
ish occupationists, that the ships, on which there were still Rus- 
sian sailors, were ready to go over to the side of the Soviets, and 
that the Baku workers would start an uprising to coincide with 
the Red Army attack. p. 193 

172 Lenin's instruction to Petrovsky was written on the text of a 
report on the situation in Kursk Gubernia presented by an official 
of the Military Inspection. The latter reported dissatisfaction 
among the working people of Kursk Gubernia caused by abuses 
on the part of local Soviet and Party functionaries, the poor 
organisation of agitation and propaganda in the countryside and 
the weakness of the Party organisations in the gubernia. p. 194 

173 Lenin was informed that the rumour about the eviction of Vera 
Zasulich and other revolutionaries was without foundation, p. 195 

174 Lenin's telegram followed a letter from M. M. Fedoseyev from 
the village of Azeyevo, Yelatma Uyezd, Tambov Gubernia. Fe- 
doseyev stated that in October 1918 his printing-press in the town 
of Yelatma was nationalised and now stood "in a shed, rusting 
away and idle", at a time when the uyezd town of Yelatma was 
without a printing-press and orders were being sent to towns in 
other uyezds. Fedoseyev wrote that he was "not a bourgeois", that 
for 27 years he had worked as a clerk, secretary, teacher, and 
book-keeper; that after buying on credit an old, broken-down 
printing-press, he had put it in order and had himself worked in 
the print-shop as proofreader and compositor. 

On Fedoseyev's letter Lenin wrote the words: "Wired 18.11", 
"/iZe away for handy reference". p. 195 

175 In reply to Lenin's telegram, P. Gorbunov, Chairman of the Yela- 
tma Uyezd Executive Committee, reported the same day that 
the E.C. intended to merge Fedoseyev's printing-press with an- 
other nationalised local printing-press (of Meshcheryakov), where 
both Fedoseyev and Meshcheryakov, as specialists, would be 
allowed to work. p. 195 

176 A telegram from Headquarters of the Eastern Front on Februa- 
ry 19, 1919, reported on talks with representatives of the Bashkir 
bourgeois-nationalist government for the cessation of this govern- 
ment's anti-Soviet activity and for the Bashkir troops fighting 



500 



NOTES 



alongside Red Army units against Kolchak. The opinion was ex- 
pressed in the telegram that if the Bashkir troops would immedi- 
ately go over to an offensive against Kolchak they should not be 
disarmed, but if they were to refuse to do so, then it was essential 
to disarm them. 

Joint operations by Bashkir units and the Red Army against 
whiteguard troops began at the end of February 1919, and a Bash- 
kir Revolutionary Committee was set up. On March 20, 1919, the 
Government of the R.S.F.S.R. signed an agreement with the Bash- 
kir Government setting up a Bashkir Autonomous Soviet Repub- 
lic, p. 196 

177 Written by Lenin on the title page of a copy of his pamphlet 
The Struggle for Grain (Moscow, 1918), which through the medium 
of A. P. Ramensky (a colleague of I. N. Ulyanov — Lenin's father) 
he presented to a delegation of teachers from Tver Gubernia. The 
delegation had come to Moscow to ask for help in the form of food 
for Tver teachers. 

Lenin's pamphlet contained the text of his report on combat- 
ing the famine delivered at a joint session of the All-Russia Cen- 
tral Executive Committee, the Moscow Soviet, and the trade uni- 
ons on June 4, 1918, and his reply to the debate on the report 
(see present edition, Vol. 27, pp. 419-43). p. 197 

178 Lenin's telegram is the reply to one dated February 26, 1919, 
from S. Y. Tsekhanovsky, Chairman of the Rudnya Executive 
Committee, Mikulino Volost, Orsha Uyezd, Mogilev Gubernia. 
Tsekhanovsky wrote that the Mikulino Communists had organised 
a central volost workers' co-operative for the purpose of "uniting 
workers and peasants on the basis of a communist system of trade, 
abolishing private trading and pillage, and reconstructing exist- 
ing kulak-dominated consumer co-operatives"; the Rules of this 
workers' co-operative had been examined in the Supreme Econom- 
ic Council. Reporting that leaders of the uyezd and gubernia 
organisations in Orsha and Mogilev were opposed to the activities 
of the Mikulino Communists, Tsekhanovsky asked permission to 
report to Lenin personally "on the state of affairs as the leader 
of communism and defender of the proletariat". p. 199 

179 Lenin's note to Maria Kostelovskaya was probably written at 
the C.P.C. meeting of February 27, 1919, which discussed the 
draft decree on workers' food detachments. The note was a reply 
to Kostelovskaya's proposal to postpone the discussion of this 
question. p. 199 

180 Written by Lenin on a note from A. I. Svidersky, member of the 
Board of the People's Commissariat for Food, apparently at a 
meeting of the Council of People's Commissars. Svidersky wrote 
that the Food Commissariat had been discussing whether to con- 
sider the frontier with the Ukraine open for free transport of all 
food products or only of those that were unrationed. 

The organisation of food supply in the liberated districts of 
the Ukraine at the beginning of 1919 was a very important mat- 



NOTES 



501 



ter. Lenin devoted great attention to this question; in particular, 
he proposed to hasten Schlichter's departure to the Ukraine, 
where he was to head the People's Commissariat for Food. On 
February 25, 1919, Lenin wrote on a telegram from Pyatakov, 
who reported on food stocks in the Ukraine: "Inform Schlichter, 
adding that I am extremely dissatisfied at the delay of his 
journey" (A. Schlichter, Uchitel i drug trudyashchikhsya [Teacher 
and Friend of the Working People], Moscow, 1957, p. 55). On 
February 19 and March 11, 1919, the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) adopted 
special decisions on food policy in the Ukraine (see Collected 
Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 37, pp. 522, 630-31). p. 199 

181 Lydia Fotieva, secretary of the C.P.C., asked Lenin to take on 
for work in the C.P.C. Secretariat a woman recommended by the 
Staff Bureau of the C.P.C.'s Managing Department. V. D. Bonch- 
Bruyevich, head of the C.P.C.'s Managing Department, objected 
to the appointment on the grounds that it contravened the decree 
forbidding relatives to work together in the same Soviet institu- 
tions (the candidate had a sister working in the C.P.C). Fotieva 
wrote to Lenin that the woman recommended "is a very valuable 
worker and it would be in our interests to take her on.... Could 
not the decree be bypassed?" p. 200 

182 Lenin wrote this on a letter from the Central Executive Committee 
of the Polish Socialist Party to the C.C., R.C.P.(B.). Point 3 of 
this letter expressed the desire that the question of frontiers with 
Poland should be decided on the basis of self-determination of 
the population living in the disputed territories, primarily in Lith- 
uania and Byelorussia. Lenin's proposal was adopted by the 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.) and was reflected in Chicherin's letter to A. Y. 
Wieckowski, delegate extraordinary of the Polish Government 
(see Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR, Vol. II, 1958, pp. 105- 
06). p. 200 

183 Valentina Pershikova, a member of the staff of the Tsaritsyn Hous- 
ing Department, was arrested for daubing a portrait of Lenin which 
she had torn out of a pamphlet. Requests for Pershikova's release 
were sent in telegrams to Lenin from V. S. Usachov, chief of one 
of the Tsaritsyn militia stations, and from Minin, a Red Army 
man. On Minin's telegram Lenin wrote the following instruction to 
his secretary: "Remind me when the reply comes from the Chair- 
man of the Extraordinary Commission (and afterwards hand all 
the material over to the topical satirists)." (Lenin Miscellany 
XXIV, p. 172.) p. 201 

184 Apparently written at a meeting of the C.P.C. p. 201 

185 Kolegayev replied by telegram that three trains with foodstuffs 
had been dispatched to Moscow. The telegram also gave in- 
formation on the progress of the food collection and pointed out 
that to expedite procurements it was essential to send additional 
workers and responsible food supply executives from the centre. 

p. 201 



502 



NOTES 



On January 29, 1919, the Second Congress of Soviets of Sarapul 
Uyezd, Vyatka Gubernia, adopted a decision to collect grain in 
all villages of the uyezd as a gift to Moscow and Petrograd. The 
Congress decided that the gift of 40,000 poods of grain for Moscow 
"be dispatched and presented personally to our dear and beloved 
leader, Comrade Lenin". Lenin's note was written following his 
reception of the delegation of Sarapul peasants who had accom- 
panied the train-load of grain. It was written, apparently, not on 
March 12 as indicated in the document, but on March 11, 1919. 
This is borne out by the following circumstances. Already on 
March 12 Pravda No. 55 reported that Kamenev, speaking at a 
plenary meeting of the Moscow Soviet on March 11, said: "I re- 
ceived a letter from Comrade Lenin who had been visited by repre- 
sentatives of Sarapul Uyezd, Vyatka Gubernia, who had brought 
40,000 poods of grain as a gift to Moscow. These delegates are 
present at this meeting." The mistake about the date is also 
evident from the fact that on March 12 Lenin was in Petrograd, 
where he addressed a meeting of the Petrograd Soviet in the 
Taurida Palace (see present edition, Vol. 29, pp. 19-37). Lenin 
himself, speaking on March 13, 1919, at a meeting in the Peo- 
ple's House in Petrograd, said: "Only a few days ago a dele- 
gation of peasants representing five volosts in Sarapul Uyezd 
came to see me" (ibid., p. 47). p. 202 

Y. Nikitin, a peasant from Alexeyevo village, Belsk Uyezd, Smo- 
lensk Gubernia, had asked that decrees and other materials need- 
ed for conducting a peasants' political circle be sent to him. p. 202 

Lenin gave this instruction to Petrovsky after receiving a com- 
plaint from peasants of Korbangsk Volost, Kadnikovo Uyezd, 
Vologda Gubernia, about the incorrect attitude of the Volost Exe- 
cutive Committee towards the middle peasants. Lenin wrote the 
instruction on the following draft of a telegram in Krupskaya's 
handwriting: "To the Korbangsk Volost Soviet, Kadnikovo Uyezd 
Vologda Gubernia. Draw up immediately in all villages lists of 
electors to the Soviet, excluding only known kulaks and drawing 
the middle peasants into the elections. After compiling the lists, 
fix new elections to the Soviet. A check will be carried out. Those 
guilty of incorrectly compiling the lists will have to answer for 
it" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 476). 

Shortly after this, on learning of the rude behaviour of A. G. 
Pravdin, a member of the Board of the People's Commissariat 
for Internal Affairs, towards U. P. Mostakova, who had delivered 
the complaint of the Vologda peasants, Lenin wrote to Petrovsky: 
"... Pravdin must be hauled over the coals. Don't let him have his 
own way, and put him under supervision, he has a tendency to- 
wards stupid 'order issuing'. This must be put an end to" (ibid). 

p. 202 

This was a reply to a telegram from V. N. Kayurov, head of the 
Political Department of the 5th Army, who reported the capture 
of Ufa by whiteguard troops and the grave plight of the 5th Ar- 



NOTES 



503 



my. At the same time, Kayurov expressed confidence that if "class- 
conscious, trained reinforcements" were sent, "the enemy will be 
routed". p. 203 

190 G. N. Kaminsky, Chairman of the Tula Gubernia Executive Com- 
mittee, reported by direct line about disturbances at Tula small 
arms and ammunition factories due to the serious food situation 
of the workers and the lack of currency for paying wages. 

On this subject, see also this volume, Document 295, and 
Lenin Miscellany XXIV, pp. 7 and 9. p. 204 

191 This apparently refers to the radio-telegram on the subject of 
exchanging prisoners of war, sent on April 4, 1919, on behalf 
of G. V. Chicherin, People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs, to 
the French Foreign Minister, S. Pichon (see Dokumenty vneshnei 
politiki SSSR, Vol. II, 1958, pp. 512-15). p. 205 

192 On April 5, 1919, on a report by D. I. Kursky, People's Commis- 
sar for Justice, the C.P.C. established standing orders for its 
meetings, adopting all Lenin's proposals. p. 206 

193 Lenin's reply to the peasants of Skopin Uyezd, Ryazan Gubernia, 
was written in connection with the mandate of the uyezd consul- 
tative congress, in which the peasants raised the questions of reduc- 
ing the extraordinary revolutionary tax on peasants of average 
and below-average means, abolishing the mobilisation of draught 
horses and milch cows, increasing the grain quota to be left for 
the peasant farms, and others. p. 207 

194 The decree "On Privileges for Middle Peasants in Levying the 
Extraordinary Revolutionary Tax" was adopted at a session of 
the All-Russia C.E.C. on April 9, 1919. It was published in 
Izvestia on April 10. p. 207 

195 Lenin's letter was written following a talk with F. I. Bodrov, 
Chief of the Supply Section of the Sokolniki Forest School. There 
is a note from Lenin to the Commandant of the Kremlin, written 
on April 7, 1919: "Please admit the bearer, Comrade Filipp Ilyich 
Bodrov, to the Kremlin and the Council of People's Commissars. 
V. Ulyanov (Lenin), Chairman, C.P.C." (Lenin Miscellany XXIV, 
p. 288). 

Regarding Bodrov, see also Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 
50, Document 555. p. 207 

196 At the time Panyushkin was at the North-Western Front. In con- 
nection with Kolchak's offensive Panyushkin's detachment was 
sent to the Eastern Front 

See also Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, Document 512. p. 208 

197 Lenin's radio-telegrams to Bela Kun were sent in connection with 
the news of the proclamation of a Soviet Republic in Munich on 
April 7, 1919. At that time it was not yet known in Moscow that 
the Soviet Republic in Munich had been proclaimed by leaders 



504 



NOTES 



of the German Social-Democrats and of the Centrist Independent 
Social-Democratic Party of Germany, who by this manoeuvre 
wanted to deceive the workers and to discredit the idea of Soviet 
power. Conditions in Bavaria not yet being ripe for the proclama- 
tion of a Soviet Republic, the Bavarian Communists refused to 
take part in this provocative act of adventurism. 

On April 13, 1919, when the Bavarian counter-revolutionaries 
made an attempt to seize power, a furious struggle took place on 
the streets of Munich, ending in the victory of the workers. A So- 
viet government was set up in Bavaria — the Executive Committee 
headed by the leader of the Bavarian Communists, Eugene 
Levin; the government also included Independents. The Govern- 
ment of the Bavarian Soviet Republic set about disarming the 
bourgeoisie, organising a Red Army, nationalising the banks, es- 
tablishing workers' control at enterprises, and organising food 
supply. 

On April 27, 1919, Lenin wrote his "Message of Greetings 
to the Bavarian Soviet Republic", in which he gave the revolu- 
tionary government of Bavaria advice in the form of a concrete 
programme of action for the proletarian party that had come to 
power (see present edition, Vol. 29, pp. 325-26). 

The home and foreign situation of the Bavarian Soviet Repub- 
lic was a difficult one. At the very first difficulties encountered 
by the Soviet Republic the representatives of the "Independent 
Social-Democrats" began to pursue a treacherous policy. Towards 
the end of April, the Independents succeeded in removing the 
Communists from leading positions. Taking advantage of this 
situation the counter-revolutionaries went over to the offensive. 
On May 1, whiteguard units entered Munich and after three days' 
hard fighting captured the city. p. 208 

This telegram was sent in connection with a report from Knya- 
ginin Uyezd, Nizhni-Novgorod Gubernia, addressed to Lenin at 
the Council of People's Commissars, stating that the local author- 
ities were forcibly making the peasants join artels and communes. 

The telegram was drafted in the People's Commissariat for 
Agriculture. 

On April 10, 1919, the following circular letter, signed by 
Lenin and Sereda, was published in Izvestia: 
"To all Gubernia Land Departments. 
"Copies to Executive Committees. 

"Information has reached the People's Commissariat for Agri- 
culture that for the purpose of organising state farms, communes 
and other collective associations, the land departments and state 
farm boards, contrary to the intent of Article 9 of the Regulations 
on Socialist Organisation of Agriculture, are taking away from 
the peasants the lands of former landowners' estates which had 
been made over to them. The impermissibility of such practices 
is hereby confirmed. Lands being worked by peasants at the time 
of the publication of the Regulations on Socialist Organisation 
of Agriculture, and which were put at their disposal on the basis 



NOTES 



505 



of decisions or instructions of uyezd or gubernia land departments, 
may not on any account be forcibly alienated for the purpose of 
organising state farms, communes or other collective associations. 
The alienation of lands from the peasants for the sake of the above- 
mentioned organisations is permissible only by voluntary consent 
by way of land tenure regulation. Measures of coercion to make 
the peasants practise joint cultivation and join communes and 
other types of collective farming are impermissible. The transi- 
tion to collective forms is to be carried out only in strict conformi- 
ty with the Regulations, without any compulsion on the part of 
the authorities. Non-fulfilment of the present instruction will be 
punished in accordance with the laws of the revolutionary period. 
Inform the population of the present instruction as widely as pos- 
sible. 

"Lenin 

"Chairman, Council of People's Commissars 

"Sereda 

"People's Commissar for Agriculture 
"April 9, 1919." p. 209 

199 Ti^g telegram is a reply to those sent by N. N. Kuzmin, Milita- 
ry Commissar of the 6th Army, on April 8, 1919, reporting a pro- 
posal by General Ironside for an exchange of prisoners of war. 
Kuzmin asked to be authorised to conduct negotiations. p. 209 

200 In a telegram by direct line, Minin, a member of the Board of the 
People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs, informed Lenin of 
the termination of the strike at the Tula arms factories and railway 
workshops. The telegram mentioned the need for timely and regu- 
lar supply of food for the workers of the Tula factories through the 
People's Commissariat for Food, and the speedy delivery by the 
People's Commissariat for Finance of money for paying wages. 

Above the text of Minin's telegram, Lenin wrote: "For the 
Orgbureau of the C.C." p. 210 

201 Lenin wrote this telegram in connection with the receipt by him 
on April 12, 1919, of a telegram from Maxim Gorky reporting the 
arrest of the writer Ivan Volny in Maloarkhangelsk and asking 
for "an impartial investigation of the reasons for the arrest and 
his liberation under surveillance". "I have no doubt of his politi- 
cal loyalty," wrote Gorky. 

See also this volume, documents 297 and 452. p. 210 

202 rpjjjg document was apparently drafted in the People's Commissar- 
iat for Health since it was typed on the Commissariat's notepaper 
and signed also by People's Commissar for Health N. A. Semashko. 

p. 211 

203 On April 11, 1919, Izvestia published a decree of the C.P.C. call- 
ing up for military service in the Red Army workers and peasants 
of the central gubernias who did not exploit the labour of others, 



506 



NOTES 



and who were born between 1886 and 1890. In his telegram Zino- 
viev reported that a meeting of Petrograd Communists had de- 
cided to mobilise up to 20 per cent of the members of the Party 
over and above the general mobilisation. p. 212 

204 This refers to the inclusion of Socialist-Revolutionaries in the Uk- 
rainian Government. p. 213 

205 This refers to an offensive by the troops of the Crimean Front, under 
the command of P. Y. Dybenko, into the interior of the Crimean 
Peninsula. The offensive was a mistake, since the attacking units 
could have been cut off in the Perekop Isthmus from the main 
forces and, moreover, at that time it was essential to concentrate 
maximum forces for an attack in the chief strategic direction — 
that of the Donets Basin and Rostov. p. 213 

206 The instruction to Dzerzhinsky was written by Lenin on the copy 
of a letter forwarded to him by the People's Commissariat for Agri- 
culture. The letter was from N. D. Gorelov and P. I. Novikov, 
representatives of the peasants of Pochep Uyezd, Chernigov Gu- 
bernia, who had come to Moscow with a complaint about the 
abuses practised by the local authorities and had been received 
by Lenin. They wrote that on their return home they had been 
subjected to persecution and even arrested. p. 213 

207 This refers to a telegram from the Tambov Consumers' Society 
to the Council of People's Commissars concerning implementa- 
tion of the decree of the C.P.C., dated March 16, 1919 on con- 
sumers' communes. The decree provided for the amalgamation 
of all consumers' co-operatives in town and country into consum- 
ers' communes with the aim of creating a single distributive ap- 
paratus. The telegram from Tambov reported that 252 members 
of the Tambov Consumers' Society found at their meeting that 
trade was being conducted properly and "do not want to hand 
over the Consumers' Society to consumers' communes". p. 214 

208 rpjjjg j s a re piy to a telegram received on April 21, 1919, from Com- 
mander-in-Chief I. I. Vatsetis and member of the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Republic S. I. Aralov, inquiring whether 
an advance into Galicia and Bukovina was permissible politically 
and what objective it pursued. 

Lenin wrote on the telegram from Vatsetis and Aralov: "To 
Comrade Sklyansky's secretary: please code and send off the at- 
tached (this probably refers to Lenin's telegram.— Ed.), then pass 
it on to Comrade Sklyansky for filing." (Iz istorii grazhdanskoi 
voiny v SSSR, Vol. 2, 1961, p. 382.) p. 215 

209 Lenin's directives to Sklyansky were written on a report from 
Commander-in-Chief Vatsetis dated April 23, 1919, concerning 
the military situation of the R.S.F.S.R. Vatsetis argued the ne- 
cessity to unite the armed forces of the Soviet Republics and place 
them under a single command; he also proposed that the system 
of Universal Military Training should be temporarily done away 



NOTES 



507 



with and its 24,000 instructors mobilised to strengthen the com- 
mand of the reserve units on the Eastern Front. p. 216 

210 The report of Vatsetis has a postscript by Aralov, who objected 
to the total liquidation of the U.M.T. and proposed simply re- 
ducing it by 50 to 75 per cent. p. 216 

211 Lenin's instruction to Zinoviev was written on a letter from V. N. 
Yakovleva, a member of the Board of the People's Commissariat 
for Food, replying to an inquiry of Lenin's concerning a request 
by the Petrograd Co-operative of Ukrainian Citizens for their ra- 
tioned food products to be turned over to them. The letter stated 
that, at the request of the Ukrainian Soviet Government, the 
People's Commissariat for Food, by way of exception, had permit- 
ted this co-operative to import from the Ukraine a small amount 
of rationed food products, but that A. Y. Badayev, Food Commis- 
sar of the Petrograd Labour Commune, had prevented it. Yakov- 
leva wrote that this was not the first case of failure on the part of 
Badayev to comply with the instructions of the People's Commis- 
sariat for Food. 

On this subject see also this volume, Document 318. p. 218 

212 On May 25, 1919, after examining the question of material assist- 
ance for V. I. Taneyev, a Russian revolutionary democrat, public 
figure and scholar, the Council of People's Commissars decided 
to assign him a monthly social security pension of 2,000 rubles, 
and authorised Lenin to sign a Protection Certificate. p. 218 

213 See Karl Marx's letter of January 9, 1877, to M. M. Kovalevsky 
(K. Marx and F. Engels, Collected Works, 2nd Russian Ed., Vol. 
34, p. 185). p. 219 

214 Written by Lenin in reply to a note from Kamenev, who proposed 
"to ease and shut one's eyes to" the free transport of foodstuffs, 
with the exception of grain, as, in his opinion, in any case "we 
shall come to this in June". p. 221 

215 Written at a time when Communists were being mobilised for 
the struggle against Kolchak, this note is a reply to Kostelov- 
skaya, a Party member. She asked how she was to understand her 
appointment to the Eastern Front as the head of the Political De- 
partment of the 2nd Army. p. 222 

216 This instruction to Rudzutak, Chairman of the Chief Board of 
Water Transport, was written by Lenin on a telegram from 
Kazan to the Board. The telegram reported failure to take out 
several vessels with grain, crude oil and paraffin from Chis- 
topol (Eastern Front), which had been occupied by whiteguard 
troops, owing to the boats coming under fire from whiteguard 
cavalry. p. 222 

217 This was written on a telegram from K. A. Mekhonoshin, Chair- 
man of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 11th Army, 
who asked that part of the 33rd Division, which was to be trans- 



508 



NOTES 



ferred to the Eastern Front, should be left in the Astrakhan area. 
Mekhonoshin reported that the transfer of the whole 33rd Divi- 
sion and the impossibility of a rapid formation of the 34th Divi- 
sion, owing to the delay in sending promised reinforcements, would 
compel them to stop the offensive against Kizlyar and give up 
the idea of capturing Guriev and Rakusha, where there was oil, 
and would put the fleet, which was threatened with loss of its 
base, in a hopeless position. "The absence of precise orders from 
Field Headquarters," wrote Mekhonoshin, "puts the army in an 
absolutely impossible position and gives grounds for accusing us 
of inactivity." Lenin made a number of underlinings and markings 
on Mekhonoshin's telegram (Lenin Miscellany XXXIV, pp. 127- 
28). ' p. 222 

218 Lenin wrote this note on a statement by A. Y. Badayev to the 
Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Petrograd Soviet 
of Workers' and Red Army Deputies. Badayev tried to justify 
the various instances of non-fulfilment by him of the orders of 
the People's Commissariat for Food (see Note 211), claiming that 
the accusations against him were "intrigues of a definite group 
in the Centre" and asking to be relieved within five days of his 
post as Food Commissar of the Petrograd Labour Commune, p. 223 

219 On May 4, 1919, a letter addressed to Lenin was received by radio 
from Fridtjof Nansen, Norwegian scientist and arctic explorer. 
The letter was dated April 17, 1919. In it Nansen gave the text 
of his appeal to the heads of government of the four Entente 
Powers (U.S.A., France, Great Britain and Italy) proposing the 
setting up of a committee to organise aid for Russia with food 
and medical supplies, and their reply. In their reply the heads 
of the Entente Powers (Woodrow Wilson, David Lloyd George, 
Georges Clemenceau and Vittorio Orlando) made this aid con- 
ditional on the cessation of military operations on the territory 
of Russia, but without indicating whether this condition would 
be binding on the powers who were pursuing a policy of armed 
intervention against the Soviet Republic. Nansen had obviously 
failed to see through the manoeuvres of the Entente leaders and 
expressed his agreement with the conditions they had put for- 
ward. On the same day, May 4, Lenin informed Chicherin that 
this question had been referred to the Political Bureau of the Cen- 
tral Committee of the R.C.P.(B.) and asked him to draft a reply 
to Nansen, emphasising the need to expose the imperialists. 

Lenin's letter published here contains his remarks on the draft 
reply to Nansen. p. 224 

220 William Bullitt, the American diplomat, came to Soviet Russia in 
March 1919 to ascertain the conditions on which the Soviet Gov- 
ernment would agree to conclude peace with the Entente countries 
as well as with the whiteguard governments on Russian territory. 
Proposals emanating from the U.S. President, Woodrow Wilson, 
and the British Prime Minister, Lloyd George, were transmitted 
through Bullitt. The Soviet Government, striving for the speediest 



NOTES 



509 



conclusion of peace, agreed to negotiations on the proposed terms, 
introducing into them, however, some essential amendments (for 
the text of the peace proposal drafted by the U.S. government 
representative, Bullitt, and the Government of the R.S.F.S.R., 
see Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR, Vol. II, 1958, pp. 91-95). 
Shortly after Bullitt's departure from Soviet Russia, Kolchak 
succeeded in achieving some successes on the Eastern Front, and 
the imperialist governments, anticipating the collapse of the Soviet 
state, refused peace negotiations. Wilson forbade publication of 
the draft agreement brought by Bullitt, and Lloyd George, in 
a speech in Parliament, declared that he had nothing to do with 
the negotiations with the Soviet Government. p. 225 

221 Lenin's remarks on the draft replies to Nansen were fully taken 
into account in the radio-telegram of May 7, 1919 (see Dokumenty 
vneshnei politiki SSSR, Vol. II, 1958, pp. 154-60). The plan put 
forward by Nansen came to nothing. p. 226 

222 Under pressure from the White Cossacks, the Soviet troops, which 
had been on the defensive east of Orenburg, withdrew and occupied 
positions seven kilometres from the town. p. 227 

223 Lunacharsky, who had been sent to Kostroma as an authorised 
agent of the All-Russia C.E.C. to combat desertions, reported on 
the serious food situation in Kostroma and Kostroma Guber- 
nia. p. 229 

224 This refers to the counter-revolutionary revolt of Ataman Gri- 
goriev, which broke out at the beginning of May 1919 in the rear 
of the Soviet troops in the Ekaterinoslav and Kherson gubernias. 
The revolt directly threatened the flank and rear of the Soviet 
troops in the Donets Basin and the rear communications of units 
of the 2nd Ukrainian Army in the Crimea, and also hindered rail- 
way transport throughout the Ukraine. In the period from May 
11 to 24, by simultaneous blows from the east, north and south, 
the troops of the Ukrainian armies routed the insurgents, p. 230 

225 On April 24, 1919, the Council of People's Commissars adopted 
the decree "On Organising Migration to the Producing Gubernias 
and the Don Region". The migration of peasants and workers 
of the northern gubernias of the R.S.F.S.R. to the southern areas 
of the country was carried out in order to ease their plight in the 
matter of food supply and restore agriculture in localities which 
had suffered from whiteguard revolts. 

On this subject see also the telegram of May 21, 1919, signed 
by Lenin and S. P. Sereda, sent to the gubernia land departments 
in Smolensk, Tver, Moscow and Ryazan (Lenin Miscellany XXXIV, 
pp. 144-45). p. 230 

226 In a telegram to the Central Committee of the R.C.P.(B.), S. I. Gu- 
sev, M. M. Lashevich and K. K. Yurenev, members of the Revo- 
lutionary Military Council of the Eastern Front, objected to 



510 



NOTES 



S. S. Kamenev being replaced by A. A. Samoilo as commander 
of the Eastern Front. The telegram stated that F. V. Kostyaev, 
Chief of Staff of the Revolutionary Military Council of the Repub- 
lic, was making unwarranted replacements of army commanders, 
and that S. I. Aralov, a member of the R.M.C. of the Republic 
endorsed these orders of Kostyaev's by his signature. On May 25, 
1919, S. S. Kamenev was reappointed commander of the Eastern 
Front. ' p. 231 

227 The occasion for Lenin's telegram was the receipt on May 20, 
1919, at 7.10 p.m., of a telegram addressed to him, which reported 
that on their arrival in Novgorod, after having been received by 
Lenin, the Chairman of the Artel Association, A. A. Bulatov, and 
the Manager of the Instructors' Department, Lyubimov, had been 
arrested. 

Lenin wrote the following note on the telegram he had re- 
ceived: "File for handy reference. Reply sent 20/V." 

The inquiry mentioned by Lenin was made on May 13, 1919 
(see Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, Document 567). p. 232 

228 Riga was captured on May 22, 1919, by the German troops under 
General Goltz and by the Lettish whiteguards. p. 233 

229 On May 26, 1919, Lenin sent another telegram to the Voronezh 
Gubernia Military Commissar (a copy was sent to the Gubernia 
Party Committee), stating: "Report immediately how many Com- 
munists have been sent to the Southern Front. Lenin, Chairman 
of the Council of People's Commissars." (V. I. Lenin, Voyennaya 
perepiska, Moscow, 1957, p. 133.) p. 235 

230 The sentence in the telegram from the words "Bear in mind" to 
the words "and the Ukraine" was written by Lenin. The first 
part of the telegram is a typewritten text, apparently written 
by Chicherin since there is a note by him to the document 
saying: "To Comrade Lenin. Draft of a telegram; please reply 
whether you agree to it." He also wrote the last sentence: "Excep- 
tions — Chinese workers, Persians, by orders from the centre." p. 235 

231 Alexandria and Znamenka were centres of the counter-revolution- 
ary revolt of Ataman Grigoriev. On the night of May 21, 1919, 
Soviet troops fought their way into Alexandria, where Grigoriev 
had his headquarters. p. 236 

232 On the same day, May 28, 1919, another telegram, signed by Lenin, 
Krestinsky and Kamenev, was sent by direct line to Rakovsky, 
Chairman of the Ukrainian Council of People's Commissars. It 
contained the full test of the decision adopted by the C.C. of the 
R.C.P.(B.) and outlined concrete measures for its fulfilment (see 
Lenin Miscellany XXXIV, p. 153). p. 236 

233 Towards the end of May the front of the Soviet troops at Mille- 
rovo was broken through, which resulted in the withdrawal of 



NOTES 



511 



units of the Southern Front and allowed Denikin's forces to unite 
with Cossack insurgents in villages of the Upper Don. p. 238 

In a letter to the Organising Bureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) en- 
titled "Pandering to Prejudices", Y. M. Yaroslavsky asked the 
members of the Bureau whether persons who took part in religious 
ceremonies could be allowed to remain in the Party. p. 239 

This refers to the plan of the Ukraine's army men to set up a Re- 
volutionary Military Council of the Donets Basin Front subordi- 
nated to the Southern Front and consisting of the 2nd Ukrainian, 
the 8th and the 13th armies. The plan was communicated to 
Lenin from Kharkov on May 31 by a telegram from the author- 
ised agent of the Council of Defence. p. 241 

On May 27, 1919, the C.P.C. heard a report by A. I. Svidersky, 
a member of the Board of the People's Commissariat for Food 
on the state of grain procurements and on plans for the food pro- 
curement campaign before the next harvest. The Council decided 
to publish Svidersky's report in the form of an article and to 
transmit abroad by radio a short communication about it with 
statistical data. 

Lenin's instruction to the secretary was written on the text 
of the prepared radio-information, which stressed that, in spite 
of extremely adverse conditions (lack of commodities, devalua- 
tion of the currency, seizure by whiteguards of the main grain- 
growing regions), procurements of grain in 1919 were proceeding 
more successfully than in the previous year: the Soviet food sup- 
ply organisations collected 102 million poods of grain during the 
nine months (from August 1918 to April 1919) compared with 
only 28 million poods during the ten months (from November 
1917 to August 1918) 

Svidersky's article "Immediate Food Prospects" was pub- 
lished in Izvestia for June 3 and 4, 1919. p. 241 

This telegram concerns the situation on the Western Front and the 
conflict between A. I. Okulov, a member of the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Western Front, on the one hand, and J. V. 
Stalin, G. Y. Zinoviev and the leadership of the 7th Army, on 
the other. In the Central Party Archives of the Institute of Marx- 
ism-Leninism of the C.C., C.P.S.U., there are notes on this ques- 
tion which were exchanged between Lenin and Sklyansky at a 
meeting. Lenin wrote to Sklyansky: "Stalin demands the recall 
of Okulov, whom he accuses of intrigues and disorganisation." 
In answer to a note of Sklyansky's giving a favourable testimonial 
of Okulov, Lenin gave the following directive to Sklyansky: "Then 
draft the text of a telegram (a precise statement of what the 7th 
Army is accused by Okulov) and I will send a code message to 
Stalin and Zinoviev to keep the conflict within bounds and chan- 
nel it in the right direction." The draft of the telegram published 
here was drawn up in accordance with this directive and after- 
wards supplemented and signed by Lenin. 



512 



NOTES 



On the subject of the recall of Okulov, see also this volume, 
Document 354. p. 242 

228 Lenin's note to Chicherin was written in connection with a let- 
ter from M. Barakatullah, an Indian professor, who wrote about 
the struggle against British imperialism in India, and asked that 
his article on Bolshevism be published "in order to win the 
hearts of the Moslems to the support of Bolshevism". p. 244 

239 The ultimatum mentioned in this note was presented to the Brit- 
ish Government by a delegation of the British Trades Union Con- 
gress. The workers demanded that the government should not 
interfere in the internal affairs of Soviet Russia and Soviet Hun- 
gary and threatened a general strike if their demands were not 
met. p. 244 

240 On June 6, 1919, the Political Bureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
passed a decision to transfer S. P. Natsarenus to the Ukraine. In this 
connection the following telegram was sent to Stalin: "Politbureau 
of C.C. has decided, in view of the extreme necessity of immediate- 
ly effecting unity of command in the Ukraine, to appoint Natsa- 
renus a member of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 14th 
Army, formerly the 2nd Ukrainian Army. Lenin, Krestinsky, Kame- 
nev." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 490.) p. 247 

241 This refers to repulsing Finnish whiteguards who were making 
attacks on the Soviet frontier. p. 247 

242 For Sklyansky's telegram to Melnichansky on June 9, and to 
Beloborodov on June 10, 1919, see the book: V. I. Lenin, Vo- 
yennaya pereptska, Moscow, 1957, p. 148. p. 250 

243 While the Southern group of troops of the Eastern Front were con- 
ducting decisive offensive operations against Kolchak, White Cos- 
sack and kulak revolts flared up in a number of front-line areas 
(Samara and Orenburg gubernias, the Urals Region). p. 251 

244 On receiving Lenin's telegram, Stalin wrote on it a reply for dis- 
patch to Moscow: "What was lost has not yet been recovered. Heavy 
crossfire is going on. Everything that could be sent has been sent 
for operations by land. Obviously it is impossible and inadvis- 
able to leave for Moscow during these days. Postpone the plenum. 
We have no objection to publication of part of the document...." 
(Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 50, p. 490.) 

The document mentioned in the telegram has not been found. 

p. 253 

245 The counter-revolutionary mutiny at Fort Krasnaya Gorka, which 
broke out during the night of June 12, 1919, was put down dur- 
ing the night of June 13. Fort Seraya Loshad, which had joined 
the rebels, also fell during the day of June 16. Only a few hours 
before the mutiny was suppressed, the Soviet command received 
information that a British naval force of 23 ships had set out 
from Libau to aid the Krasnaya Gorka mutineers. In view of the 



NOTES 



513 



fact, however, that the Soviet fleet dominated the sea approaches 
to Petrograd, the British command did not venture to begin large 
scale operations and was compelled to limit the activities of its 
squadron to isolated actions. p. 254 

246 This refers to the decision of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), dated June 
15, 1919, on General Headquarters. In a statement to the C.C. 
Trotsky opposed this decision, which he described as containing 
"whims, mischief", etc. p. 255 

247 Lenin wrote this letter in connection with the strike of workers 
at a number of enterprises of Tver Gubernia. The strike, which 
broke out in the middle of June 1919 and lasted several days, 
was caused by dissatisfaction among the workers over the reduc- 
tion of the bread ration and food supplies. Counter-revolutionary 
elements tried to take advantage of the economic difficulties of 
the Soviet Republic in order to inflame anti-Soviet sentiments. 

The question of the food strikes was discussed at joint meet- 
ings of the Politbureau and Orgbureau of the C.C, R.C.P.(B.) 
on June 18 and 24, 1919. Special measures were taken to improve 
the position of the workers of the textile district. p. 255 

248 re f ers ^ 0 a revo it in the rear of Kolchak's army. 

The Kustanai partisans who broke through to the Soviet forces 
were formed into a Communist Regiment which fought the ene- 
mies of the revolution to the very end of the Civil War. p. 256 

249 In a telegram on June 20, 1919, V. I. Nevsky and L. S. Sosnovsky 
reported from Tver that the strike was at an end and all enter- 
prises were resuming work. They wrote that, over and above the 
delegates constitutionally elected by the uyezd congresses for the 
forthcoming Gubernia Congress of Soviets, the Gubernia Execu- 
tive Committee had invited an extra delegate from each volost 
for the purpose of strengthening ties with the countryside. The 
Gubernia Congress of Soviets decided to ask the C.E.C. to grant 
the volost delegates the right to vote. Nevsky and Sosnovsky ob- 
jected to this, stressing that 80 per cent of the volost delegates 
were non-Party, predominantly kulak elements, and they asked 
Lenin to reply urgently. 

The telegraph form on which Lenin's telegram was written 
bears a note by him: "FiZes." p. 257 

On June 23, 1919, Lenin received a telegram from the River Trans- 
port Administration Committee, reporting the existence of large 
stocks of grain on the Belaya River and the need to expedite its 
dispatch. 

In reply to Lenin's inquiry, Svidersky reported that, in order 
to expedite grain procurements on the Belaya River and in Ufa 
Gubernia in general, M. I. Frumkin, a member of the Board of 
the People's Commissariat for Food, had gone there from Samara, 
and that measures would be taken to send food army men to the 
Belaya. p. 258 



514 



NOTES 



251 This refers to the offensive of General Wrangel's Caucasian army, 
which was part of Denikin's forces, in the direction of Saratov 
and Penza. p. 259 

252 In his reply to Lenin on the same day, Frunze wired: "I have 
devoted and am devoting the most serious attention to the 
enemy operations on the Urals Front, particularly in the area 
of Nikolayevsk, in view of the obvious danger of the Kolchak 
and Denikin fronts linking up on the Volga. Unfortunately, in 
this sector I have had at my disposal only weak units, completely 
untrained and often poorly armed forces. All the rest were sent 
against Kolchak at the time of his offensive against Samara and 
until now have been engaged in the Ufa direction...." (Iz istorii 
grazhdanskoi voiny v SSSR, Vol. 2, 1961, p. 234.) Frunze assured 
Lenin that Uralsk and the entire northern part of the region 
would be cleared of whiteguards within 10 to 14 days. On July 
11, 1919, the Red Army liberated Uralsk. p. 259 

253 On June 16, 1919, the C.P.C. received a telegram from military 
engineer Y. A. Berkalov stating that the finance department of 
the Porokhovo District Soviet of Petrograd had imposed an ex- 
traordinary tax of 40,000 rubles on the 50,000 rubles granted to 
Berkalov by a decision of the C.P.C. of November 26, 1918, as 
a reward for his artillery invention (consisting in the discovery 
of methods for long-range artillery fire and for increasing the 
muzzle velocity of the shells) 

The decision of the C.P.C. "On Inventions", dated June 30, 
1919, which laid down that rewards for inventions were exempt 
from taxation, was published on July 4 in Izvestia No. 144. 

p. 260 

254 Lenin advised Gorky to "take a trip" on the propaganda steamer 
Red Star, which was making a cruise on the Volga and Kama. 
Krupskaya took part in this trip along with a group of top- 
level functionaries of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), the C.E.C., and var- 
ious People's Commissariats. On July 10, Lenin wired Krup- 
skaya: "I saw Gorky today and tried to persuade him to travel 
on your steamer, about which I had sent a telegram to Nizhni, 
but he flatly refused." (See present edition, Vol. 37, p. 545.) 

p. 260 

255 On July 3, 1919, the Bureau of the Women's Organisation in 
Sormovo requested N. K. Krupskaya, who had come to Sormovo, 
to help obtain a building from the Sormovo Works Management 
for a children's home. Housing belonging to the works could 
be made over to other institutions only by an order of the Council 
of Defence; hence the application of the Sormovo Women's 
Organisation was forwarded to Lenin. Lenin's directive was con- 
sidered at a meeting of the Presidium of the Sormovo Soviet on 
July 18. The matter was referred for a final decision to the Pre- 
sidium of the Nizhni-Novgorod Gubernia Executive Committee, 



NOTES 



515 



which decided to meet the request of the Sormovo Women's 
Organisation. p. 261 

256 At the beginning of July the Command of the Southern Front asked 
Lenin to permit a call-up of 18-year-old working men in dis- 
tricts close to the front. Before putting the matter before the 
Council of Defence, Lenin asked the All-Russia Chief Head- 
quarters for information about reinforcements sent to the Southern 
Front. In reply to Lenin's telegram of July 8, the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Southern Front repeated its request. On 
July 11, 1919, the Council of Defence decided "to permit the 
R.M.C. of the Southern Front to carry out mobilisation of 
18-year-olds in the above-mentioned areas" (Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 378). In addition, the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Republic was instructed to adopt meas- 
ures for the immediate dispatch of the trained units to the 
fronts, primarily the Southern Front. p. 262 

257 F. Shturmin, a Red Army soldier, sent a letter to Lenin asking 
for orders to be sent to the Nizhni-Novgorod Uyezd Military 
Commissariat to give him his pay for the period of his illness. 
Together with the note to Sklyansky, Lenin sent the documents 
he had received from Shturmin. p. 262 

258 The text of Lenin's directive was quoted by N. P. Gorbunov, 
head of the Science and Technology Department of the Supreme 
Economic Council of the R.S.F.S.R., in the general plan drawn 
up by him on July 14, 1919, outlining measures for the extraction 
of oil, coal, sapropel, shales and fuel gases. 

In the spring of 1919 a large expedition from the Chief Shale 
Committee was sent to the Volga to organise the exploitation of 
fuel shales and bituminous deposits in Undory, Kapshira (near 
Syzran) and Syukeyevo. 

In the second half of July and in August 1919, a number of 
executives on the staff of the Chief Shale Committee, headed by 
I. M. Gubkin, went to the Volga to check on the work of the 
expedition and give it assistance. Included in the group were F. F. 
Syromolotov, Chairman of the Chief Mining Board of the Supreme 
Economic Council, and V. P. Nogin, who enlisted the co-opera- 
tion of local Party and administrative organisations. The results of 
the expedition's work were reported to Lenin (see I. M. Gubkin's 
contribution in the book Vospominaniya o Vladimire Ilyiche 
Lenine [Recollections about Vladimir Ilyich Lenin], Part 2, Moscow, 
1957, pp. 300-19). p. 264 

259 J. Hanecki, a member of the Board of the People's Commissariat 
for Finance, was to draft a reply to Rakovsky's telegram received 
by Lenin on July 16, 1919, requesting the dispatch of money that 
had been promised in connection with the acute financial crisis 
in the Ukraine. Hanecki drew up the following reply: "Today 
300 is being sent, of which 50 are assigned for Kaluga. In future, 
consignments will be made regularly." On Hanecki's reply Lenin 



516 



NOTES 



wrote his second note and marked at the top of the document 
"Reply to Rakovsky". p. 265 

260 In a telegram to the Soviet Government of Latvia on July 17, 
1919, Lenin wrote: "Please get in touch with Stalin, member 
of the Revolutionary Military Council of the Western Front, on 
the question of the change of name." (Lenin Miscellany XXIV, 
p. 194.) The renaming of the Lettish Division did not take place; 
it retained its old name — the Lettish Rifle Division. p. 266 

261 The Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Republic 
at that time was S. S. Kamenev. p. 266 

262 Lenin is referring to the capture of Zlatoust by the 5th Army 
(July 13, 1919), and of Ekaterinburg (now Sverdlovsk) by the 
2nd Army on July 14, 1919. p. 267 

263 The question of establishing fixed prices for grain and manufac- 
tured goods was discussed at a meeting of the C.P.C. on July 22, 
1919, and at further meetings of the Council on July 24 and 31. 
The decision adopted on July 31 laid down that the selling price 
for workers and office employees would remain as before, and the 
People's Commissariat for Food and the Board of the Supreme 
Economic Council were directed not later than September 1, 1919, 
to sign and publish fixed prices for foodstuffs and manufactured 
goods. p. 268 

264 In reply (their telegram of July 28, 1919) Frunze and Lashevich 
informed Lenin that the situation south of Buzuluk and in the 
Uralsk area gave no cause for alarm; that not later than July 31 
the whole right bank of the Ural River would be liberated from 
the enemy, and that the railway to Uralsk was cleared and rapidly 
being repaired. The telegram also mentioned that a serious 
situation had arisen north of Astrakhan. p. 269 

265 This refers to the plan of struggle against Denikin drawn up by 
the Commander-in-Chief, S. S. Kamenev. According to this plan, 
the main attack was to be delivered by the left wing of the South- 
ern Front via the Don Region with a secondary attack in the Khar- 
kov direction. The plan was expounded in a directive of the Su- 
preme Command dated July 23, 1919 (see Iz istorii grazhdanskoi 
voiny v SSSR, Vol. 2, 1961, pp. 499-500). On July 27, 1919, L. D. 
Trotsky sent a telegram to E. M. Sklyansky, Deputy Chairman 
of the Revolutionary Military Council of the Republic, in which 
he reported that "Commander of the Southern Front Yegoriev 
considers Kamenev's operational plan for the south to be wrong, 
and in carrying it out does not expect success" (Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 381). This opinion, Trotsky wrote, was 
shared by Sokolnikov, member of the Revolutionary Military 
Council of the front, and Peremytov, Chief of Operations Divi- 
sion. ' p. 270 

266 Written in reply to a communication from Bela Kun about the 
serious situation of the Hungarian Soviet Republic, against which 



NOTES 



517 



an armed intervention had been started, and to his request for 
urgent aid from Soviet Russia. p. 271 

267 Lenin, who was resting at Gorki on August 3 and 4, 1919, appar- 
ently wrote this note in connection with the fact that at the end 
of July and beginning of August 1919 strong rumours were current 
in the West-European press, and were also spread by the Russian 
Mensheviks and Socialist-Revolutionaries, about an imminent re- 
placement of the Soviet Government in Russia by a coalition gover- 
nment (with the participation of Mensheviks and Socialist-Revo- 
lutionaries). Pravda on August 6 and Izvestia on August 8 pub- 
lished articles ridiculing these rumours, which reflected the im- 
perialists' hopes for the overthrow of Soviet rule in Russia with 
the aid of social traitors, as had occurred in Hungary. p. 272 

268 fjjjg re f ers to Trotsky's telegram to Lenin reporting that at a meet- 
ing in Kiev on August 6, 1919, attended by L. D. Trotsky, 
Kh. G. Rakovsky, A. I. Yegorov, S. I. Aralov, N. G. Semyonov and 
V. P. Zatonsky, it was decided to withdraw the Soviet troops 
to a new line and to surrender to the enemy the Black Sea coast 
with Odessa and Nikolayev. p. 273 

269 Written on a letter from C. S. Bobrovskaya, a professional revol- 
utionary and member of the Party since 1898, asking Lenin to 
help fix her up with a job. p. 275 

270 Lenin is referring to Smilga's letter to the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) re- 
porting on the grave situation at the Southern Front. "The chief 
and basic cause of our reverses," he wrote, "lies in the inability 
of the Revolutionary Military Council of the Southern Front to 

command and control the troops The Revolutionary Military 

Council, as now constituted, is ineffectual. Failure to understand 
one another is so great that the idea of achieving any harmony 
in the work is ruled out." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, 
p. 382.) p. 276 

271 This note was apparently written during a meeting of the Council 
of People's Commissars on August 26, 1919, at which the work 
of the Food Research Institute was discussed. The C.P.C. decided 
"that a report by the People's Commissariat for Health and the 
People's Commissariat for Food on the practical tasks of the Food 
Research Institute be made within three months. Within the 
same period, a report by the Food Research Institute to be made 
on the techniques of producing sugar from sawdust". Fotieva 
wrote on Lenin's note: "Fulfilled 28.VIII." 

Apparently at the same sitting, Krasin wrote a note to Lenin 
saying that 18 lbs. of sugar could be obtained from one pood of 
sawdust. Lenin wrote back in reply: "Unbelievable — 18 lbs. from 
one pood!! 45 per cent??? Sugar content? %?" (Lenin Miscellany 
XXIV, p. 29.) Lenin frequently reverted to this subject (see pres- 
ent edition, Vol. 35, Document 230). p. 278 

272 Mamontov's cavalry corps was directed by Denikin to deliver 
a blow in the rear of the Soviet troops on the Southern Front. On 



518 



NOTES 



August 10, 1919, Mamontov's cavalry broke through the front 
in the vicinity of Novokhopersk and raided a number of towns 
and villages. This created a threat to the Soviet forces, made offen- 
sive operations difficult, and upset the system of command and 
supply in various places. Lenin considered it an urgent task to 
organise the rout of Mamontov's corps (see Collected Works, Fifth 
Ed., Vol. 39, pp. 171-72). Mamontov's corps was routed in Oc- 
tober-November 1919. p. 279 



The note refers to the 21st Division redirected from the Eastern 
Front to reinforce the troops of the Southern Front. 

"Lashevich's godsons" — Mamontov's cavalry corps. 

"Sokolnikov's godson"— F. K. Mironov, who had raised a 
Don corps in the Saransk area and on August 23, 1919, organised 
a revolt against the Soviets. The revolt was quelled by S. M. Bu- 
dyonny's cavalry corps. p. 279 

On September 1, 1919, a general meeting of trade unions was held 
in Tashkent. After hearing Lenin's telegram, the meeting passed 
a resolution which stated: "...Red Tashkent, in the name of Red 
Turkestan, vows to fulfil all the assignments given us by the cen- 
tre, and the red banner, proudly unfurled over Turkestan, will not 
falter in the hands of Red Tashkent." (Iz istorii grazhdanskoi 
voiny v SSSR, Vol. 2, 1961, p. 737.) p. 280 



In his reply to Lenin on September 2, 1919, Stalin wired that 
on the day of Marchlewski's arrival to conduct negotiations with 
the Lithuanians, the latter suddenly launched an attack. Obvious- 
ly, the telegram pointed out, the Lithuanians had used talk about 
negotiations as a cover in order to lull the vigilance of the Soviet 
Government. Stalin stated that he had not received any decisions 
of the Central Committee about conducting negotiations. "Today," 
he wrote further, "our counter-offensive has begun. We have is- 
sued an order to Front Headquarters to heighten vigilance and 
not allow any envoys to pass the front line without its knowl- 
edge and consent." p. 281 

Written in reply to a telegram from Trotsky, Serebryakov and 
Lashevich of September 5, 1919, which in effect proposed alter- 
ing the previously adopted plan of struggle against Denikin. On 
September 6, 1919, after discussing the telegram, the Politbu- 
reau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) adopted a decision "to endorse the 
draft reply of the Commander-in-Chief and to wire that the 
Politbureau is surprised at this question being raised again". 
(Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 384.) p. 281 

Written on a covering letter dated September 12, 1919, from 
A. K. Paikes, Deputy People's Commissar for State Control, 
accompanying the report of K. F. Martinovich, Chief Controller 
of the Southern Front, concerning the evacuation of Southern 
Front Headquarters from the town of Kozlov. p. 283 



NOTES 



519 



278 Written in connection with a communication from the Smolny 
Staff Committee reporting numerous cases of abuses, embezzle- 
ment and peculation of money, food products and clothing col- 
lected for the Red Army. The Committee requested that an in- 
vestigating commission be appointed and the guilty persons 
brought to book. p. 283 

279 On September 11, 1919, the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
discussed the arrests of bourgeois intellectuals and directed 
F. E. Dzerzhinsky, N. I. Bukharin and L. B. Kamenev to have 
their cases reconsidered. p. 283 

280 At a joint meeting of the Politbureau and Orgbureau of the C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) on September 18, 1919, it was decided to cancel the 
decision about sending Serebryakov to Selivachov. p. 286 

281 In a letter to Lenin dated September 26, 1919, Chicherin asked 
that the question of a new peace proposal to the Entente should 
be discussed in the C.C., R.C.P.(B.). Chicherin wrote that an 
official proposal from the government could be addressed to the 
Entente, or Gorky could be asked to write a letter pointing out 
the Soviet Government's invariable readiness to sign peace. Lenin 
wrote on Chicherin's letter: "...Not in the name of the govern- 
ment Confine ourselves to Gorky's letter " (See present edi- 
tion, Vol. 42, p. 144.) ' p. 286 

282 This refers to A. S. Solovyov's memo on "Ukhta Oil" sent to 
Lenin on September 23, 1919. 

On this subject see also this volume, Document 14. p. 287 

283 The letter was written at the request of the Dutch Communist, 
S. Rutgers, who was sent by the Executive Committee of the 
Communist International to Holland to organise there the West- 
European Bureau of the Communist International. p. 291 

284 At a meeting of the Council of Defence on October 17, 1919, Lenin 
made a report on the subject of reviewing warrants and assign- 
ments for military property. The Council of Defence decided to 
refer this question to a commission consisting of S. D. Markov, 
A. I. Svidersky, A. I. Rykov and E. M. Sklyansky, with instruc- 
tions, "if agreement is reached", to present the decision for Lenin's 
signature by Monday, October 20. The Council of Defence discussed 
also the question of the search for property suitable for military 
purposes. On October 31, 1919, the Council of Defence endorsed 
a decision for the review of warrants and assignments for mili- 
tary property and a decision on the search for property suitable 
for military purposes. p. 292 

285 On October 15, 1919, the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
decided to direct the commission to discuss Regulations on a Com- 
mittee of Aid for the Wounded and submit them to the C.P.C. 
on behalf of the Central Committee. On October 28 the draft 
Regulations "On the Committee of Aid for Wounded and Sick 
Red Army Men" were examined at a sitting of the C.P.C. On Oc- 



520 



NOTES 



tober 29, the Regulations under this title were endorsed by the 
All-Russia C.E.C. and published in Izvestia No. 245, November 
1, 1919. p. 293 

286 Lenin is referring to the decision of the Council of Defence dated 
October 16, 1919. It contained a directive to defend Petrograd 
to the last drop of blood, without yielding an inch of ground 
and fighting in the streets. In his proposed plan of struggle against 
Yudenich's forces, Trotsky also spoke of the need to prepare 
for street fighting in the city. But, in issuing its main directive 
for holding Petrograd at all costs until the arrival of reinforce- 
ments, the Council of Defence allowed for street fighting only if 
the enemy succeeded in penetrating into the city, whereas Trotsky's 
argument was different. He asserted that "for purely military 
considerations" it would be advantageous to allow the enemy to 
break into Petrograd which should therefore be converted into "a 
big trap for the whiteguard troops". p. 294 

287 Written by Lenin on Smirnov's telegram which reported that 
"the morale in Siberia is a firm, Soviet one. By organising local 
forces, we shall cope with Kolchak; all that is needed are uniforms 



and cartridges. Yesterday we went over to the offensive along the 



whole front, and expect to reach the Ishim in three weeks" 



Further, mention was made of the desire of the Communists of the 
5th Army that the army be transferred to the Southern Front. 
Smirnov proposed that after the Ishim three divisions of this army 
should be transferred to the south. "If you provide uniforms for 
30,000," he wrote, "we shall immediately mobilise this number of 

soldiers in Chelyabinsk and the place to which we are going. Send 

only uniforms; we have and will have all the manpower" (under- 

linings by Lenin) (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 388). 

The document bears a note by Lenin asking that the telegram 
be returned to him. p. 295 

288 

The situation on the Southern Front becoming extremely acute, 
the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) and the Soviet Government demanded that 
the military command should first of all eliminate the white- 
guard forces which might co-operate closely with Denikin's army. 
The Urals White Cossack army of General Tolstov, being adjacent 
to the right flank of Denikin's front, was in a position to make 
contact with Denikin's forces. It operated in the North Caspian 
area and diverted to itself troops of the Turkestan Front as well as 
part of the forces of the 11th Army of the South-Eastern Front. 

p. 295 

289 In the spring of 1919 Denikin seized Daghestan, Chechen, Ossetia 
and other national areas of the Northern Caucasus. The mountain 
peoples responded with a holy war against the whiteguards. 
Bourgeois-nationalist elements tried to take the leadership of 
this insurrectionary movement into their hands. However, they 



NOTES 



521 



did not succeed in winning over the main mass of the mountain 
people. Under the leadership of the Caucasian Regional Com- 
mittee of the R.C.P.(B.), explanatory work was carried out 
among the insurgents on a large scale and Communist organisa- 
tions were formed among the partisan forces. The insurrectionary 
movement rapidly assumed a Bolshevik character. p. 296 

290 In accordance with the directive issued on October 17, 1919, by 
Commander-in-Chief S. S. Kamenev, a striking force under S. D. 
Kharlamov was organised in the Kolpino-Tosno area. This group 
was to deliver an attack against the enemy in the Krasnoye Selo- 
Gatchina direction. At the same time the command of the Western 
Front planned a general counter-offensive by the 7th and 15th ar- 
mies. The 7th Army was to continue the attack in the direction 
of Gatchina-Volosovo-Yamburg, and the 15th Army in the Pskov- 
Luga area. p. 297 

291 The Central Party Archives of the Institute of Marxism-Leninism of 
the C.C., C.P.S.U. contain an extract from a reconnaissance report 
of November 17, 1919, which states that in the vicinity of Disna 
fraternisation took place with Polish soldiers and the lower 
ranks of the Polish officers. The document bears a note by Lenin: 
"This is very important! Send copies to Comrade Trotsky for all 
members of the Politbureau." p. 298 

292 In a letter to Lenin dated October 22, 1919, Chicherin objected 
to Trotsky's proposal for starting a war against Estonia. He wrote 
that Yudenich would have to be pursued on Estonian territory 
only if he retreated there. Chicherin pointed out the need to do 
everything to avoid invading Estonia. p. 300 

293 Written on a report from Commander-in-Chief S. S. Kamenev 
asking that drafts of governmental directives on operational mat- 
ters should first be submitted for consideration to the Supreme 
Command. The document bears the following notes: "I agree. 
Only notice should be given not in the name of the Central Com- 
mittee, but in the name of the Chairman of the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the Republic. N. Krestinsky, L. Kamenev." 
"I agree with the request of the Commander-in-Chief. M. Kali- 
nin." p. 300 

294 In the autumn of 1919, I. Volny was summoned to Moscow and 
received by Lenin. During a two-hour conversation, as Bonch-Bru- 
yevich recounted later in his recollections, Lenin showed an interest 
in the writer's creative plans and questioned him about eve- 
rything he had seen. p. 301 

295 By a decision of the Central Committee of the Party, more than 
half the graduating class of Communist students of the Sverdlov 
University were sent to the front. On October 24, 1919, Lenin 
delivered a speech to the students of the University who were 
leaving for the front (see present edition, Vol. 30, pp. 76-84). p. 302 

296 Thig letter was written in connection with the departure for the 
front of Ivanovo-Voznesensk Communists who had been called 



522 



NOTES 



up. A meeting of the city Party organisation took place in Iva- 
novo-Voznesensk on October 3. It called on every member of the 
Party to devote himself to the cause of routing Denikin's army 
and instructed the Party organisations to begin mobilising Com- 
munists for the front. The first party of mobilised men were 
seen off to the front on October 22. On October 24, the mobi- 
lised Ivanovo-Voznesensk Communists arrived in Moscow. Lenin 
made a speech to them in the House of Trade Unions (see Col- 
lected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 39, p. 238). Fifty of the Ivanovo- 
Voznesensk Communists were sent to the Headquarters and the 
Political Department of the South-Eastern Front and the re- 
mainder to the 9th Army. p. 302 

297 In a telegram on October 24, 1919, the Chairman of the Pugachev 
Uyezd Food Conference reported that the surplus appropria- 
tion quota had been fulfilled 50 per cent, and in some volosts 
10.0 per cent. The telegram stated that the planned quota would 
be fulfilled before December 1, 1919. p. 303 

298 Written on a memo addressed to Lenin by the Business Manager 
of the Council of People's Commissars, V. D. Bonch-Bruyevich, 
who pointed out the urgent need for building public baths with 
disinfection chambers at Moscow's railway stations in order to 
combat an imminent epidemic of typhus. 

The document bears a note by Semashko: "Z. P. Solovyov. 
A commission should be set up ... to urgently consider the mat- 
ter. Dr. Levenson is instructed to take the initiative in conven- 
ing a conference." p. 304 

299 Simultaneously Lenin wrote a similar letter to Kotomkin, Food 
Commissar of Ufa Gubernia, and on December 11, 1919, wired 
Reske, agent of the Central Executive Committee in Ufa (with 
copies to Fotieva and Kotomkin): "Fotieva is not to leave before 
January 1st. Report fulfilment." {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 51, p. 391.) p. 305 

300 On November 6, 1919, the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
accepted the idea of the Red Army crossing the Estonian frontier 
to complete the rout of Yudenich's whiteguard forces. On 
November 14, however, this decision was rescinded at a meeting 
of the Politbureau which noted that under pressure from the work- 
ing population the Estonian Government was agreeing to 
resume peace negotiations and, apparently, would not support 
Yudenich. 

On December 5, 1919, a peace conference of the R.S.F.S.R. 
and Estonia opened in the town of Yuriev (Tartu), at which an 
agreement on the cessation of hostilities between the R.S.F.S.R. 
and Estonia was signed (December 31, 1919). On February 2, 
1920, a peace treaty between Soviet Russia and Estonia was con- 
cluded, p. 309 

301 On the back of this letter, I. I. Radchenko, Chairman of the Chief 
Peat Committee, wrote: "A report on the 1919 peat campaign 



NOTES 



523 



was sent to Lenin at 1 p.m. on November 11, 1919. On the same 
day, at 11 p.m., this comment on it was received." p. 310 

302 This telegram was written by decision of the Council of Defence, 
which dealt with the question of food supplies for the mining and 
metallurgical workers of the Urals at its sitting on November 
20, 1919. Later, on December 15, Lenin sent another telegram 
to the same destination: "...regarding the supply of food for the 
Urals workers, only once has a reply been received — on December 
15. Reports (how many poods are delivered) must be sent twice 
a month" (Lenin Miscellany XXXIV, p. 245). On January 
14, 1920, a telegram signed by Lenin and Rykov was sent to the 
R.M.C. of the Eastern Front, the Ufa Gubernia Food Commissar, 
the Commissar of the Samara-Zlatoust railway, and the Special 
Food Commissar of the 5th Army, pointing out the necessity 
of supplying food to all workers of the South Urals factories, 
mines and pits (see Lenin Miscellany XXXIV, p. 253). p. 311 

303 Lenin is referring to Weissbrot's telegram of November 20, 1919, 
reporting on the extremely grave situation created in Orenburg 
by the spread of a typhus epidemic. The absence of firewood and 
lack of medical personnel made it difficult to combat the epidemic. 
For the fight against typhus, Weissbrot pointed out, it was neces- 
sary to increase the number of hospital beds in Orenburg to five 
thousand and to transfer an additional two hospitals. p. 312 

304 Written in connection with a report from B. S. Weissbrot dated 
November 5, 1919, concerning the supply of doctors for the Red 
Army. Weissbrot pointed out that there was a surplus of doctors 
in the medical institutions of Moscow and urged the need to call 
up doctors and send them to the front. Lenin marked off the pas- 
sage in the report which said that some institutions, for instance, 
the clinics of the Second Moscow State University, had more 
doctors exempted than they had altogether before the imperialist 
war, and wrote "N.B." in the margin and a footnote saying: 
"Check this fact carefully and at once." On another page, where 
Weissbrot pointed to the existence in Moscow of unnecessary me- 
dical establishments, Lenin noted: "how many of them are 
there?" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 394.) p. 312 

305 Lenin proposed that a representative from Kiev Gubernia be 
included in the C.E.C. His proposal was adopted. K. Tolkachov 
was elected as the representative from Kiev Gubernia to the 
C.E.C. p. 314 

306 This note was written on a letter from S. M. Kirov and I. P. Bab- 
kin dated December 9, 1919, concerning the situation in the Cau- 
casus. The letter stated that there was no exact information 
whether Kamo had arrived in Baku. 

In the autumn of 1919, Kamo, at the head of a combat group, 
was sent secretly from Moscow with arms, munitions and litera- 
ture to carry out underground work in the Caucasus. Overcoming 



524 



NOTES 



all difficulties, the group arrived safely in Baku and joined in 
the struggle against the Denikinites. p. 314 

307 In a conversation by direct line with members of the Turkestan 
Commission, Frunze said: "The refusal to send top-level polit- 
ical workers is due to the big demands of the Southern Front and 

the Ukraine By our efforts we have succeeded in getting ... a 

few people for both the political and the technical jobs." 
(M. V. Frunze na frontakh grazhdanskoi voiny. Sbornik dokumentov, 
Moscow, 1941, p. 259.) p. 314 

308 This refers to the article "The Constituent Assembly Elections 
and the Dictatorship of the Proletariat" (see present edition, 
Vol. 30, pp. 253-75), which Lenin completed on December 16, 1919. 

p. 316 

309 This note was apparently written in connection with the discus- 
sion at a meeting of the Council of Defence on December 17, 
1919, of a report by L. B. Krasin: "On Drawing Up Forms of Acco- 
unting Enabling the Work of the Railways To Be Kept Under 
Review." The final decision on this question was put off until the 
next meeting; the Council of Defence instructed Y. V. Lomonosov, 
member of the Board of the Commissariat for Railways, to submit 
a report on the forms of accounting giving statistical data ("such 
forms", the decision stipulated, "must be briefer than those pres- 
ented by Comrade Krasin"). On December 24, the Council of 
Defence endorsed the programme of measures set forth by Lomo- 
nosov, and instructed the People's Commissariat for Railways 
"to present it tomorrow to Comrade Lenin for signature in the 
form of a series of decrees" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, 
p. 396). 

The document bears a note in an unknown hand: "Executed 
19.XII." p. 317 

310 In the autumn of 1919 a group of "federalists", headed by G. Lap- 
chinsky, P. Popov and Y. Lander, was formed in the Communist 
Party of the Ukraine. The group took a bourgeois nationalist 
stand and started factional splitting activities. On December 13, 
1919, the federalists called a meeting of 32 of their supporters 
at which they declared against the policy of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
towards the Ukraine. Popov and Lander signed a statement on 
behalf of 32 Ukrainian Party functionaries criticising the com- 
position of the Bureau of the C.C., C.P.(B.) of the Ukraine and 
its methods of work, and protesting against Party and administra- 
tive functionaries for the Ukraine being mobilised from Russian 
gubernias. 

On December 18, 1919, the Orgbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
examined the declaration of the Ukrainian Party functionaries 
and decided "to reprimand them because, instead of doing posi- 
tive work in accordance with the directive of the All-Ukraine Re- 
volutionary Committee and the Bureau of the C.C., C.P.(B.) of 
the Ukraine, they are wasting time and energy in gossip and ir- 



NOTES 



525 



responsible political chicanery, which is a violation of Party dis- 
cipline...." ' p. 317 

311 This refers to the appointment of P. N. Lepeshinsky to Tur- 
kestan, where he worked as Deputy People's Commissar for Edu- 
cation, p. 318 

312 On December 21, 1919, a letter signed by Lenin was sent also 
to the Party Committee and Executive Committee of Tula Gu- 
bernia. It stressed the need for sending not less than 400 truck- 
loads of potatoes to the Moscow working people within the next 
ten days. "On your achievements, energy and determination," 
the letter stated, "depend the salvation of the working class, the 
consolidation of the gains of the revolution, and its further suc- 
cesses and final triumph." (Lenin Miscellany XXIV, p. 146.) p. 319 

313 This note was apparently written in connection with a sitting 
of the Narrow Council of People's Commissars on December 18, 
1919, which discussed a request from the Moscow Gubernia Exec- 
utive Committee for the cancellation of a circular of the People's 
Commissariat for Internal Affairs on the use of church buildings 
for school purposes. The Narrow C.P.C. resolved to reject the 
request of the Moscow Gubernia Executive Committee, and to 
direct the People's Commissariats for Education, Justice and 
Internal Affairs to draft a relevant instruction and submit it 
to the Narrow C.P.C. by December 29, 1919. p. 320 

314 Written on a telegram sent from Ruzayevka by J. Kh. Peters, 
Chairman of the Special Committee for Introducing Martial Law 
on the Railways. It was received late in the evening on December 
25, 1919, and contained a proposal for recalling skilled workers 
of railway repair-shops and depots from the army, since locomotive 
repairs had decreased almost everywhere, and in some places 
dropped to a catastrophic minimum. 

At a meeting of the Council of Defence on December 31, after 
discussion of a draft decision put forward by L. B. Krasin "on 
withdrawing from the army skilled railway repair-shop men and 
workers", it was decided to regard the question as settled, in 
view of Krasin's statement that in practice it had already been 
solved. p. 321 

315 Written in reply to I. N. Smirnov's telegram addressed to Lenin 
reporting on the progress of work for dispatching coal from Kol- 
chugino and the Kuznetsk Basin. 

Lenin gave directives for the troops of the Red Army to guard 
the property left by Kolchak's retreating army at Omsk and 
along the railway line to Irkutsk. p. 322 

316 This refers to the meeting of the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
on December 27, 1919, which discussed the following: an inquiry 
by Chicherin whether he could send the Georgian Government a 
proposal for joint military operations against Denikin without 
recognising that government; a report by Chicherin that the 
Estonians agreed to give the military guarantees asked for on 



526 



NOTES 



condition of their being granted the right to construct fortifica- 
tions on the left bank of the Narova; a statement by Chicherin 
concerning the Petrograd branch of ROSTA, which had published 
a communication of a military nature that could be interpreted 
by the Entente and Finland as an intention on the part of Soviet 
Russia to launch an attack against Finland, and other ques- 
tions, p. 323 

317 The Central Collegium of Agitational Centres was established by 
a decision of the Council of Defence on May 13, 1919, for the pur- 
pose of organising centres of agitation and education at railway 
junctions and troop entrainment points. p. 323 

318 On the previous day, December 29, 1919, Lenin received 
Maria Movshovich in his office in the Kremlin. She had come 
to Moscow from the front because her husband had fallen ill with 
typhus and her daughter was left without anyone to look after 
her. Lenin talked to her about her work in the Red Army and the 
situation at the front. On the following day he visited her and 
promised his help in arranging her personal affairs. p. 323 

319 Written on a telegram from V. Yushin of Oshta village, Olonets 
Gubernia, who complained that the local authorities had requisi- 
tioned from him one of his three cows. Yushin pointed out that 
his family consisted of nine persons and his son was in the Red 
Army. Brichkina sent a copy of the telegram to Tsyurupa in the 
People's Commissariat for Food. p. 324 

320 Written on a telegram telephoned to Lenin by V. N. Yakovleva, 
a member of the Board of the People's Commissariat for Food, 
and received by C.P.C. secretary M. I. Glyasser on January 1, 
1920, at 4.25 p.m. It concerned information which had arrived 
on December 30 and 31 about the progress of the loading and 
dispatch of food trains to Moscow. Yakovleva reported also the 
absence of information from Kazan and Simbirsk, since the direct 
line was out of action on both December 30 and 31, and that in 
Samara the number of empties provided for food was considerably 
less than what was required. 

At a meeting of the Council of Defence on January 2, 1920, 

Lenin delivered a report on "Military Accountancy of the 

People's Commissariat for Posts and Telegraphs and the People's 

Commissariat for Railways". p. 324 

321 Die Freiheit — a daily newspaper, organ of the Independent So- 
cial-Democratic Party of Germany, published in Berlin from 
November 15, 1918, to September 30, 1922. p. 326 

322 Lenin is referring to the Extraordinary Congress of the Independ- 
ent Social-Democratic Party of Germany, held in Leipzig 
between November 30 and December 6, 1919. Under pressure 
from Left-wing members of the party, the Congress adopted a 
programme of action which supported the idea of the dictatorship 
of the proletariat and the system of Soviets. At the Congress, the 
proletarian wing of the party proposed "immediate and uncon- 



NOTES 



527 



ditional affiliation to the Third International". (See present 
edition, Vol. 31, p. 74.) p. 326 

The note to Svidersky was written on a letter to Lenin from the 
workers of the Balashinsk factory, who wrote: "We workers 
receive food, exclusively bread, at intervals of 5 to 14 days, and no 
other products. If potatoes are issued from the centre they stand 
for about a month on the railway line.... Comrade Lenin, we ask 
you to help us improve our position so that we can do better work 
for the good and prosperity of our revolutionary Russia." p. 327 

On January 5, 1920, Tsyurupa sent a letter to the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
in which he pointed out that the decision adopted by the Council 
of People's Commissars on January 3, 1920, permitting agencies 
of the Supreme Economic Council to purchase forage at free prices 
in cases where the State Control found it impossible for agencies 
of the People's Commissariat for Food to supply forage to S.E.C. 
enterprises, violated the principles of the Food Commissariat's 
food policy and did away with the forage procurement monopoly. 
He requested that the matter be discussed in the C.C., R.C.P.(B.). 

p. 328 

Written in reply to a telegram to Lenin from the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the 3rd Army on January 10, 1920, which 
proposed that the army be switched over to the work of restoring 
the national economy. On January 13, 1920, in its decision on 
Lenin's report concerning the organisation of the 1st Labour 
Army, the Council of People's Commissars welcomed the proposal 
of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 3rd Army. A commis- 
sion consisting of Lenin, Krasin, Rykov, Tomsky, Trotsky and 
Tsyurupa was set up to draft proposals for the most expedient 
ways of utilising the 3rd Army. By its decree of January 15, 
1920, the Council of Defence converted the 3rd Army into the 
1st Labour Army and set up a Revolutionary Council of the 1st 
Labour Army from among members of the Revolutionary Military 
Council, representatives of the People's Commissariats for Food, 
Agriculture, Railways, and Labour, and representatives of the 
Supreme Economic Council. On January 17 and 18, the question 
of using military units on the economic front was discussed in 
the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.). The Politbureau approved 
the decision of the Council of Defence to convert the 3rd Army 
into the 1st Labour Army and passed a decision calling for plans to 
be drawn up for the creation of Kuban-Grozny, Ukrainian, Kazan, 
and Petrograd Labour Armies. On January 21, 1920, the Council 
of People's Commissars of the R.S.F.S.R. by agreement with the 
All-Ukraine Revolutionary Committee passed a decision to form 
a Ukrainian Labour Army in the area of the South-Western Front. 
On February 10, the Council of Defence decreed that the 7th 
Army was to be renamed the Petrograd Revolutionary Army of 
Labour. At the end of January and beginning of February, the 
Reserve Army of the Republic and units of the 2nd Army were 
drawn into the work of economic construction, the troops of the 



528 



NOTES 



8th Army in March, and certain other military formations 
somewhat later. With the outbreak of the war against bourgeois- 
landowner Poland and Wrangel, the labour armies had to be 
switched back to battle readiness. p. 328 

326 On January 15, 1920, Tsyurupa communicated Lenin's instruc- 
tion to M. K. Vladimirov, Chairman of the Special Food Com- 
mission of the Southern Front, and asked him to report on the 
state of food work in the Don Region. p. 330 

327 Written on a report from P. N. Solonko concerning deposits of 
coal, pyrites and white sand for chinaware in the vicinity of 
Bryansk. "The area on which coal has been discovered," Solonko 
stated, "is approximately 40 versts square. With the present 
means and productivity of labour, the yield of coal could amount 
to about 3,500,000 poods annually, and if production is well 
organised ... the yield could be more than 10 million poods." Lenin 
wrote on the envelope containing Solonko's report: "From P. N. So- 
lonko on coal in the Maltsev area." 

On January 15, 1920, Lenin received from the Chief Coal 
Committee a memo giving information about the coal deposits 
near Bryansk. "I am sending you the present information," wrote 

A. Lomov. "One of our best coal geologists has promised to go 
to the site" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 403). p. 330 

328 At its meeting on January 17, 1920, the Council of People's Com- 
missars endorsed a decision for the collection of whiteguard liter- 
ature. The decision was published (in part) in Pravda and in 
Izvestia No. 15, January 24, 1920. p. 331 

329 The paragraph in Izvestia, entitled "A Wealth of Oil Products", 
stated that the oil fields near Berchogur, in the neighbourhood of 
Zhilaya Kosa, had available stocks amounting to 20 million 
poods of oil, 300,000 poods of paraffin and 200,000 poods of pet- 
rol. In addition, oil was gushing from four wells. p. 331 

330 Trotsky's telegram to Frunze, Commander of the Turkestan Front, 
gave directives for the deployment of the 4th Army, which had 
been converted into a labour army for the construction of the 
Alexandrov-Gai-Emba railway line and the reconstruction of the: 
Krasny Kut-Alexandrov-Gai line to a broad gauge. 

On January 19, Frunze signed an order for the construction 
of the Emba railway line by the 4th Army. p. 332 

331 In a telephone message on January 18, 1920, People's Commissar 
for Health N. A. Semashko reported that the troop train with 

B. S. Weissbrot's Sanitary Commission, which was sent to the 
Southern Front and the Ukraine to combat typhus, was proceeding 
very slowly. "I request," wrote Semashko, "1) an immediate 
order for the train to be speeded up, 2) special supervision over 
it, 3) investigation of the causes of delay and a trial of those to 
blame by a revolutionary tribunal." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 51, p. 404.) p. 333 



NOTES 



529 



In a note to Lenin, Kamenev protested against the decision of 
the Narrow Council of People's Commissars to close down the 
Nikitsky Theatre. Kamenev believed this question came within 
the competence of the local, and not the central, authorities, in 
this case the Moscow Department of Education. On January 20, 
1920, the Council of People's Commissars discussed the closure 
of the Nikitsky Theatre. It endorsed the decision of the Narrow 
Council and instructed it "to call in representatives of the Mos- 
cow Soviet in matters concerning Moscow". {Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 405.) p. 333 

Lenin's telegram was written in connection with the attempt 
by Bashkir bourgeois nationalists to carry out a coup d'etat in 
Bashkiria in January 1920. The bourgeois nationalist A.-Z. A. Va- 
lidov and a group of his followers who, under pressure from the 
working people, came over to the side of Soviets in February 1919, 
had not changed their views or abandoned their aim to secure 
bourgeois autonomy for Bashkiria. 

In the summer of 1919 the Validov group set up a "Provision- 
al Central Bureau of the Communists of Bashkiria" headed by 
Yumagulov, who was at the same time Chairman of the Revolu- 
tionary Committee organised by the Validov group. Validov's 
"Bureau" tried to assume leadership of the Party organisations 
of Bashkiria although it had not been endorsed by the Central 
Committee of the R.C.P.(B.). In January 1920, on the proposal 
of Validov's supporter, K. M. Rakai, the Bashkir Revolutionary 
Committee set up a Foreign Relations Department. When the 
Party Regional Committee on January 13, 1920, condemned this 
step and resolved to recall Rakai from the posts he held, the Chair- 
man of the Revolutionary Committee, Yumagulov, tried to carry 
out a coup d'etat. On the night of January 13, 1920, by his order 
the members of the Party Regional Committee and other Commu- 
nists were arrested, and a manifesto was issued accusing them 
of conspiring against the Bashkir Republic. 

The telegram of the C.E.C. of January 20, 1920, mentioned 
by Lenin, stated: "In view of the friction between the Bashkir 
Revolutionary Committee and the Ufa Gubernia Revolutionary 
Committee, and your accusation against Comrade Eltsin of deviat- 
ing from the policy of the central government, the C.E.C. by 
agreement with the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) sent to Sterlitamak Com- 
rades Artyom (Sergeyev), Preobrazhensky and Samoilov, who have 
no local Ufa interests and are incapable of pursuing a localist, 
chauvinist policy. The C.E.C. considers it improbable and quite 
out of the question that they could carry on agitation against 
the Bashkir Republic. The C.E.C. therefore orders you immediate- 
ly, upon Comrade Artyom's directives, to free all the arrested 
members of the Regional Committee and other Communists, to 
cancel your report of a conspiracy, and make known to the popu- 
lation and army units that the arrests were due to a misunder- 
standing." (Obrazovaniye Bashkirskoi ASSR. Sbornik dokumentov 
i matertalov, Ufa, 1959, p. 444.) 



530 



NOTES 



Shortly afterwards, Validov, Yumagulov and Rakai were 
recalled from Bashkiria and expelled from the Party. p. 333 

This refers to the stand taken by the Siberian Revolutionary 
Committee and the Revolutionary Military Council of the 5th 
Army in the talks which took place on January 19, 1920, with 
a delegation from the "Political Centre", which was formed from 
representatives of the Socialist-Revolutionaries, Mensheviks, Zem- 
stvo members and co-operators at an all-Siberia conference of 
Zemstvos and towns held in Irkutsk on November 12, 1919. When, 
on January 5, 1920, Irkutsk passed into the hands of the insurgent 
workers, soldiers and peasants, the "Political Centre" announced 
that it had assumed power in the city. The real organs of power 
in Irkutsk, however, were the headquarters of the armed workers' 
and peasants' detachments and the Military Revolutionary Com- 
mittee, which acted under the leadership of the Irkutsk Committee 
of the R.C.P.(B.). The question of doing away with the "Political 
Centre" was not raised at once, since it was trusted to some ex- 
tent by a section of the population and had the support of consid- 
erable forces of the interventionists in Irkutsk Gubernia and the 
Trans-Baikal area. The "Political Centre" aimed at the creation 
of a "democratic" bourgeois state in Eastern Siberia. At the talks 
with the Siberian Revolutionary Committee, its delegation pro- 
posed that the further advance eastward of the 5th Army should 
be halted and that a buffer state should be set up in Eastern Si- 
beria, but the Siberian Revolutionary Committee insisted on 
its own conditions, namely, that the Red Army advance to Baikal 
and a buffer state be organised in the Trans-Baikal area. 

Meanwhile the balance of forces in Irkutsk underwent a radical 
change, one which was not to the advantage of the "Political 
Centre". On January 21, 1920, all power in Irkutsk passed into 
the hands of the Revolutionary Committee. p. 334 

This refers to the troops of the Czechoslovak Corps, which in 
1918-19 were used by the Entente imperialists and the Russian 
whiteguards as a strike force against the Soviets, and now were 
retreating under the blows of the Red Army. On January 19, 
1920, the Czechoslovak Corps command announced that it was 
ceasing military operations and was ready to enter into negotia- 
tions for a truce with the Soviet army command. Soviet envoys 
went to Taishet railway station to present the terms for a truce 
but the White Czechoslovak command refused to negotiate. The 
truce was not signed until February 7. See also Note 72. p. 335 

Written on the back of Krestinsky's note to Lenin concerning 
the theses of a resolution on finance written by Y. Larin for the 
Third All-Russia Congress of Economic Councils (January 23-29, 
1920). "I regard them as impracticable and politically harm- 
ful," wrote Krestinsky. 

On January 23, in view of Larin's repeated statements con- 
flicting with the policy of the Party, the Politbureau of the C.C., 



NOTES 



531 



R.C.P.(B.) adopted a decision to remove him from the Board 
of the Supreme Economic Council. p. 335 

337 The questions raised in Yermakov's telegram were discussed in 
the Council of Defence on January 16 and 23, 1920. The decision 
quoted by Lenin was adopted by the Council on January 23. p. 336 

338 Written on a memo from G. V. Chicherin, People's Commissar 
for Foreign Affairs, reporting cases of violation of the decision 
of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) that all information on matters of foreign 
policy should first be submitted to censorship. Specific mention 
was made of an interview given by V. P. Zatonsky (see Vecherniye 
Izvestia No. 450, January 26, 1920). Lenin sent the document to 
the Russian Telegraph Agency (ROSTA) marked: "To be re- 
turned." On the same day, P. M. Kerzhentsev, the head of ROSTA, 
replied to Lenin that measures had been taken for all correspond- 
ence concerning foreign affairs to be sent to the People's Commis- 
sariat for Foreign Affairs for perusal. On the letter Lenin wrote: 
"To be kept in the dossier on ROSTA." On February 21, 1920, 
in connection with a letter from the People's Commissariat for 
Foreign Affairs about the irresponsible statement of a Moscow 
journalist speaking on the radio on questions of Soviet foreign 
policy, Lenin again wrote to Kerzhentsev: "Why was this not 
sent for censorship? Who is responsible?" (Lenin Miscellany 
XXXIV, p. 267.) p. 337 

339 This refers to G. M. Krzhizhanovsky's pamphlet The Main Tasks 
of the Electrification of Russia. Lenin sent the manuscript of the 
pamphlet directly to the printers to have it published in time 
for the first session of the C.E.C., 7th convocation. p. 337 

340 A. F. Shorin, constructor and inventor, who worked in the Nizhni- 
Novgorod Radio Laboratory, was arrested owing to a misunder- 
standing and quickly released. p. 338 

341 S. T. Kovylkin was at that time head of the South-Eastern Rail- 
way. M. M. Arzhanov, Chief of the Central Board of Military 
Communications of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 
Republic, was sent to Saratov to speed up the movement of troops 
to the Southern Front. p. 339 

342 In 1920, Y. 0. Bumazhny was Secretary of the Urals Bureau of 
the Central Committee of the Party; K. G. Maximov was Chair- 
man of the Supreme Economic Council's Industrial Bureau in 
the Urals and authorised agent of the Council of Labour and De- 
fence for the restoration of Urals industry. The friction between 
the Revolutionary Military Council of the Labour Army and 
departmental representatives was mainly over the question of 
the terms of reference of the Revolutionary Military Council. 
Lenin's telegram was apparently a reply to an inquiry about ways 
of settling the questions in dispute between the Revolutionary 
Military Council and the departments. p. 339 



532 



NOTES 



343 The article proposed that in order to improve food supplies for 
the workers, use should be made of suburban land plots for devel- 
oping collective market-gardening and livestock breeding, and 
for organising auxiliary farms. p. 341 

344 In the beginning of February 1920 preparations were made for 
a new offensive of the Red Army on the Caucasian Front. At the 
same time there was a lack of co-ordination between the armies 
of the front. The Mounted Army had been weakened in previous 
engagements; exhaustion of the troops and shortage of supplies 
were acutely felt. Owing to a relaxation of political and education- 
al work, instances of infringement of military discipline began 
to occur in the units. 

The Composite Cavalry Corps, which co-operated with the 
1st Mounted Army, was seriously affected. Counter-revolutionary 
elements were active at Corps Headquarters. On the night of 
February 2, Corps Commissar, V. N. Mikeladze, was murdered 
by counter-revolutionaries. All these circumstances in conjunc- 
tion with the extremely complex military situation caused Lenin 
great anxiety, since they jeopardised the Red Army's offensive 
in the Northern Caucasus, the aim of which was the final defeat 
of the enemy. p. 341 

345 This refers to the formation of the Far Eastern Republic 
as a buffer state. The F.E.R. was established in April 1920 
on the territory of the Trans-Baikal, Amur, Primorye, and 
Kamchatka regions and Northern Sakhalin. The formation of 
the F.E.R. — a state which, though bourgeois-democratic in form, 
carried out a Soviet policy — was in the interests of Soviet Russia, 
which sought to obtain a long respite on the Eastern Front and 
to avoid war with Japan. 

After the territories of the Far East (with the exception of 
Northern Sakhalin) had been cleared of interventionists and white- 
guards, the People's Assembly of the Far Eastern Republic 
on November 14, 1922, passed a decision to unite with the 
R.S.F.S.R. On November 15, 1922, the All-Russia C.E.C. an- 
nounced the incorporation of the Far Eastern Republic into the 
R.S.F.S.R. p. 342 



Stalin wired Lenin on February 18, 1920, that he disagreed with 
the order of the Commander-in-Chief to detach units of the Ukrain- 
ian Labour Army for reinforcing the front and asked to be sum- 
moned to Moscow to clear the matter up. On February 19, a tele- 
gram in reply signed by Lenin was sent to Stalin worded accord- 
ing to the text quoted in the present note. p. 342 



Written in reply to Stalin's telegram to Lenin saying: "I am 
not clear why the Caucasian Front is primarily my concern.... 
Reinforcement of the Caucasian Front is wholly the concern of 
the Revolutionary Military Council of the Republic, the members 
of which, according to my information, are in good health, and 



NOTES 



533 



not the concern of Stalin, who is overworked as it is." {Collected 
Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 409.) p. 343 

348 Lenin's telegram received in Saratov bears the note: "The first 
report of what has been done was sent to Lenin on 6/III." p. 346 

349 On the back of Lenin's letter is a memo by A. I. Svidersky giving 
information about the food supplied to the workers of the Lyubertsy 
factory. Over this Lenin wrote: "We shall verify this tomorrow 
by telephone and keep it in the files." p. 346 

350 Regarding this letter, Yaroslavsky wrote subsequently: "It was 
addressed to three comrades who were then members of the Perm 
Gubernia Committee. At that time the situation in Usolye was 
rather grave. Shortly before this, a new front — the Kai-Cherdyn 
Front — had been formed there. Remnants of Kolchak's forces and 
northern interventionists had organised bands in Cherdyn, where 
they had used the connections of the recently abolished Kolchak 
regime and exploited the dissatisfaction caused by the stupid 
bungling of some of the local Party officials who had antagonised 
the Zyryan people as well. As far as I remember, the Perm Gu- 
bernia Committee, on receiving Lenin's letter, sent a man to 
Usolye to ascertain the state of affairs on the spot, after which a 
commission was set up which reviewed the composition of the 
leading bodies and changed it at a specially convened Party con- 
ference." (Pravda No. 274, November 24, 1929.) p. 346 

351 This refers to the "Mandate to Comrade Vinogradov, delegate 
from the Second Vesyegonsk Uyezd Congress of workers engaged 
in education and socialist culture", which dealt with the grave 
material plight of the school staffs. On February 27, 1920, 
Vinogradov was received by Lenin. During their talk, which 
lasted 45 minutes, Lenin wrote the present letter. A favourable 
decision was reached in regard to improving the material position 
of the Vesyegonsk teachers. p. 348 

352 In the Central Party Archives of the Institute of Marxism-Lenin- 
ism of the C.C., C.P.S.U. there is a note of Lenin's to Alferov: 
"You promised information about the oil pipeline but did not 
give it!", and a reply from Alferov on the construction of the 
Emba oil pipeline marked "27. II. Alferov". 

The construction of the Emba pipeline was discussed at a 
meeting of the Council of Defence on March 5, 1920. The Council 
decided to instruct the Board of the Supreme Economic 
Council to examine the plan for the construction of the Emba pipe- 
line and submit it to the Council of People's Commissars in final 
form, and to ascertain whether an inquiry had been made abroad 
for ordering the pipes required. p. 349 

353 The Free Economic Society was founded in 1765, with the object, 
as laid down in its statutes, "of disseminating within the country 
information useful for agriculture and industry". The society 
carried out surveys by questionnaires and expeditions for stu- 
dying various branches of the economy and regions of the country. 



534 



NOTES 



It possessed a large library of some 200,000 volumes. After the 
October Revolution the library became part of the Saltykov- 
Shchedrin State Public Library in Leningrad. p. 349 

354 Written in connection with the election of the Mensheviks F. I. Dan 
and L. Martov to the Moscow Soviet of Workers' and Red Army 
Deputies. 

In the elections to the Moscow Soviet, which were held in 
the second half of February and early March 1920, 1,566 deputies 
were returned, including 1,316 Communists (84%), 52 Communist 
sympathisers (4%), and 46 Mensheviks (3%). p. 350 

355 George Lansbury, editor of the British newspaper The Daily 
Herald, visited Soviet Russia in February 1920. On February 
21 he was received by Lenin who had a detailed conversation 
with him, in particular on the attitude of the Bolsheviks to reli- 
gion. On returning to England, Lansbury sent Lenin a letter in 
which he wrote: "Many thanks to you and all your colleagues 
for the help you have given me in my try to understand your 
revolution." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 412.) p. 351 

356 N. N. Kuzmin, a member of the Revolutionary Military Council 
of the 6th Army, asked Lenin about the attitude to be adopted 
towards whiteguard officers who had laid down their arms and 
declared their readiness to work in Soviet Russia. p. 352 

357 This refers to a commission of the C.P.C. headed by G. I. Oppo- 
kov (A. Lomov) which was sent to Archangel to take measures 
to restore economic and political life in the northern areas of 
Soviet Russia that had been liberated from the whiteguards and 
interventionists, and to register and distribute the property 
seized there. p. 352 

358 This refers to valuable antiques, luxury articles and works of 
art that had been nationalised. In February 1919, Maxim Gorky 
set up a committee of experts in Petrograd to select and value 
these articles. Up to October 1, 1920, this committee, consisting 
of 80 persons, had selected, as Gorky wrote, "120,000 various 
articles" (V. I. Lenin i A. M. Gorky. Pisma, vospominaniya, 
dokumenty [V. I. Lenin and A. M. Gorky. Letters, Recollections, 
Documents], 1961, p. 164). This work, however, progressed 
extremely slowly. On Gorky's letter, Lenin wrote: "only 8 stores 
out of 33 have been gone through" (ibid.). p. 352 

359 Written in reply to Trotsky's telegram from Ekaterinburg dated 
March 5, 1920, in which he reported a considerable increase in 
food procurements in districts of the Urals and Siberia, complained 
that the central departments did not even reply to inquiries from 
the Siberian and Urals organisations, and asserted that only the 
establishment of regional centres with wide powers could put the 
work on a proper footing. On the text of the telegram Lenin wrote 
his remarks about the decision on Ishim Uyezd and the request 
that Brunovsky be kept for food work, and also about meat pro- 
curement in Siberia: "1) Remains in Tyumen Gubernia. 



NOTES 



535 



"2) No objection to Brunovsky (for the Food Commissariat) 
"3) The Food Commissariat has issued an order to organise 
salting centres." {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 413.) 

p. 353 

On March 8, 1920, the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) dis- 
cussed the question of the People's Commissar for Railways in 
view of the fact that Krasin was going abroad. It was decided: 
"That Comrade Lenin be asked to communicate with Comrade 
Trotsky" {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 413). On March 
20, the Politbureau adopted a decision to put through the Presid- 
ium of the C.E.C. and the Council of People's Commissars Trot- 
sky's appointment as Acting People's Commissar for Railways. 

p. 354 

Written in reply to a telegram from I. N. Smirnov, Chairman 
of the Siberian Revolutionary Committee, who reported that 
the Mensheviks and Socialist-Revolutionaries made it a condi- 
tion for their participation in the buffer state government (see 
Note 345) that no territories should be conceded in the Far East. 
Smirnov wrote: "Communicate your decision directly to Janson 
in Karakhan's code and to me at the Siberian Revolutionary 
Committee." On this telegram Lenin wrote the draft of a reply 
to Smirnov, on which there is a note: "Agreed. N. Krestinsky , 
L. Kamenev." At the same time, Lenin sent a telegram to Janson 
in Irkutsk: "The Mensheviks and Socialist-Revolutionaries must 
join the buffer state government without any conditions. If they 
do not submit to us without any conditions they will be arrested." 
{Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 413.) p. 354 

On March 10, 1920, Lenin received V. S. Smirnov (Malkov) 
and M. Z. Manuilsky, representatives of Ivanovo-Voznesensk 
Gubernia, and A. S. Kiselyov, a member of the C.E.C. (in the past 
a leading member of the Ivanovo-Voznesensk Party organisation). 
In accordance with a decision of the Gubernia Party Committee 
of March 6, they asked Lenin to increase the supply of food to 
Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia, to remove the intercepting detach- 
ments in Yuriev-Polsky Uyezd, Vladimir Gubernia, to include 
it in Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia and to provide Ivanovo- 
Voznesensk Gubernia at first open water with ships and barges 
for transporting foodstuffs, seed, etc. On the same day the Coun- 
cil of Defence discussed a report by A. B. Khalatov, a member 
of the Board of the People's Commissariat for Food, concerning 
the supply of food for Ivanovo-Voznesensk workers, and the ques- 
tion of joining Yuriev-Polsky Uyezd to Ivanovo-Voznesensk 
Gubernia. The Council of Defence resolved: "That the Chief Board 
of Water Transport be instructed to take urgent measures to supply 
the Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia Food Committee with tonnage 
to the amount of 400,000 poods for urgent delivery of seed potatoes 
from the Simbirsk, Kazan and Yaroslavl gubernias." {Collected 
Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 414.) p. 355 



536 



NOTES 



363 Written on a letter from J. Berzin to Lenin of March 11, 1920, 
reporting that the censorship of the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Affairs had let through a letter of the Menshevik Ab- 
ramovich addressed abroad to R. Hilferding, one of the opportun- 
ist leaders of German Social-Democracy. Berzin suggested that 
the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs should be purged 
of hostile elements. p. 356 

364 The Ukrainian petty-bourgeois nationalist Borotba Party arose in 
May 1918 after the split in the Ukrainian Socialist-Revolutionary 
Party. It got its name from the central organ of the party — the 
newspaper Borotba (Struggle). The Borotbists twice applied to 
the Executive Committee of the Communist International to be 
allowed to affiliate to the Communist International. On February 
26, 1920, the Communist International by a special decision 
called on the Borotbists to dissolve their party and merge with 
the C.P.(B.) of the Ukraine. 

Owing to the growing influence of the Bolsheviks among the 
mass of the peasants and the successes of Soviet power in the 
Ukraine, the Borotbists at their conference in the middle of March 
1920 were compelled to pass a decision to dissolve their party. 
A decision to admit the Borotbists to membership of the Ukrain- 
ian C.P.(B.) was adopted at the Fourth All-Ukraine Conference 
of the C.P.(B.)U., which took place from March 17 to 23, 1920. 

p. 357 

365 At its meeting on March 16, 1920, the Council of People's Commis- 
sars discussed the draft of a decree presented by L. B. Krasin 
enabling orders to be placed abroad for locomotives and spare 
parts for railway transport repairs. Three hundred million rubles 
in gold were earmarked for this purpose. Lenin's note was appar- 
ently written at this meeting. p. 358 

366 Lenin wrote this note on Krasin's letter concerning the purchase 
of locomotives from American trusts. Krasin wrote that there 
were only three trusts in the U.S.A. from which locomotives 
could be obtained. It was intended to start an immediate corres- 
pondence with them by radio from Scandinavia or London. Era- 
sin, however, expressed the fear that as a result of this publicity 
a "host" of middlemen would spring up between him and these 
trusts as the main suppliers, and that this would not only send 
the price up but also delay delivery. p. 358 

367 Lenin urged the need for intensified and uninterrupted work on 
locomotive repairs in view of the catastrophic state of railway 
transport, and this problem was repeatedly discussed by the 
Council of People's Commissars and the Council of Defence. Thus, 
on February 5, 1920, the C.P.C. heard a report by Krasin on spe- 
cial privileges for workers engaged in locomotive repairs and 
the production of spare parts for transport. On February 27, the 
Council of Defence discussed non-fulfilment by the People's Com- 
missariat for Food of the decree granting bonuses to workers who 
repaired trains in their spare time. On March 16, following a 



NOTES 



537 



report by G. N. Melnichansky (Chairman of the Moscow Gubernia 
Council of Trade Unions), the C.P.C. adopted a decision to organ- 
ise locomotive repair in the best workshops, where work would 
be carried on in three shifts round the clock. At the same meeting 
the Council discussed a number of other measures for improving 
the state of the railway transport. p. 358 

In a letter dated March 5, 1920, Maxim Gorky asked Lenin to keep 
the 1,800 rations for Petrograd scientists intact, to release 
from prison as soon as possible the well-known chemist 
A. V. Sapozhnikov, and to enable the physician I. I. Manukhin 
to carry out research on a vaccine against typhus (see V. I. Lenin 
i A. M. Gorky. Pisma, vospominaniya, dokumenty, Moscow, 1961, 



This note to Radek was written in connection with a report that 
Karl Liebknecht's wife was in an extremely agitated state, one 
reason for which was that relatives of hers, engineers living in 
Rostov, had been transferred to Berlin, about which she had 



This refers to the elections to the C.C., C.P.(B.) of the Ukraine 
at the Fourth Conference of the C.P.(B.)U. held in Kharkov from 
March 17 to 23, 1920. 

The work of the conference was marked by a bitter struggle 
of the Leninists against an oppositional group of Democratic 
Centralists headed by T. Sapronov, V. Boguslavsky, Y. Drob- 
nis, M. Farbman (Rafail) and others. During the elections to 
the Central Committee of the C.P.(B.)U. the Democratic Centra- 
lists succeeded by factional devices (voting by lists, etc.) in get- 
ting a majority of their supporters into the Central Committee 
and in sending their delegates to the Ninth Congress of the 
R.C.P.(B.). 

105 conference delegates who upheld the Leninist line refused 
to take part in the elections to the C.C. of the C.P.(B.)U. and 
denounced them as non-valid. Since the Central Committee elected 
by the conference did not reflect the will of the majority of the 
Ukrainian Communists, the C.C, R.C.P.(B.) decided it should 
be dissolved and replaced by a provisional C.C. of the C.P.(B.)U. 
consisting of V. P. Zatonsky, F. Y. Kon, S. V. Kosior. D. Z. Ma- 
nuilsky, G. I. Petrovsky, F. A. Sergeyev (Artyom), V. Y. Chu- 
bar, and others. In order to explain the measures taken to suppress 
the factional activity of the Democratic Centralists in the Ukraine, 
the C.C, R.C.P.(B.) on April 16, 1920, published an open letter 
addressed to all Party organisations in the Ukraine. This letter 
was approved by all the Party organisations of the Republic. 
To strengthen the Ukrainian Party organisations, the C.C, 
R.C.P.(B.) put a large group of experienced Party workers at 
the disposal of the C.C, C.P.(B.)U. In May 1920 alone, 674 Com- 
munists were sent to the Ukraine. By a decision of the C.C, 
R.C.P.(B.) of April 5, 1920, a re-registration of members of the 
Communist Party of the Ukraine was carried out. p. 360 



pp. 146-47). 



p. 359 



written to Lunacharsky. 



p. 360 



538 



NOTES 



371 V. P. Milyutin's report on the list of enterprises selected for Group 
I was made before the Council of People's Commissars on March 23, 
1920. On March 24, 1920, the list drawn up by the commission 
was submitted by the Council of People's Commissars to the All- 
Russia C.E.C. for endorsement. p. 361 

372 Written by Lenin following the systematic violations by the 
Turkestan Commission of the decision of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
prescribing that relations with Bukhara, Khiva, Persia and Afgha- 
nistan were to be controlled by the People's Commissariat for 
Foreign Affairs. By its decision of September 29, 1919, the Org- 
bureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) had charged the Turkestan Com- 
mission with the conduct of foreign relations in accordance with 
the instructions and under the control of the People's Commissar- 
iat for Foreign Affairs. The Turkestan Commission, however, 
did not carry out the instructions of the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Affairs. The latter demanded that G. I. Broido 
should be removed from leadership of the Department of Foreign 
Relations and that a department be set up consisting of A. N. Go- 
lub, A. A. Mashitsky, D. Y. Gopner and a representative of the 
Turkestan Central Executive Committee endorsed by the People's 
Commissariat for Foreign Affairs, but the Turkestan Commission 
refused to comply and appointed Heller head of the Department 
of Foreign Relations. 

By a decision of the Politbureau of the Central Committee 
of the R.C.P.(B.) on March 17, 1920, foreign policy functions 
were taken out of the hands of the Turkestan Commission, and 
the Department of Foreign Relations was made directly subor- 
dinate to the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs. But 
the Turkestan Commission objected to this. Golub, Mashitsky 
and Gopner were removed from office and forbidden to communi- 
cate with the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs. The 
inquiries of the Commissariat went unanswered. 

The last sentence in the manuscript was deleted and left out 
in the telegram. p. 362 

373 Written on a letter from V. V. Kosior, Chairman of the All-Ukraine 
Council of Trade Unions, who reported on the difficulties of 
work in the Donets Basin and big industrial centres of the south 
(Kharkov, Ekaterinoslav, Taganrog, etc.) due to lack of person- 
nel. To strengthen the work he proposed that some of the leading 
workers of Petrograd and Moscow should be transferred to the 
Donets Basin for restoring mines, pits, and metallurgical and 
processing factories. p. 363 

374 The town of Grozny was liberated by the Red Army on March 25, 
1920, at the same time as the town of Maikop. The oil wells were 
intact and in full working order. p. 363 

375 It has not been possible to establish what decision of the Organ- 
ising Bureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) this refers to. p. 364 

376 Uratadze — a representative of the Georgian Menshevik govern- 
ment, who had arrived in Rostov to go from there to Moscow for 



NOTES 



539 



diplomatic talks with the Soviet Government; he was detained 
in Rostov by order of the Revolutionary Military Council of 
the Caucasian Front, about which Lenin was informed by Orjoni- 
kidze. p. 367 

377 This refers to the All-Russia Extraordinary Commission's invest- 
igation into the case of a bogus co-operative organisation in 
Petrograd. In 1918, the former owners of a publishing house and 
print-shop, in order to prevent them from being nationalised, 
organised a bogus co-operative which obtained orders from 
various institutions by fraudulent means. The matter was in- 
vestigated by the Extraordinary Commission in accordance with 
Lenin's directive. The bogus co-operative was abolished. The 
print-shop was turned over to the Petrograd Economic Council 
and the publishing house to the Petrograd Branch of State Pub- 
lishers, p. 368 

378 The note was written in connection with a breach of labour dis- 
cipline by Lenin's chauffeur, S. K. Gil. p. 368 

379 Written in reply to a telegram of April 17, 1920, in which the 
Council of the 1st Labour Army asked that boundary changes 
should be stopped and that it be allowed to draft maps of the 
Urals and Cis-Urals gubernias and uyezds. On Lenin's motion 
this question was discussed by the Council of People's Commissars 
on April 20, 1920. In accordance with its decision, the present 
telegram was sent to the Council of the 1st Labour Army. 

The same meeting discussed a "Protest of the 1st Labour 
Army Concerning the New Division of the Tyumen and Chelya- 
binsk Gubernias". The C.P.C. adopted the decision quoted in the 
second telegram. p. 370 

380 rpj^g no t e was written on a letter from Professor S. P. Kostychev 
to Maxim Gorky about the work of the Plant Physiology Labora- 
tory of Petrograd University, which was of great scientific 
and practical interest. The letter gave a list of the most essential 
articles and materials, the lack of which was greatly impeding 
the work of the laboratory. On April 22, 1920, Gorky gave this 
letter to Lenin and asked him to arrange for Professor Kostychev 
to be supplied with the necessary materials. 

At the bottom of Lenin's note the People's Commissar for 
Health added the words: "I fully agree with Comrade Lenin's 
proposal and for my part ask that Comrade Gorky be given every 
assistance. N. Semashko." p. 370 

381 In his reply to Lenin, Rykov wrote that on the following day 
he would order the newspaper Ekonomicheskaya Zhizn to stop 
printing news about the loading and transportation of fuel, leav- 
ing only news of procurements. p. 371 

382 In the manuscript of the telegram, the word "details" has been 
crossed out and the words "the form of Vinnichenko's co-opera- 
tion in government activities" have been written in an unknown 
hand. 



540 



NOTES 



In the spring of 1920, V. K. Vinnichenko, who was then liv- 
ing as an emigrant in Vienna, declared that he was breaking 
his connections with the Ukrainian Mensheviks and accepting the 
platform of the Ukrainian Communist Party. Vinnichenko re- 
quested the Government of the R.S.F.S.R. to allow him to come 
to the Ukraine and to give him an opportunity of actively partici- 
pating in the struggle against the White Poles and Wrangel, as 
well as in building the Soviet Ukraine. 

In view of the fact that Vinnichenko and other nationalist 
leaders had the backing of a considerable number of Ukrainian 
emigres, and in order to win away from them elements belonging 
to the working people who had been misled, it was decided to 
draw Vinnichenko into Soviet work. The question was discussed 
several times in the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) and the C.C., C.P.(B.)U. 

On September 6, 1920, by a decision of the Politbureau of 
the C.C., C.P.(B.)U. Vinnichenko was admitted to membership 
of the Ukrainian Communist Party and appointed Deputy Chair- 
man of the Council of People's Commissars and People's Com- 
missar for Foreign Affairs of the Ukrainian S.S.R. On the same 
day the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) passed the following 
decision regarding Vinnichenko: "The Politbureau takes note of 
Comrade Vinnichenko's variable moods and therefore, while not 
objecting to his immediate admission into the Party, the Politi- 
cal Bureau proposes that he should not be given any post, and 
should first be tested in practical work." {Collected Works, Fifth 
Ed., Vol. 51, p. 424.) 

In October 1920 Vinnichenko again emigrated abroad. p. 372 

This note to Trotsky was written on Chicherin's letter to Lenin 
dated May 4, 1920, informing him about Lord Curzon's radio 
message. The message suggested a general amnesty and a concil- 
iatory attitude to the defeated whiteguards and spoke of a ces- 
sation of military operations in the Crimea and the Caucasus. 
In Chicherin's opinion, the proposal for direct talks with Wrangel 
with the participation of a British officer would be found distaste- 
ful by every real whiteguard and was a step towards practical 
recognition of Soviet Russia by Great Britain. Chicherin pro- 
posed "agreeing to an amnesty for Wrangel and to halting further 
penetration into the Caucasus, where we have already captured 
everything of importance, and we can reply by giving our consent 
without a moment's delay". p. 373 

Written on Y. A. Preobrazhensky's letter to Lenin suggesting 
that "a stop be put to the disgusting 'patriotism'", and mention- 
ing a speech of Radek's "about a 'national' war" and a chauvinist 
article by Bergman in Agitrosta. Preobrazhensky asked to 
be allowed to give appropriate directives to the editors of news- 
papers, especially provincial ones. To Preobrazhensky's request, 
Lenin answered: "I am wholly in favour", and he proposed the 
directive reproduced here. p. 373 

This was apparently written in reply to a telegram received from 
Orjonikidze and Kirov on May 7, 1920, reporting that Georgia 



NOTES 



541 



was undertaking a number of aggressive measures against Soviet 
Azerbaijan and that in the peace terms it was absolutely neces- 
sary to put forward a demand for the "proclamation of Soviet 
power in Georgia" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 426). 

p. 374 

386 The Propaganda Trains Department of the All-Russia C.E.C. 
sent a copy of this letter of Lenin's to the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) on 
June 12, 1920, with a request that the latter urgently appoint 
its representatives, the most experienced and leading instructors, 
for the train "Soviet Caucasus" and the steamship Red Star. 

p. 377 

387 Lenin is referring to the decision of the C.P.C. of May 27, 1920, 
on food resources, directing the Moscow and Petrograd Soviets 
"to give special attention to the need to increase the amount of 
market-garden products obtained from the environs of the capi- 
tals this year and to submit to the C.P.C. within a fortnight their 
proposals for possible measures". (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 51, p. 427.) p. 377 

388 The telegram from the R.M.C. of the Caucasian Front (received 
by the R.M.C. of the Republic on May 27, 1920) raised the ques- 
tion of releasing captive Cossacks — privates and NCO's of the 
Kuban White army — from P.O.W. camps and sending them 
home; the officers, it was proposed, were to be put at the disposal 
of Front Headquarters. p. 378 

389 On June 11, 1920, G. V. Chicherin, People's Commissar for For- 
eign Affairs, sent a Soviet Government Note to the British Gov- 
ernment addressed to the Foreign Secretary Lord Curzon, con- 
taining facts about the aid given by the British Government 
to the whiteguard General Wrangel. The Note stated that Wran- 
gel himself, in an army order issued on May 6, "openly and explic- 
itly mentions the diplomatic intervention of Great Britain on 
his behalf as a means of keeping his hold on the Crimea and mount- 
ing a new attack against Soviet Russia". This Note was published 
on June 13, 1920, in Izvestia No. 127. On this subject, see also 
Lenin's letter to Chicherin of June 11, 1920 (see this volume, 
Document 609). p. 378 

390 This refers to the decision of the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
of May 4, 1920, suspending military operations in the Crimea and 
the Caucasus. See also this volume, Document 583. p. 380 

391 Lenin is referring to the "Statute on the Commission of the Coun- 
cil of People's Commissars (the Narrow Council of People's Com- 
missars)" endorsed by the Council of People's Commissars on 
June 1, 1920. Lenin's addendum relates to the first four points 
of the "Statute", which state that "the purpose of the Narrow 
Council of People's Commissars is to work up questions which 
have to be dealt with by the Council of People's Commissars and 
require preliminary treatment. The destination of business reach- 
ing the Council of People's Commissars is decided by the Nar- 



542 



NOTES 



row Council, except for budgetary business, which must be handled 
by the Narrow Council, and matters coming before the Narrow 
Council by decision of the Council of People's Commissars". 
{Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 428.) 

The document bears the following names of C.P.C. members 
in the secretary's handwriting, who, on being questioned, ex- 
pressed their agreement with Lenin's addendum: Vladimirsky 
Avanesov, Kursky, Kamenev, Semashko, Milyutin, Pokrovsky, 
Nikolayev, Sereda, Krestinsky, Sklyansky. p. 380 

392 Written on a telegram to Lenin dated June 1, 1920, from Z. N. Dos- 
ser, Chairman of the Chief Oil Committee, and A. P. Serebrovsky, 
Chairman of the Azerbaijan Oil Committee. The telegram reported 
the grave food situation among the workers of the Baku oil industry 
owing to the fact that A. Y. Belenky, Special Food Commissar 
failed to fulfil obligations in regard to the dispatch of food from 
the Northern Caucasus to Baku, while at the same time refusing 
to allow the oil workers to make their own food procurements in 
the Northern Caucasus. p. 380 

393 The margin of the typewritten copy of this telegram in the Central 
Party Archives of the Institute of Marxism-Leninism contains a 
note by Orjonikidze: "The telegram was received by me in the 
summer of 1920. Orjonikidze." What Lenin's inquiry referred 
to has not been established. p. 381 

394 Written on Stalin's telegram to Lenin dated June 3, 1920, pro- 
posing either to sign a truce with Wrangel and enable one or two 
divisions to be taken from the Crimean Front, or to abandon all 
talks with Wrangel, strike a blow at him and, by routing him, 
release forces for the Polish front. p. 381 

395 Written on Stalin's telegram from Kremenchug dated June 4, 
1920, and apparently received by Lenin during a sitting of the 
Council of Labour and Defence. The telegram reported General 
Wrangel's intention to attack with one group of troops in the 
Alyoshki-Kherson area, and to land another group in the Odessa 
area so as to envelop it from two sides. 

On receiving Trotsky's note saying that Stalin had violated 
the established rules by addressing himself directly to Lenin 
(since such information should have been sent to the Commander- 
in-Chief by A. I. Yegorov, commander of the forces on the South- 
western Front), Lenin sent the second note to Trotsky. p. 383 

396 Lenin's exchange of notes with Alferov took place at a meeting 
of the Council of Labour and Defence on June 4, 1920, at which 
Takhtamyshev was present. p. 383 

397 Lenin is referring to the experiments of S. I. Botin, who was 
working on the problem of induced detonation by electromagnetic 
waves. In October 1921 a commission of experts recommended 
that the experiments should be discontinued owing to their 
insufficient preparation. p. 384 



NOTES 



543 



398 Written on a telegram to Chicherin from Krasin, Chairman of 
the Russian Trade Delegation in London, who reported that on 
June 10, 1920, he had had a visit from Wise, who stated officially, 
on behalf of Lloyd George, that the offensive begun by Wrangel 
was undertaken against the wishes of the British Government. 

The Soviet Government's Note in reply to the British Govern- 
ment, which was worded according to Lenin's directive and sent 
by radio on June 11, stated: "True, at the present time it is Wran- 
gel with his whiteguards, and not a British general, who is attack- 
ing Russia anew, but the weapons and ammunition which he 
uses were supplied to him by the British Government and other 
Allied Governments- his strategic movements have taken place 
under the protection of British and other Allied vessels, he has 
received the coal he needed from Great Britain, and the Allied 
fleet partly helped him in his landing operations and partly di- 
rectly participated in them. The Russian Government, therefore, 
cannot share the point of view of the British Government that 
the latter bears no responsibility for this new attack on Soviet 
Russia." (Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR, Vol. II, 1958, 
p. 567.) p. 386 

399 On June 11, 1920, after hearing the report of a commission on 
measures for ensuring the maximum deliveries of fuel, especially 
for Moscow, the Council of Labour and Defence resolved: "To make 
the Moscow Fuel Board and the People's Commissariat for Rail- 
ways responsible for transporting within three weeks all the fire- 
wood lying at railway stations within a 30-verst radius of Mos- 
cow, to the amount of about 8,000 cubic sazhens." (Lenin Miscel- 
lany XXXIV, p. 321.) p. 387 

400 Tijjg no t e was written in connection with the preparations for 
the Second Congress of the Communist International. Heller, 
who was appointed a representative of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) in 
the Italian delegation, was directed by the Politbureau of 
the C.C. "to collect passages in the Italian press against 
Turati and other reformists, and in general to select all the 
necessary material" for exposing reformism in the ranks of the 
Italian Socialist Party (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, 
p. 431). 

Avanti! — a daily newspaper, the central organ of the Italian 
Socialist Party, founded in Rome in December 1896. During the 
First World War, the newspaper adopted an inconsistent interna- 
tionalist position, without breaking its ties with the reformists. 
In 1926 the paper was closed down by Mussolini's fascist govern- 
ment, but continued to be published abroad; in 1943 its publica- 
tion was resumed in Italy. 

Comunismo — a fortnightly journal of the Italian Socialist 
Party; it was published in Milan from 1919 to 1922, edited by 
D. M. Serrati. 

II Soviet— a newspaper of the Italian Socialist Party, pub- 
lished in Naples from 1918 to 1922. From 1920 it was the organ 



544 



NOTES 



of the Communist-abstentionist faction of the Italian Socialist 
Party. p. 387 

401 This refers to the Bologna Congress of the Italian Socialist Party, 
held in October 1919. The Congress decided for affiliation of the 
Italian Socialist Party to the Communist International. p. 388 

402 The instruction was written on a telegram dated June 18, 1920, 
from the North Caucasus Branch of the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Trade setting forth the terms of a draft agreement 
between the Branch and representatives of the American corpora- 
tion. On the telegram are markings and underlinings made 
by Lenin. p. 389 

403 The letter to Merezhin, a member of the Central Bureau of 
Jewish Sections under the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), was written by Lenin 
in connection with the preparation of draft theses on the national 
and colonial questions for the Second Congress of the Communist 
International. 

The "information of Rafes" refers apparently to a letter 
of M. G. Rafes, "Defence of the rights of national minorities in 
regions with a mixed population (an assessment of the experience 
of Ukrainian-Jewish and Polish-Jewish relations)", sent by him 
to Lenin on June 21, 1920. p. 390 

404 On Lenin's letter there is a note by the People's Commissar for 
Agriculture: "A corresponding directive has already been sent 
by me to the Gubernia Land Department. S. Sereda." p. 391 

405 On June 14, 1920, Lenin imposed a penalty on E. Y. Vever, 
Manager of the Gorki Sanatorium — a month's arrest — for cutting 
down a perfectly sound spruce in the sanatorium park. The 
Podolsk Uyezd Executive Committee was charged with the car- 
rying out of this sentence (see Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 41, p. 151). p. 391 

406 Written on a letter from Chicherin dated June 23, 1920, complain- 
ing of the non-fulfilment of decisions of the Politbureau of the 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.) on matters concerning the People's Commissar- 
iat for Foreign Affairs. Despite repeated decisions of the Party's 
Central Committee, Chicherin wrote, nothing had been done, 
either in regard to rations, or to the transfer of a new building 
to the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs, or to the pro- 
vision of motorcars for foreign delegations and other needs of 
the Commissariat. p. 391 

407 Lenin thought highly of the great Russian physiologist, Aca- 
demician I. P. Pavlov, the founder of the materialist theory of 
higher nervous activity in animals and man. Lenin took a solici- 
tous interest in his well-being and gave him every possible assist- 
ance and support 

In view of Pavlov's outstanding scientific services, which 
were of tremendous importance for the working people of the 



NOTES 



545 



world, the Soviet Government, on the initiative of Lenin, in the 
hard years of economic dislocation and the immense difficulties 
resulting from the Civil War and foreign armed intervention, 
passed a special decree creating facilities that would enable Aca- 
demician Pavlov and his assistants to effectively carry on their 
scientific work (see present edition, Vol. 32, p. 69). 

In his well-known letter to Soviet youth written shortly be- 
fore his death, Pavlov touched on the immense opportunities 
which the Soviet socialist system offered for the development 
of culture and science. "Our country," he wrote, "is affording 
great scope to scientists and — it must be owned — science in our 
country is being fostered with a generous hand. A most lavish 
hand! 

"What is there to say about the status of our young scientist? 
Here surely everything is quite clear. Much is given to him, but 
much is expected from him. For the youth, as for us, it is a point 
of honour to justify the great trust that our country puts in 
science." (Pravda No. 58, February 28, 1936.) p. 392 

408 Written on a telephone message to the Council of People's Com- 
missars from D. A. Trilisser, secretary of the Petrograd Executive 
Committee, who asked for a postponement in presenting data 
on the development of suburban farms and on the stocktaking 
and confiscation of surplus produce from the market gardeners. 
On Lenin's motion, the Council of People's Commissars on June 
29, 1920, censured the Petrograd Soviet for "its impermissible 
procrastination in this matter". (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 51, p. 434.) p. 393 

409 This refers to S. I. Botin and his experiments for discovering a 
method of induced detonation by means of electromagnetic waves 
(see Note 397). p. 394 

410 The extract mentioned by Lenin stated: "...the Food Depart- 
ment of the Moscow Soviet of Workers' and Red Army Deputies 
has announced a competition for thermos vessels of large and 
small dimensions. Three prizes will be awarded: for apparatus 
of half a vedro*— 10,000 rubles, 5,000 rubles and 3,000 rubles- 
for blueprints of apparatus of five vedros — 5,000 rubles and 3,000 
rubles. Apparatus and blueprints must be presented by October 
20, 1918" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 434). 

In a memorandum presented to Lenin on July 16, 1920, the 
Board of the Moscow Consumers' Society reported that the com- 
petition for thermos vessels ended on October 1, 1918. Simulta- 
neously with the work of the Competition Commission, the Food 
Department began to use thermos vessels made entirely of wood 
(plywood and shavings). These vessels were very light — about 
32 lbs. for vessels of three vedros^ and enabled food to be kept 
hot for 18-20 hours. p. 393 



'1 vedro = 21 pints.— Ed. 



546 



NOTES 



411 Lenin is referring to a decision of the Politbureau of the C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) dated June 29, 1920, for convening a congress of peo- 
ples of the East in Baku. The decision stated: "Comrade Orjoni- 
kidze and Comrade Stasova, together with comrades co-opted by 
them, are instructed to form a bureau for convening a congress 
of peoples of the East in Baku. Comrade Zinoviev is to inform 
Orjonikidze about this today by direct line." {Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 435.) 

In stating that G. K. Orjonikidze retains "all rights and 
powers", Lenin is referring to the decisions of the Politbureau of 
the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) of June 29 and 30, 1920, appointing Orjoni- 
kidze a member of the Caucasian Council of the Labour Army 
from the Revolutionary Military Council of the Caucasian Front. 

p. 395 

412 Lenin is referring to a decision of the Politbureau of the C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) dated June 18, 1920, regarding the Northern Caucasus, 
which stated: "The Orgbureau is instructed to come to an agree- 
ment with the Caucasian Bureau of the C.C. for selecting from 
the members of the latter a small, permanently acting collegium... 
with the area of activities throughout the Caucasus. If Comrade 
Orjonikidze does not become a member of the small collegium, 
all questions relating to Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Turkey 
etc., must be decided in his presence" (Collected Works, Fifth 
Ed., Vol. 51, p. 435). p. 396 

413 In reply to Lenin's note, Krasin reported on the measures taken 
for the speediest shipment of goods intended for foreign trade 
and on their sale and the use of the foreign currency proceeds 
for the purchase of goods needed by Soviet Russia. p. 396 

414 This refers to the Second Congress of the Communist International, 
which was held from July 19 to August 7, 1920. 

All the preparatory work for convening the Congress was 
directed by Lenin. He wrote the theses on the national and colo- 
nial questions, on the agrarian question, on the fundamental 
tasks of the Second Congress of the Communist International, on 
the terms of admission into the Communist International, and 
the plan of theses on the international and economic situation 
(see present edition, Vol. 31, pp. 144-64, 184-201, 206-11, 212; 
Vol. 35, pp. 450-51). 

At the Congress, Lenin delivered a report on the international 
situation and the fundamental tasks of the Communist Interna- 
tional, made a speech on the role of the Communist Party, deliv- 
ered the report of the Commission on the National and Colonial 
Questions, and spoke on the terms of admission into the Commu- 
nist International, on parliamentarism, and on affiliation to the 
British Labour Party (see present edition, Vol. 31, pp. 215-63). 
Lenin's theses were endorsed as decisions of the Congress, p. 397 

415 To Lenin's question in the first note as to whom to entrust the 
translation of this book, Zinoviev replied that the book had al- 



NOTES 



547 



ready been translated into German and French in Petrograd and 
was being edited. 

Lenin wrote the new preface to the book on July 6, 1920, and 
it was first published in October 1921, under the title "Imperial- 
ism and Capitalism", in the journal The Communist Internation- 
al No. 18 (see present edition, Vol. 22, pp. 189-94). In Lenin's 
lifetime, separate editions of his book Imperialism, the Highest 
Stage of Capitalism were published in German in 1921, and in 
French and English (incompletely) in 1923. 

Lenin's third note was a reply to a passage in Zinoviev's note 
saying, "There is some difficulty with the quotations (from Ger- 
man and English publications)" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 



In speaking of Wijnkoop's statement, Lenin is referring to the 
letter from him of June 30, 1920, about the book "Left-Wing" Com- 
munism — an Infantile Disorder, with which the Dutch delegation 
became acquainted at the Second Congress of the Communist 
International before translations of the Russian text had been 
published. Wijnkoop's letter and Lenin's reply to it were first 
published in the English translation of the book, issued in Mos- 
cow in 1920, and in the Russian text of the book in 1930 in the 
second edition of Lenin's Collected Works (see present edition, 
Vol. 31, pp. 117-18). p. 400 

Written in connection with a letter from the Cinema Department 
of the People's Commissariat for Education, which reported that 
the fulfilment of Lenin's directive — for making a motion picture of 
"The Trial of the Kolchak Ministers" — was being held up owing 
to the absence of film. 

Lenin sent similar letters to Centrosoyuz, the Moscow Extra- 
ordinary Commission, the People's Commissariat for Military 
Affairs and the Vecheka. On July 9 a reply was received from the 
Vecheka addressed to the secretary of the Council of People's 
Commissars, Lydia Fotieva, reading: "Dear Comrade Fotieva, 
please tell Vladimir Ilyich that there is no cinema film in the 
Vecheka, other than shot films of a counter-revolutionary nature 
which cannot be used. Apparently, someone who did not know 
the facts has misled Ilyich" (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, 
pp. 437-38). p. 400 

This refers to the London negotiations between the Russian Trade 
Delegation, headed by L. B. Krasin, and members of the British 
Government (see Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR, Vol. II, 
Moscow, 1958, pp. 695-705). p. 401 

This refers to Kamenev's letter of July 9, 1920, concerning the 
nature of the Anglo-Russian talks, in which he wrote that politi- 
cal negotiations should be conducted "on the broadest agitational 
lines" recounting "widely and publicly the whole history of the 
intervention, including Kolchak, Denikin, Poland, Wrangel, 



Vol. 51, p. 437). 
See Note 414. 



p. 398 
p. 398 



548 



NOTES 



Lithuania, Estonia, etc., etc., and touching on and raising all 
the questions of Eastern policy from Turkey to China". In his 
postscript to this letter Chicherin supported Kamenev, who in 
turn again put forward the proposal — "without breaking off the 
negotiations, and in a mild tone, to present to Lloyd George the 
history of British plundering on a world scale". When Lenin read 
the letter, he wrote on it: "I disagree in principle. 10/VII. Lenin." 
(Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 438.) 

Lenin's letter was a reply to these proposals. p. 401 

421 N. N. Krestinsky, Secretary of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), informed 
Lenin on July 11, 1920, that Chicherin was insisting that Kame- 
nev and not Krasin should head the Soviet delegation that 
was being sent to Great Britain. Lenin wrote on Krestinsky's 
letter: "I agree to Kamenev as chairman, Krasin — deputy chair- 
man." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 438). p. 401 

422 This refers to a letter from Stalin dated July 11, 1920, informing 
Lenin of the promise of the Commander-in-Chief, S. S. Kamenev, 
to strengthen the Crimean direction with a number of military 
units and formations and combat materiel. 

On July 15 E. M. Sklyansky sent Lenin a memorandum on 
the amount of assistance to the South-Western Front. p. 402 

423 This refers to a Note from Lord Curzon, British Foreign Secretary, 
sent to the Soviet Government on July 11, 1920, from Spa (Bel- 
gium), where a conference of the Entente countries was being 
held together with representatives of Germany. To the decisions 
adopted at the Spa conference, Lord Curzon added a proposal 
that the Soviet Government should conclude an armistice with 
General Wrangel. p. 403 

424 This refers to the reply to Lord Curzon's Note of July 11, 1920, 
which was discussed at a plenary meeting of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
on July 16, 1920. The reply was published in Izvestia No. 157, 
July 18, 1920. p. 403 

425 This note was written on the draft of a decree for centralising 
libraries in the Republic, adopted by the Narrow Council of Peo- 
ple's Commissars on June 22, 1920. To eliminate duplication 
of work and ensure effective use and proper distribution of all 
existing book-collections, the draft stipulated that "the libraries 
of all public organisations and institutions are to be merged in 
the general library network of the Educational Departments". 
All libraries newly opened by public organisations were to be in- 
cluded "in the general network of public libraries". 

The draft decree also bears a note from Krupskaya to the 
People's Commissariat for Education: "If you will send me my 
article on the centralisation of libraries and return this draft, 
I will try to make a new draft and write an instruction. But per- 
haps it has already been done? In that case, send it as well." p. 404 

426 This telegram was written in reply to the following telegram 
from Stalin, sent on August 2, 1920, from Lozovaya: "Fierce 



NOTES 



549 



fighting is continuing with growing intensity; today we shall 
probably lose Alexandrovsk. I received your note concerning 
the separation of the fronts. The Politbureau ought not to con- 
cern itself with trifles. I can go on working at the front for two 
weeks at the most, I need a rest, find someone to replace me. I do 
not believe the promises of the Commander-in-Chief for a single 
minute, by his promises he only lets us down. As regards the 
sentiments of the Central Committee in favour of peace with 
Poland, one cannot help remarking that our diplomacy sometimes 
very successfully torpedoes the results of our military successes" 
{Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 441). p. 408 

427 This refers to Poland's Eastern frontier, which was arbitrarily 
fixed by the Supreme Council of the Entente at the end of the 
1914-18 imperialist war, on December 8, 1919. This frontier was 
to run along the line: Grodno — Yalovka — Nemirov — Brest-Litovsk 
— Dorogusk — Ustilug — Krylov, and was to cut across Galicia 
between Przemysl and Rava-Russkaya up to the Carpathian Moun- 
tains. This line was mentioned also in Lord Curzon's Note of 
July 11, 1920, and became known as the "Curzon Line". 

The Soviet Government, in proposing peace to Poland, was 
ready to accept as the Polish-Soviet frontier a line east of the 
"Curzon Line". 

The present note is Lenin's directive to the chairman of the 
Soviet delegation sent to London for negotiations with the British 
Government. p. 409 

428 In a telegram of August 13, 1920, in reply to Lenin, the Deputy 
Chairman of the Council of the Caucasian Labour Army, A. G. Be- 
loborodov, wrote: "Your telegram No. 402 received only 13th at 
20.00 hours. The Northern Caucasus, with the exception of the 
Kuban, for the time being gives no cause for anxiety as regards 

the outbreak of insurrections " {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 

Vol. 51, p. 444.) p. 412 

429 Lenin wrote this note on August 11, 1920, during his reception of 
Lao Hsiu-chao, a member of the Chinese Socialist Party and 
Chairman of the Central Executive Committee of the Union of 
Chinese Workers in Russia. On the back of the note is Krestin- 
sky's reply: "Tomorrow at 3.30." p. 413 

430 This note was written on a letter dated August 11, 1920, addressed 
to the Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars, V. I. Le- 
nin, from I. Brikhnichev, head of the All-Russia Extraordinary 
Commission for Abolishing Illiteracy. It asked for cadres to 
strengthen the commission, premises for the work, means of 
transport, and food rations. Point "b" of the letter read: "Peo- 
ple are needed, some 10-15 skilled and unskilled staff workers. Can 
be summoned from the localities or mobilised in Moscow." p. 413 

431 This refers to a collection of the decrees in force in 1919. In a 
letter in reply, Kursky reported that this collection was published 
under the editorship of Kozlovsky and was a reprint of Sobraniye 



550 



NOTES 



uzakonenii za 1919 god (Collected Legislation of 1919), and that 
another collection of the most important decrees of the R.S.F.S.R. 
during the three years, 1917-20, was being prepared for the press. 
On the envelope of Kursky's letter, Lenin wrote: "For the 



archives (VIII. 1920). Re publication of laws " (Collected 



Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 444). p. 414 

432 Written in connection with a letter from A. N. Voznesensky, 
formerly head of the Eastern Department of the People's Com- 
missariat for Foreign Affairs, who considered that he had been 
wrongfully dismissed. The matter was discussed on August 19, 
1920, at the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), which directed 
Chicherin to use Voznesensky in one of the subcommissions of 
the People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs as a specialist 
on the eastern question having a knowledge of Eastern languages 
and English. p. 414 

433 This refers to the conference for ending the war and establish- 
ing peaceful friendly relations between the R.S.F.S.R. and 
the Ukraine, on the one hand, and Poland, on the other. De- 
spite all the attempts of the imperialists to prevent it, the peace 
conference began its work on August 17, 1920, in Minsk, where it 
continued until September 3. On September 21, the conference 
resumed its work in Riga. The peace negotiations ended with the 
signing in Riga on October 12, 1920, of "A Treaty on an Armistice 
and Preliminary Conditions of Peace" between Soviet Russia and 
the Soviet Ukraine, on the one hand, and Poland, on the other 
(see Dokumenty vneshnei politiki SSSR, Vol. Ill, Moscow, 1959, 
pp. 245-58). p. 415 

434 See Note 427. p. 415 

435 This refers to a decision of the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
dated August 19, 1920, following the reports by Stalin and Trotsky 
on the military situation on the Polish and Wrangel fronts. In the 
decision it was recorded: "a) To recognise the Wrangel front as 

the main front b) To convene the Orgbureau tomorrow to decide 

the question of a further mobilisation of Communists, c) To 
adopt extra measures to speed up general mobilisation of Byelo- 
russians, d) To transfer the 6th Division of the 1st Mounted Army 
to the Wrangel front.... e) To send 55 per cent of the mobilised 
Communists to the Wrangel front, and the remainder to the West- 
ern Front." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 446.) p. 418 

436 The summer of 1920 saw the beginning of the liberation of the 
Western Ukraine by the Red Army. The rule of the bourgeoisie 
and landowners was abolished in 16 uyezds of Eastern Galicia 
and Soviet power was established there. A provisional regional 
Soviet authority in Eastern Galicia — the Galician Revolution- 
ary Committee headed by V. P. Zatonsky — was set up in Ter- 
nopol. In the uyezds, local revolutionary committees were 
formed, which strove to enforce the decrees of the people's govern- 
ment. Lenin warmly welcomed the establishment of Soviet power 



NOTES 



551 



in Eastern Galicia and helped the Galician Communists in their 
Party and Soviet activities. p. 419 

437 Proletcult — a cultural and educational organisation which arose 
in September 1917 as an independent workers' organisation. Its 
leadership was in the hands of A. A. Bogdanov and his support- 
ers. After the October Revolution, Proletcult continued to uphold 
its "independence", thus setting itself in opposition to the Soviet 
state. In consequence, Proletcult was infiltrated by bourgeois 
intellectuals who began to exert a decisive influence on it. Its 
members actually denied the importance of the cultural heritage, 
wanted to shut themselves off from the tasks of cultural and edu- 
cational work among the masses, and tried to create a special 
"proletarian culture" by "laboratory methods", in isolation from 
life. In a draft resolution "On Proletarian Culture" (see present 
edition, Vol. 31, pp. 316-17) and in a number of other works, 
Lenin trenchantly criticised the erroneous principles of Prolet- 
cult. In the early 1920s its organisations began to decline and in 
1932 it ceased to exist. p. 419 

438 This refers to the landing in the Kuban area in the middle of 
August 1920 of a whiteguard force, organised by Wrangel with 
the consent and support of the Entente. The aim of the raid was 
to cut off from the Soviet Republic one of the most fertile grain 
areas of the country. As a result of stubborn, fierce battles, the 
Red Army routed the whiteguard units and in the beginning of 
September the remnants of the landing force were thrown back 
into the Crimea. p. 420 

439 Written below the text of the copy of a telegram sent to Lenin 
from Vilno on August 19, 1920, by V. S. Mickiewicz-Kapsukas, 
a member of the Central Committee of the Lithuanian-Byelorussian 
Communist Party. He reported that revolutionary feeling in 
Lithuania was rising and "by the day of our departure from Vilno, 
it may end in a mass armed uprising against the Lithuanian white- 
guards", and asked: "Do you find it possible for us to prepare for 
a decisive battle?" 

On the same copy Lenin wrote to Trotsky: "Comrade Trotsky, 
if you agree, send it off or return it to me for coding. Lenin." 
On the document there is also a note by Lenin: "Stalin agrees", 
and Trotsky's mark indicating his agreement. p. 421 

440 In a telegram to People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs Chiche- 
rin on July 30, 1920, M. M. Litvinov, plenipotentiary abroad 
of the R.S.F.S.R. Council of People's Commissars, reported the 
arrival in Copenhagen of the American industrialist Vanderlip, 
who wanted to obtain a concession to exploit oil, coal, and the 
fisheries of Primorye Region and Kamchatka. 

In the Central Party Archives of the Institute of Marxism- 
Leninism of the C.C., C.P.S.U., there is a note written by 
Lenin on Chicherin's letter dated August 21, 1920, in which Le- 
nin agrees to Vanderlip visiting Moscow. 



552 



NOTES 



Vanderlip arrived in Moscow on September 17, 1920, to ne- 
gotiate an agreement for the concessions. On the same day Chi- 
cherin wrote to Lenin suggesting that negotiations with Vanderlip 
be started at once and setting out his views on the subject. Lenin 
wrote on this letter: "Comrade Chicherin, I am wholly in favour 
of negotiations. Hasten them. Think over what more should be 
done for directives to Krasnoshchokov." (Collected Works, Fifth 
Ed., Vol. 51, p. 448.) 

An inter-departmental commission of representatives of the 
Supreme Economic Council, the People's Commissariat for For- 
eign Affairs and the People's Commissariat for Foreign Trade, 
was set up to conduct the negotiations. In agreeing to offer a 
concession to Vanderlip's syndicate, the Soviet Government 
aimed not only at establishing mutually profitable co-operation 
with American business circles, but also at normalising relations 
between Soviet Russia and the U.S.A. In a letter to the Vander- 
lip syndicate on November 1, 1920, Chicherin pointed out: "In- 
dependently of the signing of a concession agreement, the Govern- 
ment of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic as- 
sumes that the agreement will come into force only on the resump- 
tion of normal de facto relations between the Government of 
Russia and the Government of the U.S.A., and on condition that 
such relations will be established before July 1, 1921." How- 
ever, this condition was not fulfilled, hence the concession agree- 
ment with Vanderlip was not finalised and did not come into 
effect. p. 423 

This refers to the circular letter of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) drafted 
by Y. A. Preobrazhensky on the basis of his report dealing with 
signs of demoralisation in the Party. Commenting on this draft, 
Krestinsky wrote: "I consider that the reservation contained at 
the end of point V, which speaks of eliminating inequality in 
living conditions, 'in so far as they are not due to the require- 
ments of the work', should be elaborated as a separate point or, 
perhaps, even as a separate section of the circular. 

"The point is that the living conditions of gubernia Party 
and Soviet officials are very hard, especially now that we are 
carrying out transfers on a mass scale and tearing most comrades 
away from the places where they had all kinds of family connec- 
tions and links with the countryside. 

"The comrades are suffering hunger, and since, in addition, 
they are overworked, they very soon become exhausted and put 
out of action for a long time or permanently. It is essential 
to get the mass of Party members to recognise the need of estab- 
lishing somewhat better, less famished conditions of life for the 
small number of active revolutionary cadres. 

"If the above idea is sufficiently emphasised and elaborated 
in the circular, the last two lines of the draft, which very cautious- 
ly and not very intelligibly condemn demagogy on the grounds 
of inequality, will become superfluous. 

"In the discussion in the commission, Comrade Preobrazhen- 



NOTES 



553 



sky did not deny the need to include in the circular the idea of 
a certain inevitable temporary inequality, but he somehow 
failed to make his point." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, 
p. 449.) 

The Orgbureau's text of the letter from the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), 
"To All Party Organisations, to All Party Members", signed by 
Krestinsky, was sent to Lenin for approval. On this letter 
Lenin wrote that he agreed with the text and proposed the in- 
sertion in the letter of "a quotation from the Party programme to 
the effect that for the present there cannot be equality". This 
refers to clause 8 of the economic section of the programme. See 
KPSS v rezolyutsiyakh i resheniyakh syezdov, conferentsii i 
plenumov TsK (C.P.S.U. in Resolutions and Decisions of 
Congresses, Conferences and Plenary Meetings of Its Central Com- 
mittee), Part I, 1954, p. 423. 

The circular letter of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) was published on 
September 4, 1920, in Izvestia of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) No. 21. 

p. 423 

On August 27, 1920, Orjonikidze received Lenin's letter, to which 
were appended extracts from a letter by A. S. Serafimovich, who 
in the summer of 1920 was in the Caucasus. Being misinformed 
about the political work of Party and administrative functionaries 
in the Caucasus, Serafimovich in his letter adduced a number of 
alleged facts casting a slur on the revolutionary activity of Orjo- 
nikidze, a member of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 
Caucasian Front. In returning these extracts to Lenin, Orjonikidze 
refuted all the accusations against him as being false and ground- 
less. 

On receiving this reply, Lenin wrote: "I think Sergo ( = Orjo- 
nikidze) is incapable of lying." (Collected Works, Fifth Ed., 
Vol. 51, p. 450.) p. 423 

Written in reply to a letter to Lenin dated August 27, 1920, from 
N. N. Krestinsky, Secretary of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), concerning 
an article by A. Kolegayev, "The Scalp Hunters", published 
in the newspaper Gudok No. 77. The author of the article 
attacked the Food Commissariat for requisitioning the grain 
brought to Moscow by one of the departments of the People's 
Commissariat for Railways. Krestinsky proposed that the author 
of the article and the editors of Gudok should be censured for 
such impermissible publications. On September 1, 1920, the Polit- 
bureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) reprimanded Kolegayev and the 
editors of Gudok and warned the editors "on no account to allow 
publication of articles of a departmental-polemical nature 
aimed against the Supreme Economic Council, the People's Com- 
missariat for Food or other Commissariats" (Collected Works, 
Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 450). p. 424 

A. G. Beloborodov, Deputy Chairman of the Council of the Caucas- 
ian Labour Army, reported in his telegram that the counter- 



554 



NOTES 



revolutionary whiteguard landing force in the Kuban area would 
be liquidated in the immediate future (see Note 438). p. 425 

445 Written on a copy of a telegram from V. M. Sverdlov, Deputy 
People's Commissar for Railways, sent on August 27, 1920, from 
Saratov, requesting that textiles, footwear and household arti- 
cles be issued for 345 families of railwaymen, who had been 
the victims of a fire. Owing to the absence of clothing, wrote 
Sverdlov, they could not go to work, and this threatened an inter- 
ruption in railway traffic. p. 425 

446 See Note 442. p. 426 

447 This refers to the publication by Goznak (the Administration 
of Factories for the Issue of Banknotes) of a pamphlet On the 
Construction of a Special State Paper Mill, Moscow, 1920. The 
pamphlet was printed on high-grade paper and its 36 pages had 
11 insets on art paper. p. 426 

448 According to the reminiscences of Lenin's chauffeur, S. K. Gil, 
the peasants handed their petition to Lenin on September 5, 1920, 
during a halt in the village of Bogdanovo when he was out hunt- 
ing. The peasants complained that the local village Soviet had 
requisitioned from the poor peasants all their grain and seed 
corn, grossly distorting the policy of the Party and the govern- 
ment. 

Lenin followed up this petition the very next day; an investi- 
gation was made and the guilty persons were severely punished. 

p. 427 

449 The note to Fotieva was written on a letter to Lenin from 
A. A. Dammi, a naval mechanical engineer, who reported a new 
method of gold extraction. p. 428 

450 This refers to a code message which Lenin received on September 
8, 1920, from S. I. Gusev, a member of the Revolutionary Mili- 
tary Council of the South-Western Front, reporting proposals by 
"pseudonym", a deserter, the former Lieutenant Yakovlev, who 
had made his way through the 13th Army to Headquarters of 
the South-Western Front. The gist of Yakovlev's proposals was 
this: "A secret organisation of officers has been formed in Wran- 
gel's army aimed at blowing up Wrangel from within and handing 
over his whole army to the Soviet government. In the organisation 
there are some thirty General Staff officers. The organisation intends 
to overthrow Wrangel and proclaim his army the Red Crimean 
Army under the command of Brusilov. The Russian Government 
is asked to give real guarantees of a full amnesty for the whole 
army without exception, and issue a corresponding proclamation 
by the Commander-in-Chief. As proof of the seriousness of the 
proposal, Yakovlev is prepared to give away the leaders of 
Wrangel's organisation operating in Soviet Russia with the aim... 
of preparing an armed uprising. Temporarily, until the arrival of 
Brusilov, the command of the Red Crimean Army will be en- 
trusted to General Staff officer Sokolovsky, leader of the conspi- 



NOTES 



555 



racy against Wrangel" {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, 
p. 452). p. 428 

451 M. V. Frunze was appointed commander of the forces of the South- 
ern Front by decision of a plenary meeting of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
held on September 20-21, 1920. p. 428 

452 Regarding Yakovlev's proposals, see Note 450. 

The "Appeal to Officers of the Army of Baron Wrangel" 
signed by Kalinin, Chairman of the All-Russia C.E.C., Lenin 
Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars; Trotsky, Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Military and Naval Affairs; S. S. Kamenev, 
Commander-in-Chief of all the Armed Forces of the Republic; 
and Brusilov, Chairman of the Special Council of the Commander- 
in-Chief, was published on September 12, 1920, in Pravda No. 202. 
The Appeal called on the officers of Wrangel's army to renounce 
the shameful role of serving the Polish landowners and French 
usurers, and to lay down their arms aimed against their own 
people. Those who sincerely and voluntarily came over to the 
side of Soviet power were guaranteed a full amnesty. p. 429 

453 On September 28, 1920, Lenin signed a decree of the Council of 
People's Commissars drawn up by Lezhava (People's Commissar 
for Foreign Trade) and D. I. Kursky (People's Commissar for 
Justice) on procurement of raw materials for export. p. 430 

454 The decision of the Council of Labour and Defence and the order 
of the Field Headquarters of the Republic instructed the Revolu- 
tionary Military Council of the Caucasian Front to mobilise ur- 
gently horses and carts in the Northern Caucasus and Kuban 
area for ensuring transport of coal to the loading points in the 
Donets Basin. p. 431 

455 The instruction to Avanesov was written in connection with a 
memo from Lyubovich on the need to make use of the wireless 
receivers lying at the factories of the "Radio" Section in Petro- 
grad. p. 432 

456 This note to Lezhava was written on a letter dated September 15, 
1920, from Y. M. Dvorkin, Deputy Extraordinary Plenipoten- 
tiary of the Far Eastern Republic, who informed Lenin of Italian 
and French offers to sell motor lorries and motorcars of various 
makes to a total value of about 105,000 dollars. p. 433 

457 Lenin's note to Chicherin was written on a report from Command- 
er-in-Chief S. S. Kamenev concerning the strategic importance 
of the new frontier between Soviet Russia and Poland, about which 
negotiations were then being conducted between representatives 
of the two countries at the peace conference in Riga. 

See also notes 421 and 433. p. 434 

458 Written on a memorandum from Chicherin, who gave factual data 
on the violation by editors of Petrograd newspapers of the regula- 



556 



NOTES 



tions with regard to the publication of materials about the inter- 
national situation and foreign policy. p. 435 

459 The reference is to the Thirteenth Congress of the Czechoslovak 
Social- Democratic Workers' Party, held in Prague from Septem- 
ber 25 to 28, 1920. The Congress was preceded by a struggle between 
the revolutionary wing in the party — the Marxist Left wing — 
and the Right-wing reformist leadership. The Congress was 
attended by 321 persons, all supporters of the Left wing. At that 
time the party had more than 4,800 functioning organisations 
and almost 500,000 members. The Left wing at the Congress took 
over the leadership of the party and formed an independent party 
entitled the Czechoslovak Social-Democratic Workers' Party 
(Left). It included most of the members of the former Social- 
Democratic Party. The Congress condemned the splitting policy 
of the Right wing, expressed agreement with the conditions for 
affiliation to the Communist International, and instructed the 
new Executive Committee to conduct negotiations for joining 
the Communist International. The reformist leaders took the 
course of splitting the party and in November 1920 held their 
own Congress. p. 435 

460 On September 17, 1920, Lenin had a talk with S. I. Poroskun, 
a member of the Moscow Bureau of the Siberian Revolutionary 
Committee, who had returned from Siberia, and made notes of 
the measures proposed by Poroskun for helping the Siberian peas- 
antry (see Lenin Miscellany XXXV, p. 151). The results of this 
conversation and the measures proposed by Poroskun are reflected 
in this letter of Lenin's to the Siberian Revolutionary Committee. 

p. 436 

461 The note to Krzhizhanovsky was written on p. 21 of the Bulletin 
of the State Commission for the Electrification of Russia, No. 5, 
1920. 

Krzhizhanovsky returned the Bulletin to Lenin the same day 
with a note that the last numbers of the Bulletin were to be is- 
sued in the very near future "in each of which a plan will be given 
for small-scale (immediate) and large-scale electrification of 
the main areas". Simultaneously with drawing up the electri- 
fication programme, work had also been started on its imple- 
mentation. In particular, Krzhizhanovsky reported that in the 
Central Industrial Region fairly good progress was being made 
in the repair and socialisation of power stations (especially near 
Moscow). It was necessary now, he wrote, "to link the operation 
of these stations with the electrification of local agriculture on 
a wide scale. In this regard, too, I can inform you of something 
of immediate practical interest". 

Markings by Lenin occur also on p. 45 of the Bulletin, where 
he side-lined, underscored and marked "N.B." the sentence "the 
consumption of fuel by the railways will be 2'/2-3 times as much 
with steam traction as it would be with electric traction". (Col- 
lected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 455.) p. 437 



NOTES 



557 



462 On October 1, 1920, the Council of Labour and Defence discussed 
Lenin's report concerning the supply of coal and food to factories 
of Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gubernia, belonging to the key group 
of textile enterprises, and decided: "a) to endorse the agreement 
of September 28 of this year between the Ivanovo-Voznesensk Gu- 
bernia Food Committee and the People's Commissariat for Food; 
b) to take note of the statement of the People's Commissariat for 
Food that 40 railway wagons of food have been sent from Nizhni- 
Novgorod" (Lenin Miscellany XXXV, p. 155). p. 438 

463 The Red Army withdrew from Pinsk on September 28, 1920. p. 439 

464 Written in reply to a note from Bukharin concerning V. I. Nev- 
sky's article "Dialectical Materialism and the Philosophy of 
Dead Reaction" (see present edition, Vol. 14, p. 21). In his note, 
Bukharin pointed out that whereas previously Bogdanov had re- 
cognised philosophy, he now abolished it and replaced it by "tek- 
tology" or "universally organised science" (as Bogdanov called 
his book published in 1913). "This formulation of the problem 
is on a different plane from that of empirio-monism," wrote Bu- 
kharin. "It can be disputed but it is necessary at least to under- 
stand it. Nevsky, however, does not have this minimum require- 
ment." p. 439 

465 On the document is written in an unknown handwriting: "Note: 
Comrade Sklyansky's information has not been found." p. 440 

466 This note was written on a copy of a telegram dated October 2, 
1920, from E. M. Sklyansky, Deputy Chairman of the Revolution- 
ary Military Council, and M. F. Vladimirsky, Deputy People's 
Commissar for Internal Affairs, sent to the Revolutionary Military 
Council of the Western Front in Minsk, stating that "Smolensk 
University can be occupied only after the premises offered by 
the Executive Committee have been utilised". 

On this subject see also the present volume, Document 741. p. 441 

467 Written by Lenin in connection with a report from the Terek Re- 
gional Food Committee forwarded to him by Bryukhanov, Deputy 
People's Commissar for Food. The report dealt with the difficult 
conditions of work in the region as a result of Wrangel's landing 
in the Kuban area, with the unsatisfactory progress of food pro- 
curements, and with the feeling among the population. p. 442 

468 Written in connection with Chicherin's letter to Lenin of Octo- 
ber 5, 1920, reporting Rykov's talks with W. B. Vanderlip concern- 
ing concessions in the Far East. Rykov was insisting on shorten- 
ing the term of the concessions and the right to buy them back 
before their expiry, but Vanderlip would not agree to this. 

See also Note 440. p. 442 

469 By a decision of the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) on Octo- 
ber 11, 1920, N. I. Bukharin was directed to speak at a meeting 



558 



NOTES 



of the Communist group at the First All-Russia Congress of Pro- 
letcult, which was held in Moscow from October 5 to 12, 1920. 
The document published here was Lenin's reply to a note from 
Bukharin, who announced his refusal to speak at the Congress 
on the grounds that disagreements between him and Lenin were 
possible on certain questions of proletarian culture, for example, 
on point 4 of Lenin's draft resolution "On Proletarian Culture" 
(see present edition, Vol. 31, pp. 316-17). The Communist group 
at the First Congress of Proletcult was proposed to adopt an organ- 
isational resolution subordinating the central and local Proletcult 
organisations to the People's Commissariat for Education. 
This resolution was drawn up on the lines of Lenin's express di- 
rectives and was unanimously adopted by the Proletcult Con- 
gress, p. 445 

In an article "On the Struggle Within the Italian Socialist Party", 
written on November 4, 1920, Lenin quotes from a speech by 
Treves at a congress of the Italian reformists, which opened on 
October 11, 1920, in Reggio Emilia (see present edition, Vol. 31, 



In an effort to pit Turkey against Soviet Russia and to wreck ne- 
gotiations for establishing friendly relations, the Entente leaders 
instigated Dashnak Armenia to attack Turkey. Dreaming of creat- 
ing a "Great Armenia" which would include almost half of Asia 
Minor, the Dashnak government began military operations against 
Turkey on September 24, 1920. In this war the Dashnak army 
suffered defeat after defeat, while the advancing Turkish troops 
laid waste to the land, chased out the civilian population and 
organised massacres of Armenians. The war brought Armenia 
to the brink of complete ruin and total extermination of the popu- 
lation. At the beginning of October 1920, the C.C., C.P.(B.) of 
Armenia issued a call to the workers and peasants to overthrow 
the hated Dashnak yoke and establish Soviet power. 

In connection with Orjonikidze's report of the probable res- 
ignation of the Dashnak government of Armenia and of the 
possibility of power passing to the Communists, Chicherin 
proposed: 1) to agree with the opinion of the C.C., C.P.(B.) of Ar- 
menia and the Caucasian Bureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) on the 
necessity of decisive action for establishing Soviet power in Arme- 
nia, 2) to afford Armenia political help in halting the further ad- 
vance of the Turks, and 3) to support the new, Soviet government. 

On October 14, 1920, the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) 
adopted Chicherin's proposals. 

Soviet power in Armenia was established on November 29, 
1920, as the result of an armed uprising of the working people. 
For Lenin's message of greetings to the Chairman of the Revolu- 
tionary Military Committee of Armenia, see present edition, Vol. 



pp. 382-83). 



p. 445 



31, p. 437. 



p. 446 



This note was written because D. Z. Manuilsky objected to a deci- 
sion of the Politbureau of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) that he be 



NOTES 



559 



sent to Italy. On October 14, 1920, the Politbureau reaffirmed its 
previous decision and pointed out to Manuilsky that it was due 
to his ill-health. p. 446 

473 Written on a report from Commander-in-Chief S. S. Kamenev 
to the Chairman of the Revolutionary Military Council of the 
Republic. He proposed that the armistice with Poland should 
be utilised for the speediest rout of Wrangel's whiteguard forces. 
At the end of point 2 of Kamenev's practical proposals — on 
using part of the forces and resources of the Western Front for 
military operations in the south of the country "without touching 
those of the South-Western Front" — Lenin made an insertion mark 

x x 
" Y " with a footnote: "Add Y until the armistice becomes an 
actual fact." 

Under Lenin's proposal for approving the report of the Com- 
mander-in-Chief is a note by Krestinsky: "Agreed. N. K." and 
the signatures of Stalin and Bukharin. p. 447 

474 Written by Lenin on the minutes of an inter-departmental con- 
ference held on October 14, 1920. This conference considered it 
necessary to transform the Supreme Economic Council into a 
People's Commissariat for Industry and to set up an extra-depart- 
mental body under the Council of Labour and Defence for 
co-ordinating economic plans for production, transport, supplies, 
fuel, foreign trade, labour and currency distribution. 

Enclosed with Lenin's note was the text of the decision of 
the Ninth Congress of the R.C.P.(B.) "On Organisational Links 
Between the Economic Commissariats". This decision states: "The 
Congress instructs the Central Committee in the immediate future 
to work out a system of organisational links between the Supreme 
Economic Council and other Commissariats (the People's Commis- 
sariats for Food, Railways, Agriculture) that are directly linked 
with the economy in their daily work, with the aim of ensuring 
complete unity in carrying out the economic plan endorsed by 
the Party Congress." On the document are the following notes 
and signatures of those members of the Central Committee who 
read Lenin's note: "Read. N. Krestinsky" , "Read and agree 
with Lenin. L. Serebryakov" , "Agree with Comrade Lenin's 
proposal. F. Dzerzhinsky" , "Read, agree with Vladimir Ilyich. 
A. Andreyev" . In the hand of the secretary is written: "Comrade 
Tomsky has read it. Has telephoned that he fully agrees with 
Comrade Lenin." {Collected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 459.) 

p. 448 

475 The note to Sklyansky was written on a telegram from A. G. Schlich- 
ter, Chairman of the Tambov Gubernia Executive Committee 
and Chairman of the Gubernia Military Council, who requested 
that reinforcements be sent to the units of the Red Army operat- 
ing against bandit groups in Tambov Gubernia. 

On October 19, Lenin wrote a note to V. S. Kornev, Commander 
of the Forces of Internal Security, on the need for the speediest 



560 



NOTES 



liquidation of the counter-revolutionary outbreak in Tambov 
Gubernia, and he asked to be informed what measures were being 
taken (see present volume, Document 727). On October 23 a report 
was received from Kornev on the measures taken to put down 
the revolt in Tambov Gubernia. p. 448 

This refers to the comments on a memorandum received by the 
Council of People's Commissars from V. D. Batyushkov, head of 
the State Agricultural Museum, member of the Council and 
Chairman of the Board of the All-Russia Chamber of Agriculture 
and G. Frolov, member of the Chamber, "On the Use of 
Mechanical Power (Tractors) in Performing Agricultural Work 
(Ploughing and Harvesting)". 

See also Lenin's additions to the draft decree on an integrated 
tractor service {Lenin Miscellany XXXV, p. 164). p. 450 

On October 26, 1920, the Council of People's Commissars dis- 
cussed a draft decision on the sale abroad of antiques and endorsed 
the following decision: "1) To direct the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Trade to arrange for the collection of antiques selected 
by the Petrograd Commission of Experts and to fix a bonus for 
their most rapid and profitable sale abroad. 2) The question of the 
quantity and standard of rations for the Commission of Experts 
to be referred to the Workers' Food Supply Commission for de- 
cision. If agreement with Comrade Lezhava is not reached, the 
matter to be submitted to the Council of People's Commissars. 
3) To instruct the People's Commissariat for Foreign Trade to 
examine urgently the question of setting up a similar commission 
in Moscow and, if this is found advisable, to organise it." (Col- 
lected Works, Fifth Ed., Vol. 51, p. 462.) 

The Commission of Experts recommended sending the well-known 
antique expert, M. M. Savostin, and the artist I. N. Rakitsky, a 
member of the Commission, to European markets for antiques — in 
Paris, London, Florence and Rome — for establishing connections 
with the leading antique dealers in the West, ascertaining 
precise prices of antiques, and arranging auctions. p. 452 

Lenin wrote this note to the Narrow Council of People's Commis- 
sars on a letter from Maxim Gorky. In view of the fact that the 
Petrograd Commune was proposing to requisition the products which 
had been supplied by permission of the People's Commissariat 
for Food to the Petrograd Commission for Improving Scientists' 
Living Conditions, Maxim Gorky, Chairman of the Commission, 
asked the Council of People's Commissars to pass a decision stat- 
ing: "Products supplied by gubernia food committees, with the 
permission of the People's Commissariat for Food, to the Petro- 
grad Commission for Improving Scientists' Living Conditions 
are not to be requisitioned by the Petrograd Commune nor to 
be counted by the latter as part of the ration quota endorsed 
by the Council of People's Commissars for Petrograd scientists." 

p. 453 



NOTES 



561 



479 Written on a letter from Gorky saying that the State Publishing 
House had ordered. 1) Two books from Remezov in Switzerland: 
Fabre, The Life of Insects, Klein, Wonders of the World. Twenty 
thousand copies of each. 2) Biographies of musicians and artists, 
and cut-out alphabets from Brodsky in Stockholm. Total value 
of the contract: 1,200 000 gold rubles. p. 453 

480 Written in connection with a secret agreement between the bour- 
geois Latvian Government and agents of Wrangel for a joint at- 
tack against Soviet Russia. On September 26, 1920, when Count 
von Palen, a well-known agent of Wrangel's, was crossing the 
German frontier, letters were taken from him addressed to Savin- 
kov, Wrangel's agent in Warsaw. These letters reported that a 
secret meeting had taken place in Riga between a representative 
of Savinkov and representatives of the Latvian Government and 
Supreme Command of the Latvian army, at which agreement was 
reached on joint action with Wrangel aimed at overthrowing the 
Soviet Government and re-establishing a single indivisible Rus- 
sia, in return for which Wrangel promised independence for Po- 
land and Latvia. The confiscated letters also reported that sol- 
diers for Wrangel's army were being recruited in Latvia, that a 
recruiting office receiving financial support from Savinkov was 
operating almost openly in Riga and transporting soldiers on 
Latvian steamships. p. 454 

481 The People's Commissariat for Foreign Trade replied to Lenin 
that on October 28 and 29 a meeting had been held at the Chief 
Gold Board with representatives of the Urals and Siberia, at which 
practical measures were discussed for developing the gold and 
platinum industry. p. 454 

482 On October 27, 1920, Lenin received a delegation from a Party 
Conference of Alexandrov Uyezd (Vladimir Gubernia), consist- 
ing of Comrades Ratnikov, Rybakov, Romanov and Glazunov, 
who informed him of abuses at the Troitsk Equipment Works 
and of the difficulty Party members had bringing the matter to 
the attention of the centre and obtaining its speedy investigation. 
The letter to the Vladimir Gubernia Party Committee was the 
result of Lenin's conversation with this delegation. p. 455 

483 On October 30, 1920, following a report by Lenin and Milyutin, 
the Council of People's Commissars adopted a decision "On the 
Hydraulic Method of Peat Extraction". Hydraulic peat work, 
wherever carried out, was acknowledged to be especially urgent 
and of extremely great state importance. The Board of the 
Supreme Economic Council was instructed to organise under the 
Chief Peat Committee a Department for Hydraulic Peat Extrac- 
tion (Gidrotorf), with R. E. Klasson as responsible director. Con- 
crete measures were endorsed for developing work on hydraulic 
peat extraction. p. 458 

484 The document is the reply to a telegram from Frunze sent to Lenin 
on October 26, 1920, from Apostolovo station, in which Frunze 
reported: "I have just given the final order for a general offensive. 



562 



NOTES 



The decisive days will be October 30 and 31 and November 1. I have 
no doubt about the rout of the enemy's main forces. They will 
not succeed in withdrawing beyond the isthmuses by the time 
we strike. I consider that the chance of an immediate capture of 
the isthmuses is not more than one in a hundred." (M. V. Frunze 
na frontakh grazhdanskoi voiny. Sbornik dokumentov, Moscow, 



This document was written in reply to the following inquiry from 
P. I. Popov, head of the Central Statistical Board: "The 1920 
data on Soviet office workers in Moscow could be processed in 
four weeks' time. Please let me know what questions you wish to 
obtain answers to." 

In the Central Party Archives of the Institute of Marxism- 
Leninism of the C.C., C.P.S.U. there is a note of Lenin's — an 
instruction to the secretary — reading: "Make a note of the content 
of this paper and the date (30/X), and give the original to Popov." 
On this note there is a remark by the secretary: "Simply make a 
copy. Give the copy to Lenin for the book." 

The note on the typewritten copy reads: "Original given to 



1941, p. 415.) 



p. 459 



Popov 30/X. 



p. 459 



563 



NAME INDEX 



A 

Abramovich, Alexander Yemelya- 
novich (b. 1888) — joined the 
Russian Social-Democratic La- 
bour Party (R.S.D.L.P.) in 
1908. After the October Revolu- 
tion worked in the Comin- 
tern.— 326 

Adoratsky, Vladimir Viktorovich 
(1878-1945)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. In 1918 
worked in the Commissariat 
for Education, afterwards in 
the University of Kazan. Au- 
thor of a number of works on 
Marxist theory of the state and 
law, philosophy and the history 
of Marxism. — 366 

Alexander II (Romanov) (1818- 
1881) — Russian tsar, reigned 
1855-81.— 390 

Alexeyev, Mikhail Vasilievich 
(1857-1918)— general in the 
tsarist army. During the Civil 
War commanded the white- 
guard Volunteer Army organ- 
ised in the Northern Caucasus. 
—65 

Alferov, Konstantin Alexeyevich 
(b. 1883)— road-building en- 
gineer, joined the Russian Com- 
munist Party (Bolsheviks) 
(R.C.P.(B.)) in 1918. From the 
autumn of 1918 held the post 
of Assistant Commissar of the 
Board of Highroads, subse- 
quently worked in the Chief 
Committee of Public Buildings 



and Works (1919-21)— 348, 383 
Alliluyeva, Nadezhda Sergeyevna 
(1901-1932)— joined the 
R.C.P.(B.) in 1918. From 1919 
worked in the Secretariat of 
the Council of People's Com- 
missars. During the Civil War 
she was at the Tsaritsyn Front. 
Afterwards worked on the staff 
of the magazine Revolutsia i 
Kultura.— 395 
Altfater, Vasily Mikhailovich 
(1883-1919)— rear-admiral. Af- 
ter the October Revolution sid- 
ed with the Soviets. During 
the Brest peace negotiations 
acted as naval expert to the 
Soviet delegation. In Febru- 
ary 1918 appointed Assistant 
Chief of Main Naval Headquar- 
ters; in April became a mem- 
ber of the Board of the People's 
Commissariat for Naval Af- 
fairs, in October a member of 
the Revolutionary Military Co- 
uncil and Commander of the 
Naval Forces of the Republic. 
—144 

Andreyeva, Maria Fyodorovna 
(1868-1953)— well-known Rus- 
sian actress, public figure, the 
wife of Maxim Gorky. Joined 
the R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. Took 
part in the revolution of 1905. 
After the October Revolution 
took an active part in the 
country's public life. — 69 

Andronnikov, V. N. (1885-1942) 
—joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 



564 



NAME INDEX 



1905. During the October Revo- 
lution Chairman of the Eka- 
terinburg District Soviet and 
committee member of the Urals 
Regional Soviet. At the be- 
ginning of 1918 he was Chair- 
man of the Urals Regional So- 
viet and the Council of Com- 
missars of the Urals. From 
March 1918 to February 1919 
Commissar of Production. Sub- 
sequently held Party, govern- 
ment and business posts. — 
83 

Antonov — see Antonov-Ovseyen- 
ko, V. A. 

Antonov-Ovseyenko, Vladimir Ale- 
xandrovich (1883-1938)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. At 
the Second All-Russia Con- 
gress of Soviets was elected 
to the Council of People's Com- 
missars in the capacity of 
member of the Committee for 
Military and Naval Affairs. 
From the end of 1917 to the 
beginning of 1918 commanded 
the Soviet troops fighting Ka- 
ledin and the Central Rada. 
From March to May 1918 com- 
manded the Soviet troops in 
the south of Russia. From 
January to June 1919 Com- 
mander of the Ukrainian Front. 
From 1922 to 1924 Chief of 
the Republic's Political De- 
partment. Subsequently held 
various administrative, milit- 
ary and diplomatic posts. — 
49, 52, 56, 57, 59, 62, 66, 70 
213, 215, 223 

Aralov, Semyon Ivanovich 
(b. 1880)— joined the R.C.P.(B.) 
in 1918. From 1918 to 1920 
Chief of the Operations De- 
partment, first of the Moscow 
Military District, then of the 
People's Commissariat for Mil- 
itary and Naval Affairs; a mem- 
ber of the Revolutionary Mili- 
tary Councils of the Republic, 



of the 12th and 14th armies and 
the South-Western Front.— 139 
215, 231 

Armand, Inessa Fyodorovna (1874- 
1920)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. Professional revolu- 
tionary, active participant in 
the international women's la- 
bour and communist move- 
ment. Carried on Party work in 
Moscow, Petersburg and 
abroad. After the October Revo- 
lution a member of the Moscow 
Gubernia Committee of the 
Party and the Moscow Guber- 
nia Executive Committee, and 
Chairman of the Moscow Gu- 
bernia Economic Council. In 
1918 became head of the Wo- 
men's Department of the C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.).— 417, 420 

Artyom (Sergeyev, Fyodor An- 
dreyevich) (1883-1921)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P. in 1901. In 
1911 emigrated to Australia. 
Took part in the Australian 
labour movement. After the 
February 1917 revolution re- 
turned to Russia. After the 
October Revolution Chairman 
of the Council of People's Com- 
missars of the Donets-Krivoi 
Rog Soviet Republic, member 
of the C.C., C.P.(B.) of the 
Ukraine. At the Seventh Con- 
gress of the R.C.P.(B.) was 
elected to the Central Commit- 
tee. In 1919 was a member of 
the Council of People's Com- 
missars of the Ukraine. From 
1920 to 1921 Secretary of the 
Moscow Committee of the 
R.C.P.(B.); from 1921 Chair- 
man of the C.C. of the All- 
Russia Union of Mining Work- 
ers.— 71, 226, 240, 333-34 

Arzhanov, Mikhail Mikhailovich 
(1873-1941)— railway engineer. 
From 1918 onwards held key 
posts in organisations under 
the People's Commissariat for 



NAME INDEX 



565 



Railways. An active partici- 
pant in the Civil War in the 
post of Chief of the Central 
Board of Military Communica- 
tions of the Revolutionary Mil- 
itary Council of the Republic. 
He was a member of the Su- 
preme Council for Transport 
(1921). —339 
Asarkh, I. Kh. (d. 1918)— officer 
in the tsarist army who sided 
with the Soviets after the Oc- 
tober Revolution. Commander 
of an infantry regiment of the 
Red Army, afterwards of a 
detached composite brigade. — 
117 

Avanesov, Varlaam Alexandrovich 
(1884-1930)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. From 1917 
to 1919 Secretary and member 
of the Presidium of the All- 
Russia Central Executive Com- 
mittee, subsequently member 
of the Board of the State Con- 
trol Commissariat.— 292, 432 

Avksentyevsky, Konstantin Ale- 
xeyevich (1890-1941)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. 
Took part in the October Rev- 
olution and the Civil War. 
In 1920 commanded the 6th 
Army of the Southern Front 
was Assistant Commander of 
the Southern Front, Deputy 
Commander of the troops of 
the Turkestan Front, and in 
1921 Deputy Commander of 
the armed forces of the Uk- 
raine. — 345 

Avrov, Dmitry Nikolayevich 
(1890-1922)— joined the 
R.C.P.(B.) in 1918; an active 
participant in the Civil War. 
In 1919 Commandant of the 
Petrograd Fortified Area, after- 
wards Chief of Petrograd's In- 
ternal defence. In 1920-21 com- 
manded the troops of the Pet- 
rograd Military District. Took 
part in the suppression of the 



anti-Soviet Kronstadt mutiny 
in 1921.— 305 

Axelrod, Lyubov Isaakovna (Or- 
thodox) (1868-1946)— philoso- 
pher and literary critic, partic- 
ipant in the Social-Democratic 
movement, a Menshevik. Re- 
tired from political activities 
in 1918 and engaged in teach- 
ing at the country's institu- 
tions of higher learning. — 436 

Axelrod, Tovy L. (1888-1938)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 
1917, formerly a member of 
the Bund. From October 1917 to 
July 1918 was in charge of the 
Press Bureau of the Council of 
People's Commissars, and from 
1920 to 1921 managed the 
Press Department of the Com- 
intern. In 1922 started work 
in the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Affairs. Subse- 
quently worked on editorial 
and publishers' staffs.— 81 

B 

Babkin, Ivan Petrovich (1885- 
1940)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1902. In 1917 helped to es- 
tablish Soviet rule on the Don, 
where he was a member of the 
Revolutionary Committee and 
of the Rostov-Nakhichevan So- 
viet. From 1920 onwards held 
administrative and business 
posts. — 357 

Bach.— 96 

Badayev, Alexei Yegorovich (1883- 
1951)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. Deputy to the Fourth 
Duma, member of the Bol- 
shevik parliamentary group. 
After the October Revolution 
Chairman of the Petrograd 
Food Board, Food Commissar 
of Petrograd and the Northern 
Region, and held other official 
posts. — 218, 223, 359, 375, 
392, 393 



566 



NAME INDEX 



Balabanova, Angelica (b. 1878) — 
Social-Democrat; after the Sec- 
ond Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. 
(1903) a Menshevik. Later took 
an active part in the Italian So- 
cialist Party; during the First 
World War was a member of 
the Zimmerwald Association. 
In 1917 joined the Bolshevik 
Party. Attended the First Con- 
gress of the Comintern as a 
non-voting delegate. In 1924 
Balabanova was expelled from 
the Party for adopting a Men- 
shevik position. — 155 

Bank (Libavsky), Solomon Aro- 
novich (1894-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. In 
1918 Secretary and member of 
the Presidium of the Vyshny 
Volochok Uyezd Executive 
Committee; from June to De- 
cember 1918 Chairman of the 
Uyezd Economic Council. — 175 

Basin.— 374 

Belenky, A. Y. (1883-1941)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1902. 
Emigrated to France in 1904. 
After the October Revolution 
worked in the Vecheka and 
O.G.P.U.; from 1919 to 1924 
Chief of Lenin's bodyguard. — 
380, 384 

Beloborodov, Alexander Georgie- 
vich (1891-1938)— joined the 
Bolshevik Party in 1907. After 
the February 1917 revolution 
a member of the Urals Region- 
al Committee of the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.). In 1919 author- 
ised agent of the Council of 
Labour and Defence at the 
Southern Front, member of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the 9th Army. In 1920 
Deputy Chairman of the Re- 
volutionary Council of the 
Caucasian Labour Army. At 
the Eighth Congress of the 
Party was elected to the Central 



Committee.— 216, 228, 250 
411, 425 

Benes, Frantisek (b. 1882) — com- 
positor by trade. Came to Rus- 
sia in August 1916. In May 
1917 joined the R.S.D.L.P.(B.), 
later a member of the Czecho- 
slovak Section of the C.C., 
R.C.P.(B.) and the Section's 
C.C. In 1918 a member of the 
staff of the Czechoslovak De- 
partment of the People's Com- 
missariat for Nationalities. In 
February 1920 he returned to 
Czechoslovakia, where he joined 
the Right wing of the So- 
cial-Democratic Party; worked 
on the newspaper Duch Casu, 
which was published in Mo- 
ravska Ostrava and expressed 
the views of the Right Social- 
Democrats. — 435 

Berkalov, Yevgeny Alexandrovich 
(1878-1952)— professor, Doctor 
of Technical Sciences, Member 
of the Academy of Artillery 
Sciences, Lieutenant-General of 
the Engineering Service. Joined 
the Soviet armed forces at 
the beginning of the Red Ar- 
my's organisation. — 260 

Berzin (Berzin-Ziemelis), Jan 
Antonovich (1881-1938)— vete- 
ran of the revolutionary move- 
ment in Latvia; joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1902. In 1918 
headed the Soviet Mission in 
Switzerland. In 1919 People's 
Commissar for Education in 
Soviet Latvia. Later held dip- 
lomatic and government 
posts.— 106, 123, 151, 153, 158, 
160, 196 

Berzin, Reingold Iosifovich (1888- 
1939)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1905. In November 1917 
commanded the troops of the 
Northern Group for the sup- 
pression of the counter-revo- 
lutionary conspiracy at Army 
Headquarters in Mogilev. In 



NAME INDEX 



567 



June 1918 Commander of the 
Northern-Urals-Siberian Front, 
and later of the 3rd and 9th 
armies of the Southern Front. 
From 1919 to 1920 a member 
of the Revolutionary Military 
Councils of the Western, South- 
ern and South-Western fronts. 
In later years held military 
and business posts. — 161 

Blagonravov , Georgi Ivanovich 
(1895-1937)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. After 
the October Revolution Com- 
missar of the Peter and Paul 
Fortress. In 1918 a member 
of the Revolutionary Military 
Council of the Eastern Front. 
From October 1918 to 1931 
worked in the Vecheka and 
O.G.P.U.; afterwards Deputy 
People's Commissar for Rail- 
ways and held other posts.— 49 

Blakitny (Yellansky), Vasily 
Mikhailovich (1894-1925)— 
Ukrainian Soviet writer and 
statesman. Formerly a leader of 
the Ukrainian Party of Left 
Socialist-Revolutionaries (Bo- 
rotbists) and editor of its cen- 
tral organ Borotba. Joined the 
Communist Party of the 
Ukraine early in 1920. A mem- 
ber of the Revolutionary Mili- 
tary Council of the 12th Army, 
member of the C.C., C.P.(B.) 
of the Ukraine, the All-Russia 
Central Executive Committee 
and the Central Executive Com- 
mittee of the U.S.S.R.— 357 

Blokhin, K. N. — Commander of 
the 2nd Army of the Eastern 
Front from June 18 to July 3, 
1918.— 122 

Bogdanov, A. (Malinovsky, Ale- 
xander Alexandrovich) (1883- 
1928)— Social-Democrat, philo- 
sopher, sociologist and econo- 
mist, a doctor by profession. 
After the Second Congress of 
the R.S.D.L.P. (1903) joined the 



Bolsheviks. Afterwards leader 
of the anti-Party Vperyod group. 
In June 1909 was expelled 
from the Bolshevik Party. After 
the October Revolution one of 
the organisers and leaders of 
Proletcult. In 1926 founded the 
Blood Transfusion Institute, 
of which he became Director. 
—439 

Bogdanov, V. I. (b. 1902)— mem- 
ber of the staff of the Commis- 
sariat for Agriculture in Bo- 
risoglebsk. — 169 

Bogolepov , Dmitry Petrovich 
(1885-1941)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1907. During 
1914-15 worked in the Social- 
Democratic parliamentary 
group in the Fourth Duma. 
After the October Revolution a 
member of the Board of the 
People's Commissariat for Fi- 
nance, Deputy People's Com- 
missar for Finance (1918). Sub- 
sequently held various finan- 
cial posts and worked as a 
teacher.— 76, 78 

Bogoyavlensky , L. N. — chemical 
engineer, Manager of the Ra- 
dioactive Metals Section of the 
Supreme Economic Council. In 
1918 Manager of the Berezniki 
Radium Plant.— 159 

Bonch-Bruyevich, Mikhail Dmit- 
rievich (1870-1956)— one of the 
first military specialists to side 
with the Soviets. He was Chief 
of Staff of the Supreme Com- 
mander-in-Chief, military lead- 
er of the Supreme Military 
Council, and Chief of Field 
Headquarters of the Revolu- 
tionary Military Council of the 
Republic— 128 

Bonch-Bruyevich, Vladimir Dmit- 
rievich (1873-1955) — profession- 
al revolutionary, joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1895. Particip- 
ant in the October uprising in 
Petrograd, Commandant of the 



568 



NAME INDEX 



Smolny-Tavrichesky District, 
Chairman of the Commission 
for Combating Riots, Bandit- 
ism and Counter-Revolution. 
During 1917-20 Business Man- 
ager of the Council of People's 
Commissars.— 49, 55, 61, 150, 
169, 301, 327, 337, 368, 443-44, 
446 

Bonch-Bruyevich, V. M. — see Ve- 
lichkina, V. M. 

Borchardt, Julian (1868-1932)— 
German Social-Democrat, econ- 
omist and publicist. — 107 

Bosh, Yevgenia Bogdanovna (1879- 
1925)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1901. After the February 
1917 revolution worked in Kiev 
as Chairman of the Party's 
Regional Committee; in Oc- 
tober 1917 a member of the 
Kiev Military Revolutionary 
Committee. After the October 
Revolution she was a member 
of the first Soviet Government 
of the Ukraine, afterwards held 
military, Party and adminis- 
trative posts. In 1923 iden- 
tified herself with the Trotskyite 
opposition.— 66, 138, 239 

Botin, Stepan Ivanovich — elec- 
trical engineer, worked on the 
problem of induced detonation 
by means of radio waves. His 
experiments were a failure. — 
384, 447, 460 

Brichkina, Sophia Borisovna 
(1883-1967)— from May 1919 
worked as Manager of the Gen- 
eral Office of the Council of 
People's Commissars, after- 
wards as secretary of the Coun- 
cil, minutes secretary of the 
C.C. Politbureau and C.C. plen- 
ary meetings and Deputy Bu- 
siness Manager of the Party's 
C.C— 324 

Brodsky — member of the staff of 
the Petrograd Branch of the 
Vsemirnaya Literatura Pub- 
lishers. In 1920 represented the 



State Publishers (Gosizdat) in 
Stockholm.— 453 

Broido, Grigory Isaakovich (1885- 
1956)— joined the R.C.P.(B.) 
in 1918, until then a Menshe- 
vik. In 1919 a member of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the 1st Army of the East- 
ern Front, afterwards head of 
the Foreign Relations Depart- 
ment of the Turkestan Commis- 
sion. In 1920 the Commission 
sent him to Khiva with emerg- 
ency powers. — 362 

Bronsky, M. G. (1882-1941)— 
joined the Social-Democratic 
Party of Poland and Lithuania 
in 1902, afterwards a member 
of the Bolshevik Party. After 
the October Revolution Dep- 
uty People's Commissar for 
Trade and Industry. In 1920 ap- 
pointed Envoy Plenipotenti- 
ary and Trade Representative 
in Austria. In 1924 a member 
of the Boards of the People's 
Commissariats for Finance and 
Foreign Trade, afterwards en- 
gaged in teaching and research. 
—86, 326 

Brunovsky . — 353 

Brusilov, Alexei Alexeyevich 
(1853-1926)— general in the tsa- 
rist army. In 1919 entered 
the service of the Red Army. 
In 1920 appointed Chairman 
of the Special Council under 
the Commander-in-Chief of the 
Republic's Armed Forces. Lat- 
er discharged the duties of 
Inspector of Cavalry. — 429 

Bryukhanov, Nikolai Pavlovich 
(1878-1942)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1902. After the 
February revolution (1917) 
a member of the Ufa Joint 
Committee of the R.S.D.L.P., 
Chairman of the Ufa Soviet. 
After the October Revolution 
a member of the Board of the 
People's Commissariat for 



NAME INDEX 



569 



Food, then Deputy People's 
Commissar, and in 1921 Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Food. — 76, 
109, 120, 125, 162, 309, 380, 
408, 438, 442, 452 

Bryusov, Valery Yakovlevich 
(1873-1924)— well-known Rus- 
sian poet. Joined the R.C.P.(B.) 
in 1919; head of the Library 
Section of the People's Com- 
missariat for Education. — 180 

Bubnov, Andrei Sergeyevich (1883- 
1940)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1903. After the February 
1917 revolution a member of 
the Moscow Regional Bureau 
of the R.S.D.L.P.(B.), of the 
Petersburg Committee and 
of the C.C. of the Party. Took 
an active part in the October 
Revolution as a member of the 
Petrograd Military Revolution- 
ary Committee and the Mili- 
tary Revolutionary Centre set 
up by the Party's C.C. for 
leadership of the armed upris- 
ing. In March 1918 became a 
member of the Ukrainian So- 
viet Government and of the 
C.C. of the C.P.(B.) of the 
Ukraine. In 1919 became a 
member of the Revolutionary 
Military Councils of the Ukrain- 
ian Front and of the 14th 
Army. In 1924 head of the 
Political Department of the 
Red Army and member of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the U.S.S.R. In 1925 Sec- 
retary of the C.C, R.C.P.(B.). 
From 1929 to 1937 People's 
Commissar for Education of the 
R.S.F.S.R.— 237, 247 

Budassi, Alexander Vladimirovich 
(d. 1941) — railway engineer. In 
January 1920 appointed Chief 
Engineer for the construction 
of the Alexandrov-Gai-Emba 
line and conversion of the 
Krasny Kut-Alexandrov-Gai 
line to a broad gauge. — 345-46 



Budyonny, Semyon Mikhailovich 
(1883-1973)— joined the 
R.C.P.(B.) in 1919. During 
1919-21 commanded a cavalry 
division, then a cavalry corps 
and the 1st Mounted Army, 
which played an important 
part in the defeat of Denikin, 
the White Poles and Wrangel. 
Subsequently occupied a num- 
ber of command posts in the 
Soviet Army.— 288, 341, 414, 
440 

Bukharin, Nikolai Ivanovich 
(1888-1938)— joined the Bol- 
shevik Party in 1906. After 
the October Revolution editor 
of Pravda, member of the 
Politbureau of the C.C, mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee 
of the Comintern. Repeatedly 
came out against the Party's 
Leninist policy: in 1918 headed 
the anti-Party group of "Left 
Communists"; during the trade 
union discussion within the 
Party (1920-21) he supported 
Trotsky's group; in 1928 head- 
ed the Right opposition within 
the C.P.S.U. In 1929 he was 
removed from the Politbureau 
of the C.C. In 1937 he was 
expelled from the Party for 
anti-Party activities. — 47, 98, 
99, 173, 283, 378, 439, 445 

Bukhartsev , Pyotr Vasilievich 
(b. 1886)— joined the R.C.P.(B.) 
in 1918. In April 1920 appoint- 
ed authorised agent of the 
People's Commissariat for For- 
eign Trade in the Northern 
Caucasus. — 389 

Bulatov, A. A. (b. 1877)— from 
March to November 1917 Com- 
missar of the bourgeois Pro- 
visional Government in Nov- 
gorod Gubernia. In 1919 Chair- 
man of the Artel Association 
in Novgorod.— 232 

Bulatov, Dmitry Alexandrovich 
(1889-1941)— during 1918-20 



570 



NAME INDEX 



Deputy Chairman of the Tver 
Gubernia Executive Commit- 
tee, Gubernia Food Commissar 
then Chairman of the Gubernia 
Executive Committee. From 
1920 engaged in Party work. — 
174 

Bullitt, William Christian 
(b. 1891) — American journalist 
and diplomat. In 1919 he was 
sent to Soviet Russia on a 
special mission by Wilson and 
Lloyd George.— 225, 386 

C 

Chicherin, Georgi Vasilievich 
(1872-1936)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1905. From 1918 
to 1930 People's Commissar for 
Foreign Affairs. Headed the 
Soviet delegations to the inter- 
national conferences in Genoa 
and Lausanne. A member of 
the All-Russia Central Exe- 
cutive Committee and the 
C.E.C. of the U.S.S.R.-63, 
68, 80, 88, 91, 98, 112, 136, 151, 
152, 165, 192, 224, 241, 244, 
247, 271, 272, 290, 300, 309, 
323, 325, 352, 365, 371, 373, 
378, 386, 391, 401, 412, 415, 
421, 423, 434, 435, 446, 454 

Chubar, Vlas Yakovlevich (1891- 
1941)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1907. From 1918 to 1923 
Chairman of the Board of the 
GOMZ group of engineering 
works, Chairman of the Chief 
Metal Committee of the Su- 
preme Economic Council, 
Chairman of the Economic 
Council of the Ukraine, Direc- 
tor of the Central Administra- 
tion of the Donbas Coal Mining 
Industry.— 431 

Churchill, Winston (1874-1965)— 
British statesman, Conserva- 
tive. During 1918-21, as War 
Minister, he was one of the 
leading spirits in organising 



armed intervention against So- 
viet Russia.— 421 
Chutskayev , Sergei Yegorovich 
(1876-1946)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. From 1918 
to 1921 a member of the Board 
of the People's Commissariat 
for Finance, then Deputy Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Finance. 
—352 

Clemenceau, Georges Benjamin 
(1841-1929)— French politician 
and statesman. From 1906 to 
1909 head of the French Govern- 
ment. In the interests of big 
capital pursued a policy of 
brutal repressions against the 
working class. After the victory 
of the October Revolution was 
one of the organisers and spon- 
sors of the blockade and armed 
intervention against Soviet 
Russia.— 224, 225 

Curzon, George Nathaniel (1859- 
1925)— British statesman and 
diplomat. During 1919-24 For- 
eign Secretary. One of the chief 
organisers of foreign military 
intervention against Soviet 
Russia. In July 1920, during 
the Polish-Soviet conflict, sent 
a Note to the Soviet Govern- 
ment demanding that the ad- 
vance of the Red Army be halt- 
ed at the line accepted by the 
Allied Supreme Council in De- 
cember 1919 as Poland's east- 
ern frontier, subsequently 
known as the "Curzon Line". — 
386, 403, 415 

D 

Dahl, Vladimir Ivanovich (1801- 
1872) — Russian dialectologist, 
ethnographer and writer. Au- 
thor of Dictionary of the Living 
Great-Russian Language. — 327 

Dan (Gurvich), Fyodor Ivanovich 
(1871-1947)— a leader of the 
Mensheviks, a doctor by profes- 



NAME INDEX 



571 



sion. After the February 1917 
revolution a member of the 
Executive Committee of the 
Petrograd Soviet and of the 
Presidium of the Central Exe- 
cutive Committee first convo- 
cation; supported the bour- 
geois Provisional Government. 
In 1920 deputy to the Moscow 
Soviet. Deported from the coun- 
try in the beginning of 1922 
as an enemy of the Soviet state. 
—350 

Danishevsky , Karl Khristiano- 
vich (1884-1941)— at the end of 
1906 elected to the C.C., 
R.S.D.L.P. on which he rep- 
resented the Social-Democrats 
of the Lettish region. After the 
October Revolution a member 
of the Revolutionary Military 
Council of the Republic and of 
the R.M.C. of the Eastern 
Front, Chairman of the Revolu- 
tionary Military Tribunal of 
the Republic. In 1920 Chair- 
man of the Soviet peace dele- 
gation to the conference in 
Minsk devoted to the question 
of ending the war and estab- 
lishing friendly relations be- 
tween the R.S.F.S.R., the 
Ukrainian S.S.R. and Poland. 
In 1921 Secretary of the 
Siberian Bureau of the C.C., 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.); subsequently 
held various business posts. — 
122, 412, 416, 417 

Daszynski, Ignazi (1866-1936) — 
Polish politician. From 1892 
to 1919 leader of the Galician 
Social-Democratic Party, then 
one of the leaders of the united 
Polish Socialist Party (Right- 
wing). From 1919 onwards 
thrice elected to the Polish 
Seim in which he was Chairman 
of the P.S.P. parliamentary 
group. In 1920 joined the Pol- 
ish Government of the bour- 
geoisie and landowners in the 



capacity of Deputy Prime Min- 
ister. Supported the fascist 
coup and the Pilsudski regime 
in Poland.— 415, 416 
Denikin, Anton Ivanovich (1872- 
1947) — general in the tsarist 
army. During the foreign mil- 
itary intervention and Civil 
War (1918-20) he was Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the white- 
guard armed forces in the south 
of Russia. After his defeat by 
the Soviet troops (March 1920) 
an emigre.— 204, 225, 259, 271, 
285, 289, 296, 299, 319, 342, 
343 

Dumas, Charles (b. 1883) — jour- 
nalist and publicist, member 
of the Socialist Party of France, 
member of parliament. — 51 

Dumenko, B. M. (1888-1920)— 
joined the R.C.P.(B.) in 1919. 
One of the organisers and com- 
manders of the Red Army 
during the Civil War.— 204 

Dybenko, Pavel Yefimovich (1889- 
1938)— after the February 1917 
revolution Chairman of the 
Central Executive Committee of 
the Baltic Fleet Soviets (Cen- 
trobalt). At the Second All- 
Russia Congress of Soviets 
elected to the Council of 
People's Commissars in the 
capacity of member of the 
Committee for Military and 
Naval Affairs. From October 
1918 until the end of the Civil 
War commanded units of the 
Red Army at the Ukrainian, 
Southern, Caucasian and other 
fronts.— 213, 219 

Dyrenkov , Nikolai Ivanovich — 
engineer; in March 1918 ap- 
pointed Business Manager of 
the Rybinsk Economic Coun- 
cil.— 7 

Dzerzhinsky, Felix Edmundovich 
(1877-1926)— one of the organ- 
isers of the Social-Democratic 
Party of Poland and Lithuania. 



572 



NAME INDEX 



Carried on Party work in Po- 
land and Russia. At the Fourth 
Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. 
(1906) was elected to the C.C. 
During the period of prepara- 
tions for and carrying out of the 
October Revolution he was a 
member of the Petrograd Mili- 
tary Revolutionary Committee 
and the Military Revolution- 
ary Centre for directing the 
uprising. After the victory of 
the Revolution he was Chair- 
man of the All-Russia Extra- 
ordinary Commission for Com- 
bating Counter-Revolution and 
Sabotage (the Vecheka). In 
1921 appointed People's Com- 
missar for Railways while re- 
taining his posts as Chairman 
of the Vecheka and People's 
Commissar for Internal Affairs. 
In 1924 Chairman of the Su- 
preme Economic Council. — 69, 
95, 173, 213, 245, 250, 282, 
283, 297, 338, 356, 368, 410, 
420, 425, 450, 451, 455 

E 

Eismont, Nikolai Boleslavovich 
(b. 1891)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. In 
1920 a member of the Board 
of the Supreme Economic Coun- 
cil, then Deputy Chairman 
of the S.E.C. of the R.S.F.S.R. 
—461 

Eliava, Shalva Zurabovich (1883- 
1937)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. In December 1917 
Chairman of the Presidium 
of the Vologda Soviet. In April 
1918 Deputy Chairman of the 
Vologda Gubernia Joint Exec- 
utive Committee, in November 

1918 a member of the Board 
of the People's Commissariat 
for Trade and Industry. In 

1919 a member of the Revolu- 
tionary Military Councils of the 



Eastern and Turkestan fronts 
Chairman of the Special Com- 
mission for Turkestan Affairs. 
Subsequently P.C. for Military 
and Naval Affairs of Georgia 
and of Transcaucasia, Chair- 
man of the Council of People's 
Commissars of the Transcauca- 
sian S.F.S.R.— 126, 315, 318, 
362, 376 
Eltsin, Boris Mikhailovich 
(b. 1875)— during 1919-20 
Chairman of the Ufa Gubernia 
Revolutionary Committee. — 
333 

F 

Fedoseyev, Mikhail Mitrofano- 
vich — owner of a printing-press 
in the town of Yelatma, Tam- 
bov Gubernia.— 195 

Fineberg, Joseph (1886-1957)— 
one of the founders of the Com- 
munist Party of Great Britain. 
In 1918 he came to Soviet 
Russia, carried on propaganda 
work among the intervention- 
ist troops and among the pris- 
oners of war. Took part in 
convening the First Congress of 
the Communist International 
and in the work of the Con- 
gress. Worked in the Comin- 
tern up to 1935.— 371 

Fotieva, Lydia Alexandrovna 
(b. 1881)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. In 1918 became secre- 
tary of the Council of People's 
Commissars and the Council 
of Labour and Defence, simul- 
taneously Lenin's private sec- 
retary.— 73, 151, 200, 201, 202, 
305, 359, 376, 377, 379, 394, 
400, 415, 428, 431 

Frankfurt, Sergei Mironovich 
(b. 1888;— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. After the October Rev- 
olution worked in the Commis- 
sion for the Implementation 
of the Brest Treaty, then Dep- 



NAME INDEX 



573 



uty Chairman of the Board of 
the Chief Coal Committee of 
the Supreme Economic Council 
(1919), member of the Siberian 
Bureau of the S.E.C. (1920). 
From 1921 to 1925 worked in 
the People's Commissariat for 
Foreign Affairs. — 454 

Frumkin, Moisei Ilyich (1878- 
1939)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1898. After the October Rev- 
olution a member of the Board 
of the Food Commissariat, Dep- 
uty People's Commissar for 
Food (up to March 1922). In 
1920 Deputy Chairman of the 
Siberian Revolutionary Com- 
mittee, then authorised agent 
of the Food Commissariat. 
Later Deputy People's Com- 
missar for Foreign Trade, Dep- 
uty People's Commissar for 
Finance, and held other posts. 
—298, 342, 442 

Frunze, Mikhail Vasilievich (1885- 
1925)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. During the Civil War 
Army Commander, Command- 
er of the Southern Group of 
the Eastern Front, Commander 
of the Eastern, Turkestan and 
Southern fronts. After the Civil 
War Commander of the troops 
in the Ukraine and the Crimea. 
In 1925 Chairman of the Rev- 
olutionary Military Council of 
the Republic and People's 
Commissar for Military and 
Naval Affairs.— 227, 259, 268, 
286, 291, 295, 308, 314, 332, 
376, 428, 459 

G 

Galaktionov , Alexei Petrovich 
(1888-1922)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1906. After the 
February 1917 revolution a 
member of the Samara Soviet. 
After the liberation of Samara 
from the White Czech troops 



(October 1918), Chairman of 
the Samara Gubernia Executive 
Committee. In 1919 special 
agent of the All-Russia Central 
Executive Committee for real- 
isation of the harvest in Sa- 
mara Gubernia. — 196-97 

Gerd, Alexander Yakovlevich 
(1841-1888)— Russian progres- 
sive educationist, author of a 
number of textbooks on natur- 
al science; from 1880 engaged 
in organising town schools in 
St. Petersburg.— 188 

Gil, Stepan Kazimirovich (1888- 
1966)— from 1917 to 1924 
Lenin's chauffeur. — 368 

Gillerson, Solomon Isidorovich 
(b. 1869)— during 1920-21 head 
of the Soviet Red Cross Mis- 
sion in Prague engaged in 
the repatriation of Russian 
prisoners of war from Czecho- 
slovakia.— 435 

Gittis, Vladimir Mikhailovich 
(1881-1938)— colonel in the 
tsarist army. From 1918 served 
in the Red Army. Commanded 
the 6th Army of the Northern 
Front, then the 8th Army and 
the armies of the Southern 
Front. From July 1919 to 
April 1920 Commander of the 
Western Front, then of the 
Caucasian Front.— 165, 240, 
264, 298 

Glazunov , Nikolai Yakovlevich 
(b. 1882)— during 1919-20 Com- 
missar at Strunino station, 
Northern Railway. — 455 

Glebov (Avilov, Nikolai Pavlo- 
vich) (1887-1942)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. After the 
October Revolution People's 
Commissar for Posts and Tele- 
graphs. In May 1918 Commis- 
sar of the Black Sea Fleet; 
subsequently member of the 
Presidium and Secretary of the 
All-Russia Central Council of 
Trade Unions, People's Com- 



574 



NAME INDEX 



missar for Labour of the 
Ukraine. —270 

Glyasser, Maria Ignatievna (1890- 
1951)— from 1918 to 1924 
worked in the Secretariat of the 
Council of People's Commis- 
sars.— 376, 458 

Goikhbarg, Alexander Grigorievich 
(1883-1962)— held key posi- 
tions in the People's Commis- 
sariat for Justice. Prosecutor 
at the trial of the Kolchak 
ministers in Omsk. From 1921 
to 1923 Chairman of the Nar- 
row Council of People's Com- 
missars. — 386 

Goldberg, Boris Isayevich (1884- 
1946)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1902. From 1919 to 1921 
Commander of the Reserve 
Army of the Republic and 
the Volga Military District; 
afterwards Deputy Chairman of 
the Chief Committee of Public 
Buildings and Works under 
the Supreme Economic Coun- 
cil, Assistant Chief of the Re- 
public's Air Force Board and 
held other posts.— 296, 308, 
359-60 

Goltsman, A. Z, (1894-1933)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 
1917. From 1917 to 1920 a 
member of the C.C. of the 
Metalworkers' Union. From 
1920 to 1921 member of the 
Presidium of the All-Russia 
Central Council of Trade Uni- 
ons.— 461 

Golub, Alexander Naumovich 
(b. 1885)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1905. After the 
October Revolution worked in 
the People's Commissariat for 
Labour and the People's Com- 
missariat for Foreign Affairs. 
In 1919 a member of the Ex- 
traordinary Commission sent 
to Khiva to conduct peace ne- 
gotiations; a member of the 
Board of the Commissariat for 



Foreign Affairs of the Turke- 
stan Republic. — 362 
Gomberg.— 81 

Gopner, David Yulievich (1884- 
1925) — during the October days 
took an active part in estab- 
lishing Soviet power in Ekate- 
rinoslav. From 1920 occupied 
key posts in Soviet Central 
Asia.— 362 

Gorbunov , Nikolai Petrovich 
(1892-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. After 
the October Revolution sec- 
retary of the Council of People's 
Commissars. In August 1918 
appointed Manager of the Sci- 
ence and Technology Depart- 
ment of the Supreme Economic 
Council of the R.S.F.S.R. Dur- 
ing 1919-20 a member of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cils of the 13th and 14th armies; 
subsequently Business Manager 
of the R.S.F.S.R. Council of 
People's Commissars. — 57, 68, 
72, 106, 108, 136, 156, 159, 

Gorky, Maxim (Peshkov, Alexei 
Maximovich) (1868-1936) — 
Russian author, the father of 
Soviet literature.— 211, 260, 
283-85, 286, 359, 370, 452 

Gorter, Herman (1864-1927)— 
Dutch Social-Democrat, pub- 
licist. During 1918-21 a 
member of the Dutch Commun- 
ist Party; took part in the 
work of the Comintern. — 155 

Graber, Ernest-Paul (b. 1875)— 
Swiss Social-Democrat. In 
1918 joined the Right wing of 
Swiss Social-Democracy. Dur- 
ing the First World War an 
internationalist, supporter of 
the Zimmerwald Left. In 1918-21 
a member of the Communist 
Party of Holland; took part in 
the work of the Comintern, 
adopted an Ultra-Left sectarian 
position. In 1921 he withdrew 



NAME INDEX 



575 



from the Party and subsequently 
retired from political activi- 
ty.— 153 

Graftio, Heinrich Osipovich 
(1869-1949)— Soviet power sci- 
entist, Academician, a pioneer 
of hydropower construction in 
Russia. From 1918 to 1920 
Assistant Chief Engineer, 
then Chief Engineer of the 
Volkhov hydropower project. 
Took part in the work of 
GOELRO (the State Commis- 
sion for the Electrification of 
Russia). Subsequently in charge 
of the construction of a num- 
ber of big hydropower sta- 
tions. — 415 

Grigoriev, N. A. (1878-1919)— 
officer in the tsarist army. In 
May 1919 raised a counter- 
revolutionary revolt in the 
rear of the Soviet military 
units in the south of the Uk- 
raine.— 229, 241 

Grimm, Robert (1881-1958)— a 
leader of the Swiss Social-Dem- 
ocratic Party. During 1909-18 
Editor-in-Chief of the news- 
paper Berner Tagwacht and 
Secretary of the party. From 
1911 a member of the Swiss 
parliament. Was one of the 
founders of the Vienna (II Y2) 
International. — 153 

Grinberg — 398 

Groman, Vladimir Gustavovich 
(b. 1874)— Social-Democrat, 
Menshevik. From the begin- 
ning of the February 1917 rev- 
olution was in charge of Pet- 
rograd's food supply. In 1918 
Chairman of the Northern Food 
Council. In 1919 special agent 
of the Council of Defence for 
the evacuation of Petrograd. 
In 1920 Chairman of the Com- 
mission for Studying the Losses 
to Russia's National Econ- 
omy Caused by the Imperialist 
and Civil Wars.— 305-06 



Cruzenberg (Borodin), Mikhail 
Markovich (1884-1951)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. From 
1907 to 1918 lived in America. 
From 1918 to 1922 worked 
in the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Affairs of the 
R.S.F.S.R. and in the Com- 
intern.— 399 

Guilbeaux, Henri (1885-1938)— 
French socialist, journalist. — 
153, 158 

Gukovsky, Isidor Emmanuilovich 
(1871-1921)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1898. After the 
October Revolution Deputy 
People's Commissar, then Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Finance. 
In 1919 member of the Board 
of the Commissariat for State 
Control. From 1920 onwards 
in the diplomatic service. — 
78, 81, 108, 110, 115-16 

Gusev, Sergei Ivanovich (Drab- 
kin, Y. D.) (1874-1933)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P. in 1896. 
After the October Revolution 
carried on political work in 
the Red Army. Member of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cils of the 5th and 2nd ar- 
mies, and of the Eastern, 
South-Eastern and Southern 
fronts.— 183, 194, 196, 217, 
243, 245, 249, 251, 254, 265, 
428 

H 

Haapalainen, Eero (1880-1938)— 
Finnish revolutionary, partic- 
ipant in the workers' revolu- 
tion in Finland in 1918; was 
People's Representative for In- 
ternal and Military Affairs in 
the Revolutionary Government 
of Finland and Commander-in- 
Chief of the Finnish Red 
Guard. After the defeat of the 
revolution resided in the 
U.S.S.R.-226 



576 



NAME INDEX 



Hanecki (Fiirstenberg), Jakob 
(1879-1937)— prominent leader 
of the Polish and Russian rev- 
olutionary movement, joined 
the Social-Democratic Party 
in 1896, member of the Chief 
Executive of the Social-Dem- 
ocratic Party of Poland and 
Lithuania. In 1917 a member 
of the C.C., R.S.D.L.P. Bu- 
reau Abroad. After the October 
Revolution a member of the 
Board of the People's Commis- 
sariat for Finance, Commissar 
and Manager of the People's 
Bank.— 46, 47, 99, 265 

Heller (Ciarini), A. M. (1891- 
1935) — born in Russia, emigrat- 
ed to Italy in 1916, where he 
took part in the socialist move- 
ment. Came to Soviet Russia 
in 1920, employed in Comin- 
tern work.— 362, 387, 445 

Henderson, Arthur (1863-1935)— 
a leader of the British Labour 
Party and trade union move- 
ment. In 1919 one of the 
sponsors of the Berne (Second) 
International.— 60, 421 

Herzog, Jakob (1892-1931)— Swiss 
Social-Democrat. On October 
1, 1918, expelled from the 
Swiss Social-Democratic Par- 
ty. Headed the Vorderung 
(Demand) group of a radical 
trend, which subsequently be- 
came known as the Old Com- 
munists group. Attended the 
Second Congress of the Com- 
intern. From 1921 onwards a 
member of the Communist Par- 
ty of Switzerland, formed as a 
result of the amalgamation of 
the Old Communists with the 
Left Social-Democrats. — 158 

Heywood, William (1869-1928)— a 
leader of the U .S. labour move- 
ment, one of the leaders of 
the Left wing of the Socialist 
Party. A founder and leader of 
the I.W.W. (Industrial Work- 



ers of the World). Shortly 
after the founding of the Com- 
munist Party of the U.S.A. 
he joined its ranks. Persecuted 
for his revolutionary activities, 
he left the United States. From 
1921 onwards he lived in the 
U.S.S.R .—44 
Hoglund, Carl Zeth Konstantin 
(1884-1956)— Swedish Social- 
Democrat, during 1917-24 a 
leader of the Swedish Commu- 
nist Party.— 326 



I 



Ilyin, Fyodor Nikolayevich (1876- 
1944)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1897. From 1907 to 1917 
a political emigrant abroad. 
After the October Revolution 
returned to Russia; worked 
in the Moscow Soviet, the Rev- 
olutionary Tribunal, the Su- 
preme Court, and the State 
Planning Commission of the 
R.S.F.S.R.— 432 

Ivanov, Andrei Vasilievich 
(1889-1927)— worker of the 
Putilov Works in Petrograd. 
In April 1918 elected Chair- 
man of the Works Com- 
mittee for Purchasing Food 
Products for the Workers.— 86 

Ivashchenko, D. Y. (1892-1947) 
—joined the R.C.P.(B.) in 1918. 
In 1918 Commissar of Orsha 
station. From 1920 onwards 
worked in the Cheka of Bye- 
lorussia, the frontier guards, 
the G.P.U. and the Commis- 
sariat for Internal Affairs. — 113 

Izmailov, Abdurakhman Yusupo- 
vich — during 1919-20 a member 
of the Bashkir Regional Com- 
mittee of the R.C.P.(B.), mem- 
ber of the Board of the Bashkir 
Cheka.— 334 



NAME INDEX 



577 



J 

Joffe, Adolph Abramovich (1883- 
1927)— joined the Social-Dem- 
ocratic movement at the end 
of the 1890s. During the Octo- 
ber days (1917) a member of 
the Petrograd Military Revo- 
lutionary Committee. In 1918 
a "Left Communist". During 
the Brest peace negotiations 
was a member of the Soviet 
delegation. From April to No- 
vember 1918 Soviet Ambassa- 
dor in Berlin; continued in the 
diplomatic service. — 68, 90, 91, 
98, 106, 111, 112, 123, 150, 
151, 153, 155, 156, 219, 237, 
434, 444 

Junius — see Luxemburg, Rosa. 

K 

Kaledin, Alexei Maximovich 
(1861-1918)— general in the 
tsarist army, a Don Cossack 
ataman. After the October Rev- 
olution a leader of the Cos- 
sack counter-revolution on the 
Don, helped to form the white- 
guard Volunteer Army, led the 
Cossack revolt. — 49, 53 

Kalinin, Mikhail Ivanovich 
(1875-1946)— worked in the 
first underground Marxist 
workers' circles and in the St. 
Petersburg League of Struggle 
for the Emancipation of the 
Working Class. Active partic- 
ipant in the first Russian rev- 
olution. At the Sixth (Prague) 
Conference in 1912 elected al- 
ternate member of the Central 
Committee, subsequently elect- 
ed to the Bureau of the C.C., 
R.S.D.L.P. in Russia. One of 
the organisers of the newspaper 
Pravda. During the February 
revolution (1917) a member of 
the Executive Commission of 
the Petersburg Committee. Af- 



ter the October Revolution the 
Mayor and then Commissar of 
the Municipal Services of Pet- 
rograd. From March 1919 on- 
wards Chairman of the All- 
Russia Central Executive Com- 
mittee. After the Eighth Con- 
gress of the R.C.P.(B.) (1919) 
C.C. member; from 1926 mem- 
ber of the C.C. Politbureau. — 
186, 212, 227-28, 234, 287, 346, 
429, 432 

Kalmykova, Alexandra Mikhai- 
lovna (1849-1926)— after the 
October Revolution worked in 
the Leningrad Department of 
Education and the Ushinsky 
Pedagogical Institute. — 368 

Kamenev (Rosenfeld), Lev Bori- 
sovich (1883-1936)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1901. Member 
of the editorial boards of the 
newspapers Proletary and Prav- 
da. At the Seventh (April) All- 
Russia Conference of the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) (1917) elected 
to the Central Committee. After 
the February 1917 revolution 
came out against the Party's 
line towards the socialist rev- 
olution. In October 1917 pub- 
lished in the semi-Menshevik 
newspaper Novaya Zhizn in his 
own name and in the name of 
Zinoviev a statement announc- 
ing their disagreement with 
the resolution of the C.C. con- 
cerning an armed uprising, thus 
divulging a secret decision of 
the Party and betraying the 
revolution. After the October 
Revolution he was Chairman 
of the Moscow Soviet, Deputy 
Chairman of the Council of 
People's Commissars and mem- 
ber of the C.C. Politbureau. 
Repeatedly came out against 
the Party's Leninist policy. 
At the Fifteenth Congress of 
the C.P.S.U. in 1927 was 
expelled from the Party as an 



578 



NAME INDEX 



active member of the Trotsky- 
ite opposition, and subsequently 
twice reinstated and re-expelled 
for anti-Party activities. — 57, 
149, 169, 196, 202, 219, 221, 
231, 245, 265, 273, 283, 293, 
333, 342, 350, 380, 401, 404-05, 
409, 415, 421, 423, 441 

Kamenev , Sergei Sergey evich 
(1881-1936)— colonel in the tsa- 
rist army; after the October 
Revolution sided with the So- 
viets. In September 1918 ap- 
pointed Commander of the 
Eastern Front. From July 1919 
to April 1924 Commander-in- 
Chief of the Republic's Armed 
Forces. During 1925-26 Chief 
of Staff, Chief Inspector of the 
Red Army, member of the Rev- 
olutionary Military Council 
of the U.S.S.R. From 1927 on- 
wards Deputy People's Com- 
missar for Military and Naval 
Affairs. —266, 270, 273, 281, 
286, 295, 300-01, 307, 342, 379, 
383, 389, 408, 409, 412, 416, 
421, 429, 434, 440, 447, 461 

Kaminsky, Grigory Naumovich 
(1895-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1913. In 
1917 authorised agent of the 
Moscow Regional Bureau of 
the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in Tula. 
After the October Revolution 
Chairman of the Tula Guber- 
nia Committee of the Party and 
the Gubernia Executive Com- 
mittee. Member of the Revo- 
lutionary Military Council of 
the 2nd Army. In 1920 Sec- 
retary of the C.C. of the Com- 
munist Party of Azerbaijan, 
Chairman of the Baku Soviet. 
From 1922 onwards occupied 
Party, trade union and admin- 
istrative posts.— 204, 240, 293 

Kamo — see Ter-Petrosyan, S. A. 

Karakhan, Lev Mikhailovich 
(1889-1937)— joined the revo- 
lutionary movement in 1904. 



Became a member of the Bol- 
shevik Party in 1917. Secretary 
and member of the Soviet de- 
legation at the Brest-Litovsk 
peace negotiations. From 1918 
onwards a member of the Board 
of the People's Commissariat 
for Foreign Affairs and Deputy 
People's Commissar. — 53, 68, 
152-53, 293, 356, 365, 391 
Karelin, Vladimir Alexandrovich 
(1891-1938)— one of the or- 
ganisers of the Left Socialist- 
Revolutionary Party and mem- 
ber of its C.C. In December 

1917 a member of the Council 
of People's Commissars in the 
capacity of People's Commissar 
for State Properties. In March 

1918 resigned from the Council 
following the signing of the 
Brest Peace Treaty. Was one 
of the leaders of the Left S.R. 
revolt in July 1918. After its 
suppression he emigrated. — 83, 
84 

Kartashov, A. V. (b. 1875)— in 
1917 Senior Procurator of the 
Synod, Minister of Creeds. La- 
ter a member of the white- 
guard government of Yude- 
nich.— 70 

Kautsky, Karl (1854-1938)— a 
leader of the German Social- 
Democratic Party and the Sec- 
ond International, first a 
Marxist, later an ideologist of 
Centrism (Kautskianism). Edi- 
tor of Die Neue Zeit, theoreti- 
cal journal of the German 
Social-Democrats.— 151, 153, 
155, 160, 290 

Kayurov, V. N. (1876-1936)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1900. 
In the summer of 1918 headed 
a food detachment in Kazan 
Gubernia; afterwards worked 
in the Political Department 
of the 5th Army of the Eastern 
Front. From 1921 onwards held 
business posts. — 203 



NAME INDEX 



579 



Kedrov, Mikhail Sergeyevich 
(1878-1941)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1901. After the 
October Revolution member of 
the Board of the People's 
Commissariat for Military Af- 
fairs, Military Commissar for 
army demobilisation. In May 
1918 he was sent to the north 
to organise the defence of the 
region. In March 1919 member 
of the Board of the Vecheka. 
From 1924 onwards worked 
in the Supreme Economic 
Council, the Commissariat for 
Health, the Supreme Court of 
the U.S.S.R. and the State 
Planning Commission of the 
R.S.F.S.R.— 129 

Keeley, Royal (b. 1875)— Amer- 
ican mechanical engineer. Came 
to Soviet Russia in September 
1919. After survey of factories 
in Moscow Gubernia and a 
study of general conditions of 
life in the R.S.F.S.R. he pre- 
sented to Lenin a report of 
his impressions and ideas for 
rehabilitating the ruined in- 
dustry. Worked in the Su- 
preme Economic Council as 
organising engineer. — 310, 312 

Kerensky, Alexander Fyodorovich 
(b. 1881)— Socialist-Revolution- 
ary. After the February 1917 
revolution Minister for Justice, 
Minister for the Army and 
Navy, and subsequently Prime 
Minister of the bourgeois 
Provisional Government and 
Supreme Commander-in-Chief. 
After the October Revolution 
fought against the Soviet gov- 
ernment, and in 1918 fled 
the country. — 168 

Keynes, John Maynard (1883- 
1946) — British bourgeois econ- 
omist. — 405 

Kharlamov, S. D. (b. 1881)— 
officer in the tsarist army; af- 
ter the October Revolution 



served in the Red Army. In 
1919 commanded the 16th Ar- 
my of the Western Front and 
the Southern Shock Group, and 
was Chief of Staff of the 
South-Western Front.— 297 

Kharlov, Vasily Nikolayevich 
(b. 1887)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. From 
1917 to 1918 a member of 
the Ostrovsky Uyezd Soviet, 
Pskov Gubernia; was Chair- 
man of the Pskov Gubernia 
Zemstvo Committee. During 
1918-20 a member of the Board 
of the People's Commissariat 
for Agriculture. In 1918 au- 
thorised agent of the Council of 
People's Commissars for re- 
alisation of the harvest in Sa- 
ratov Gubernia.— 75, 137, 145 

Khinchuk, L. M. (1868-1944)— 
during 1917-20 a member of 
the Board of the Moscow Work- 
ers' Co-operative Society.— 
168 

Khodorovsky, I. I. (1885-1940)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. 
During 1919-20 Chairman of 
the Kazan, then Tula Guber- 
nia Executive Committees, Sec- 
retary of the Siberian Bureau 
of the Central Committee, 
R.C.P.(B.)— 366 

Khryashchova, A. I. (1868-1934) 
— statistician. During 1918-26 
Manager of the Agricultural 
Census Department of the Cen- 
tral Statistical Board.— 201 

Kilbom, Karl (b. 1885)— Swed- 
ish Social-Democrat, jour- 
nalist. A member of the Swed- 
ish Communist Party, which 
he joined in 1917 and which 
he represented on the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Comin- 
tern.— 326 

Kirov (Kostrikov), Sergei Miro- 
novich (1886-1934)— joined tbe 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. In 1917 
leader of the Bolsheviks in 



580 



NAME INDEX 



Vladikavkaz, organiser of the 
struggle for a socialist revo- 
lution in the Northern Cauca- 
sus. As a delegate to the Sec- 
ond All-Russia Congress of 
Soviets he took part in the 
fighting during the October 
Revolution in Petrograd. In 
1919 Chairman of the Provi- 
sional Military Revolutionary 
Committee of the Astrakhan 
region. At the head of the 
11th Army helped to bring 
about the defeat of Denikin. 
In 1931 he became Secretary 
of the C.C., C.P.(B.) of Azer- 
baijan; in 1921 alternate mem- 
ber of the C.C., R.C.P.(B.), 
and in 1923 member of the 
C.C. In 1926 Secretary of the 
Leningrad Gubernia Committee 
of the Party and of the North- 
Western Bureau of the C.C, 
Ail-Union Communist Party 
(Bolsheviks). Was alternate 
member, then member of the 
C.C. Politbureau, member of 
the Central Executive Com- 
mittee of the U.S.S.R. In 1934 
Secretary of the C.C, of the 
Communist Party.— 347, 357 

Kiselyov , Alexei Semyonovich 
(1879-1938)— joined ' the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1898. In 1918 
elected Chairman of the Central 
Committee of Textile Industry, 
then member of the Board 
of the Supreme Economic Coun- 
cil. In 1919 Chairman of the 
Committee of the Council of 
Labour and Defence set up to 
inspect the Food Commissa- 
riat, and member of the Presi- 
dium of the Central Executive 
Committee. In 1920 Chairman 
of the Miners' Union, — 355 

Kizas, A. P. (1899-1959)— from 
November 1917 to August 1922 
worked in the Secretariat of 
the Council of People's Com- 
missars. — 376 



Klasson, Robert Eduardovich 
(1868-1926)— outstanding pow- 
er engineer. Took an active 
part in drafting the GOELRO 
(electrification) plan; was Di- 
rector of the 1st Moscow Elec- 
tric Station.— 456-58 

Klein, Hermann (1844-1914)— 
German astronomer, author of 
popular science books on as- 
tronomy. — 453 

Klinger, G. K. (b. 1876)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917, 
attended the First, Second and 
Third Congresses of the Com- 
munist International, in 1919 
Business Manager of the Com- 
intern. During 1920-24 worked 
in the People's Commissariat 
for Nationalities, afterwards 
Manager of the Department of 
Nationalities and Manager of 
the Secretariat of the Presidium 
of the All-Russia Central 
Executive Committee.— 326 

Kobetsky, Mikhail Veniamino- 
vich (1881-1937)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. During 
1920-21 Secretary of the Exe- 
cutive Committee of the Co- 
mintern. During 1921-23 De- 
partment Manager of the Com- 
intern Executive Committee; 
subsequently in the diploma- 
tic service. — 397 

Kobozev, Pyotr Alexeyevich 
(1878-1941)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1898. From No- 
vember 1917 to February 1918 
Commissar Extraordinary of 
the Orenburg-Turgai region, 
afterwards appointed Commis- 
sar Extraordinary in Central 
Asia; was Chairman of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the Eastern Front. 
In 1919 a member of the Tur- 
kestan Commission of the All- 
Russia CE.C and the Coun- 
cil of People's Commissars of 
the R.S.F.S.R. During 1919-20 



NAME INDEX 



581 



member of the Board of the 
People's Commissariat for 
Workers' and Peasants' Inspec- 
tion. During 1922-23 Chairman 
of the Council of Ministers of 
the Far Eastern Republic— 122 

Kokoshkin, Fyodor Fyodorovich 
(1871-1918)— a leader of the Ca- 
det Party. After the February 
1917 revolution a Minister in 
the bourgeois Provisional Gov- 
ernment. — 54 

Kolchak, Alexander Vasilievich 
(1873-1920)— admiral of the 
tsarist Navy. During 1918-19 
one of the chief leaders of the 
Russian counter-revolution. 
With the support of the impe- 
rialists of the U.S.A., Britain 
and France, proclaimed him- 
self Supreme Ruler of Russia 
and headed the military dicta- 
torship of the bourgeoisie and 
landowners in the Urals, Si- 
beria and the Far East. The 
advance of the Red Army and 
growth of the revolutionary 
partisan movement led to the 
downfall of the Kolchak regime. 
Kolchak himself was cap- 
tured and on February 7, 
1920, by a decision of the 
Irkutsk Revolutionary Commit- 
tee, he was executed. — 191, 
196, 225, 250, 259, 285, 319, 
382, 386 

Kolegayev , Andrei Lukich 
(1887-1937)— Left Socialist- 
Revolutionary. In December 
1917 a member of the Council 
of People's Commissars in the 
capacity of Commissar for Ag- 
riculture. In March 1918 re- 
signed from the Council fol- 
lowing the signing of the Brest 
Peace Treaty. After the sup- 
pression of the Left S. R. re- 
volt he broke with the S.R. 
Party and in November 1918 
joined the R.C.P.(B.). He was 
Chief of Supply of the South- 



ern Front and member of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the front. — 61, 114, 201 
Kolesov, Fyodor Ivanovich 
(1891-1940)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. Ac- 
tive participant in the October 
Revolution in Turkestan. From 
November 1917 to November 

1918 Chairman of the Council 
of People's Commissars of the 
Turkestan Republic. During 
1919-22 held political key posts 
in the Red Army. Afterwards 
occupied business posts. — 118, 
140 

Ron, Felix (1864-1941)— a vete- 
ran leader of the Polish revo- 
lutionary labour movement. 
After the February 1917 revo- 
lution he came to Russia and 
in 1918 joined the R.C.P.(B.). 
Engaged in Party work in the 
Ukraine and in Moseow. — 372 

Kopp, Viktor Leontievich 
(1880-1930)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917; from 

1919 to 1930 worked in the 
People's Commissariat for For- 
eign Affairs of the U.S. S.R. 
—326 

Kornev, Vasily Stepanovich 
(b. 1889)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. Dur- 
ing 1918-19 Chairman of the 
Ryazan Gubernia Executive 
Committee, then Deputy Peo- 
ple's Commissar for Internal 
Affairs in charge of the Forces 
of Internal Security, mem- 
ber of the Board of the Ve- 
cheka, Chief of the Militia of 
the R.S.F.S.R.— 450, 451 

Korolenko, Vladimir Galaktiono- 
vich (1853-1921)— Russian au- 
thor and publicist. — 284 

Kostelovskaya, Maria Mikhailov- 
na (1878-1964)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. After the 
February 1917 revolution Sec- 
retary of Moscow's Presnya 



582 



NAME INDEX 



District Committee of the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.). Active partici- 
pant in the October armed up- 
rising in Moscow. During the 
Civil War Chief of the Polit- 
ical Department of the 2nd 
Army of the Eastern Front. — 
199, 222 

Kostyaev , Fyodor Vasilievich 
(Jo. 1878)— officer in the tsar- 
ist army; sided with the So- 
viets after the October Revo- 
lution. In 1918 Chief of Staff 
of the Northern Front- after- 
wards Chief of Staff of the 
Revolutionary Military Coun- 
cil of the Republic. Later in- 
structor at the Military Acad- 
emy of the General Staff. — 
231 

Kovylkin, Stepan Terentievich 
(1887-1943)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1905. After the 
February 1917 revolution 
Chairman of the Factory Com- 
mittee of the Railway Work- 
shops in Saratov, then member 
of the Executive Committee of 
the Soviet. In 1919 started 
work on transport: a member 
of the Board of the Commissa- 
riat for Railways, Manager of 
the Transport Department of 
the Vecheka, Superintendent of 
the South-Eastern Railway, au- 
thorised agent for combating 
banditism on the railways and 
water transport and held other 
posts.— 339 

Kozhevnikov, Sergei Nikolayevich 
(1896-1938)— joined ' the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917; in 
1918 Commissar Extraordinary 
of the Donets Basin, after- 
wards held political key posts 
in the Red Army.— 62-63 

Kozmin, P. A. (1871-1936)— 
technologist, subsequently Doc- 
tor of Technical Sciences, 
professor. After the October 
Revolution member of the 



Board of the Food Commissa- 
riat and Commissar for the 
Supply of Agricultural Ma- 
chines to the Countryside, after- 
wards Deputy Chairman of the 
Special Defence Council. 
Helped in the drafting of the 
GOELRO (electrification) plan. 
—50 

Krasikov , Pyotr Ananievich 
(1870-1939)— joined the revo- 
lutionary movement in 1892; 
Social-Democrat, Bolshevik. 
After the October Revolution 
Chairman of the Commission 
of Inquiry for Combating Coun- 
ter-Revolution, then member 
of the Board of the U.S.S.R. 
People's Commissariat for Jus- 
tice, simultaneously in charge 
of the Commissariat's Depart- 
ment which handled the draft- 
ing and enforcement of de- 
crees and measures aimed at 
the disestablishment of the 
Church.— 351 

Krasin, Leonid Borisovich 
(1870-1926)— joined the Social- 
Democratic movement in the 
1890s. After the Second Con- 
gress of the R.S.D L.P. (1903) 
a Bolshevik. In 1918 took part 
in the negotiations for the 
conclusion of an economic ag- 
reement with Germany, after- 
wards headed the work of the 
Extraordinary Commission for 
Supply of the Red Army; was 
a member of the Board of 
the Supreme Economic Coun- 
cil and People's Commissar for 
Trade and Industry. In 1919 
entered the diplomatic service. 
During 1922-24 People's Com- 
missar for Foreign Trade. — 99, 
113, 151, 192, 204, 221, 294, 
317, 321, 350, 354, 358, 371, 
375, 386, 396, 401, 423 

Krasnov, Pyotr Nikolayevich 
(1869-1947)— general in the tsa- 
rist army. During 1918-19 com- 



NAME INDEX 



583 



manded the whiteguard Cos- 
sack army on the Don. — 181, 
204 

Krestinsky, Nikolai Nikolayevich 
(1883-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. During 
1918-21 People's Commissar for 
Finance; from December 1919 
to March 1921 Secretary of the 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.).— 204, 223, 
234, 236, 246, 323, 334, 342, 
353, 364, 382, 412-13, 414, 
422, 423, 424, 439, 443, 446 

Krupskaya, Nadezhda Konstanti- 
novna (1869-1939)— jo-ined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1898, associate 
and wife of V. I. Lenin. Started 
revolutionary activities in the 
1890s in the Marxist students' 
circles in St. Petersburg, then 
conducted Social-Democratic 
propaganda among the workers. 
In 1895 joined the St. Petersburg 
League of Struggle for the Eman- 
cipation of the Working Class. 
In August 1896 was arrested 
and sentenced to three years' 
exile. Served her sentence in 
the village of Shushenskoye, 
then in Ufa. In 1901 emigrated 
worked as secretary of the edi- 
torial board of Iskra. Took part 
in organising the Second ~on- 
gress of the R.S.D.L.P. Was 
secretary of the editorial board 
of the Bolshevik papers Vperyod 
and Proletary. After the Octo- 
ber Revolution worked in pub- 
lic education bodies. — 51, 384, 
403 

Krylenko , Nikolai Vasilievich 
(1885-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. Was in 
the first Soviet Government in 
the capacity of member of the 
Committee for Military and 
Naval Affairs, later Supreme 
Commander-in-Chief. From 
1918 onwards worked in So- 
viet justice agencies. — 53, 58, 
61, 263, 269 



Krzhizhanovskaya-Nevzorova, Zi- 
naida Pavlovna (1870-1948)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1898. 
After the October Revolution 
Deputy Manager of the Extra- 
Mural Department of the 
Commissariat for Education. — 
192 

Krzhizhanovsky, Gleb Maximilia- 
novich (1872-1959)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1893, one of the 
organisers of the St. Peters- 
burg League of Struggle for 
the Emancipation of the Work- 
ing Class. After the February 
1917 revolution a member of 
the Bolshevik group in the 
Moscow Soviet. After the Oc- 
tober Revolution worked on 
the rehabilitation and develop- 
ment of Moscow's power econo- 
my; in 1920, on Lenin's as- 
signment, he headed the Com- 
mission for the Electrification 
of Russia (GOELRO).— 337, 
415, 437-38, 447, 456 

Ksandrov, V. N. (1877-1942)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1904 
After the October Revolution 
Chairman of lhe Chief Fuel 
Committee, member of the 
Board of the People's Com- 
missariat for Railways. From 
1920 member of the Board of 
the Supreme Economic Coun- 
cil of the Ukraine and then of 
the U.S.S.R. and of the State 
Planning Commission of the 
U.S.S.R.— 297, 351, 431 

Kudinsky (d. 1918) — Commissar 
at General Headquarters. — 64 

Kugushev, Vyacheslav Alexand- 
rovich (1863-1944)— joined the 
revolutionary movement in the 
1880s. In 1919 head of the 
Procurements Department in 
Ufa Gubernia. In 1920 engaged 
in co-operative work. In 1921 
back at work in the Food 
Commissariat, then worked in 
finance. — 305 



584 



NAME INDEX 



Kilhlmann, Richard von (1873- 
1948)— from August 1917 to 
July 1918 German Foreign 
Secretary, headed the German 
delegation to the Brest-Litovsk 
peace negotiations. — 111 

Kuibyshev , Valerian Vladimiro- 
vich (1888-1935)— jo-ined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. Active 
participant in the October Rev- 
olution, organiser of the armed 
uprising in Samara. Dur- 
ing 1918-19 Commissar and 
member of the Revolutionary 
Military Council of the South- 
ern Group of the Eastern 
Front, then Deputy Chairman 
of the Commission of the All- 
Russia Central Executive Com- 
mittee the Council of People's 
Commissars of the R.S.F.S.R. 
and the C.C., R.C.P.(B.) for 
Affairs of Turkestan. In 1920 
Plenipotentiary of the 
R.S.D.L.P. with the Govern- 
ment of Bukhara; afterwards 
member of the Presidium of 
the All-Russia Central Coun- 
cil of Trade Unions. In May 

1921 became a member of the 
Board of the Supreme Econom- 
ic Council and appointed 
Superintendent of the Chief 
Electricity Board. In April 

1922 elected Secretary of the 
C.C., R.C.P.(B.).— 74, 315 

Kun, Bela (1886-1939)— one of 
the founders and leaders of 
the Communist Party of Hun- 
gary. In 1919 virtual Head of 
the Hungarian Soviet Govern- 
ment, in which he held the 
posts of People's Commissar 
for Foreign Affairs and mem- 
ber of the Board of the People's 
Commissariat for Military Af- 
fairs.— 205, 208, 271, 435 

Kursky, Dmitry Ivanovich (1874- 
1932)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1904. From 1918 to 1928 
People's Commissar for Jus- 



tice of the R.S.F.S.R. During 
1919-20 member of the Revolu- 
tionary Military Council of 
the Republic, Commissar of 
General and Field Headquar- 
ters of the Red Army. — 206, 
262, 393, 414 
Kuzmin. — 53 

Kuzmin, N. N. (1883-1939)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. 
During 1917-18 Commissar of 
the South-Western Front. From 
August 1918 onwards with the 
Soviet troops in the north, 
Commissar of the 6th Army 
member of the Revolutionary 
Military Councils of the 3rd 
and 6th armies, Military Com- 
missar of the Baltic Fleet 
Commander of the 12th Army, 
Assistant Commander of the 
Baltic Fleet.— 209, 352 

Kviring, Emanuil Ionnovich 
(1888-1937)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1912. After 
the February 1917 revolution 
a leader of the Ekaterinoslav 
organisation of the Bolsheviks. 
In 1919 Chairman of the Su- 
preme Economic Council of the 
Ukraine, then Deputy Chief of 
the Political Department of the 
12th Army. During 1920-21 
member of the Soviet delega- 
tion to the peace negotiations 
in Poland. During 1923-25 Sec- 
retary of the C.C., C.P.(B.) 
of the Ukraine. From 1925 on- 
wards Deputy Chairman of the 
Supreme Economic Council, 
the State Planning Commission 
of the U.S.S.R. and held 
other posts.— 237 

L 

Labourbe, Jeanne (1879-1919)— 
daughter of a Paris Commu- 
nard. In 1896 she came to 
Russia, where she worked as 
a teacher. In 1917 started to 



NAME INDEX 



585 



do Party work in the Moscow 
organisation of the 

R.S.D.L.P.(B.). In 1918 or- 
ganised in Moscow a French 
Communist Group. In February 
1919 engaged in underground 
work in Odessa among the 
troops of intervention; edited 
the newspaper Le Communiste 
published for the French sol- 
diers and sailors. In March 
1919 arrested by the French 
intelligence service and shot. 
—136 

Lacis, Martin (Sudrabs, Janis) 
(1888-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1905. After the 
October Revolution a member 
of the Board of the People's 
Commissariat for Internal Af- 
fairs, then member of the 
Board of the Vecheka. From 
1921 onwards held Party, admi- 
nistrative and business posts. — 
245 

Lander, Karl Ivanovich (1884- 
1937)— joined the R.S.D.L.P. 
in 1905. In May 1918 People's 
Commissar for State Control of 
the R.S.F.S.R.— 190, 442 

Lansbury, George (1859-1940)— 
a leader of the British Labour 
Party. Editor of The Daily 
Herald from 1912 to 1922.— 
351 

Lao Hsiu-chao (Liu-Tse-fung) 
(b. 1892)— Chairman of the 
Central Executive Committee 
of the Union of Chinese Work- 
ers in Russia; enjoyed extra- 
territorial rights in the 
R.S.F.S.R. as authorised rep- 
resentative of Chinese citi- 
zens and workers in Russia 
whose interests he defended. 
He was a delegate to the 
First and Second Congresses of 
the Comintern.— 413 

Larin, Y. (Lourie, Mikhail Ale- 
xandrovich) (1882-1932)— Soci- 
al-Democrat, Menshevik. In 



August 1917 admitted to mem- 
bership of the Bolshevik Par- 
ty. After the October Revo- 
lution held administrative and 
business posts; during 1919-20 
represented the Supreme Eco- 
nomic Council on the Supreme 
Council for Transport. — 72, 
85, 98-99, 120, 335 

Lashevich, Mikhail Mlkhailo- 
vich (1884-1928)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1901. From No- 
vember 1918 to March 1919 
Commander of the 3rd Army, 
then member of the Revolu- 
tionary Military Councils of 
the Eastern and Southern 
fronts.— 172, 231, 243, 245, 
249, 251, 252, 256, 258, 270, 
275, 281, 286 

Latukka, Juho (1884-1925)— Fin- 
nish journalist, member of the 
Finnish Social-Democratic Par- 
ty, which he joined in 1904; 
subsequently a Communist. Af- 
ter the defeat of the workers' 
revolution in Finland (1918) 
he lived in Leningrad. — 136 

Lebedev, Semyon Ivanovich — 
Chairman of the Temnikov So- 
viet, Tambov Gubernia, in 
1918.— 110 

Legien, Karl (1861-1920)— Ger- 
man Right-wing Social-Demo- 
crat, a trade union leader. — 
107 

Leiteisen, Moris Gavriovich 
(1897-1939)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P.(B.) in 1917. Took 
part in the October Revolu- 
tion. In 1918 a member of the 
Soviet Mission in Switzerland, 
afterwards sent to Stockholm. 
At the end of 1918, on his 
way to Moscow, he was ar- 
rested in Finland on suspicion 
of carrying on revolutionary 
propaganda; released in 1919 
on the demand of the Soviet 
Government. Up to 1923 worked 
in the People's Commissar- 



586 



NAME INDEX 



iat for Foreign Affairs, later 
engaged in scientific research. — 
154 

Lenin (Ulyanov), Vladimir Ilyich 
(1870-1924).— 48, 51, 58, 136, 
153, 155-56, 162, 197, 276, 283, 
285, 292, 326, 351, 371, 378, 
397-98, 400, 401, 403, 405, 443 

Lentsman , Jan Davidovich 
(1881-1944)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1899. After the 
February 1917 revolution a 
member of the C.C. and the 
Riga Committee of the Social- 
Democratic Party of the Let- 
tish region and member of the 
Soviet. In 1919 Deputy Chair- 
man and Commissar for In- 
ternal Affairs of the Soviet 
Government of Latvia, mem- 
ber of the Revolutionary Mili- 
tary Council of the 15th Army 
then Chief of the Registration 
Department of the R.M.C. of 
the Republic— 266 

Lepeshinsky, Panteleimon Nikola- 
yevich (1868-1944)— joined the 
Social-Democratic movement 
in the early nineties. Active 
participant in the February 
and October revolutions. Af- 
ter the victory of Soviet power 
a member of the Board of the 
R.S.F.S.R. People's Commis- 
sariat for Education, after- 
wards Deputy People's Com- 
missar for Education of Tur- 
kestan.— 318 

Leshchenko, D. I. (1876-1937)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1900. 
Worked on the editorial staffs 
of the newspapers Zvezda and 
Pravda. From 1918 onwards 
Secretary of the People's Com- 
missariat for Education, Ma- 
nager of the All-Russia Cinema 
Committee and held other 
posts. — 386 

Lezhava, Andrei Matveyevich 
(1870-1937)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. During 



1918-20 Chairman of Centro- 
soyuz; from 1920 to 1925 Dep- 
uty People's Commissar for 
Foreign Trade.— 389, 429, 433, 
451, 454, 456 

Lianozov , S. G. — owner of oil- 
fields; after the October Rev- 
olution fled the country. Played 
a prominent part among 
the White emigres resident in 
the Baltic region in 1919. Head- 
ed the "Government of the 
Russian North-Western Re- 
gion" which was set up in Au- 
gust 1919 by General March 
head of the British Mission in 
Estonia, and which existed sev- 
eral months. — 285 

Liebknecht, Karl (1871-1919)— an 
outstanding leader of the Ger- 
man and international work- 
ers' movement; a leader of 
the Left wing of German Social- 
Democracy, one of the found- 
ers of the Communist Party 
of Germany and leader of the 
uprising of the Berlin work- 
ers in January 1919. After 
the suppression of the upris- 
ing he was brutally mur- 
dered.— 107, 154, 196, 360 

Litvinov , Maxim Maximovich 
(1876-1951)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1898. After the 
October Revolution Soviet rep- 
resentative in Great Britain. 
In 1918 appointed member of 
the Board of the People's 
Commissariat for Foreign Af- 
fairs. In 1921 became Deputy 
People's Commissar for For- 
eign Affairs. From 1930 to 
1939 P.C. for Foreign Affairs; 
subsequently Deputy P.C. for 
Foreign Affairs and Ambassa- 
dor in the U.S.A.— 153, 224, 
326 

Lloyd George, David (1863-1945) 
— British statesman and dip- 
lomat, leader of the Liberal 
Party. From 1916 to 1922 



NAME INDEX 



587 



Prime Minister. Engineered mil- 
itary intervention against the 
Soviet state.— 224, 225, 386, 
421 

Lobova, V. N. (1888-1924)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P. in 1905. 
During 1920-21 engaged in Par- 
ty work in Moscow, Perm and 
Samara; afterwards worked in 
the Agitation and Propaganda 
Department of the Party's Cen- 
tral Committee and in Sibe- 
ria.— 346 

Lomonosov, Yuri Vladimirovich 
(b. 1876)— in 1919 a member 
of the Boards of the Supreme 
Economic Council and the Com- 
missariat for Railways, au- 
thorised agent of the Council 
of People's Commissars abroad 
where he handled Soviet rail- 
way orders.— 321, 348, 354, 456 

Lomov, A. (Oppokov, Georgi Ip- 
politovich) (1888-1938)— joined 
the R.S.D.L.P. in 1903. From 
1918 to 1921 a member of the 
Board and Deputy Chairman 
of the Supreme Economic Coun- 
cil in charge of fuel sup- 
ply.— 287, 352, 355 

Longuet, Jean (1876-1938)— a 
leader of the French Socialist 
Party and the Second Interna- 
tional, publicist. Was op- 
posed to the French Socialist 
Party becoming affiliated to 
the Comintern and to the es- 
tablishment of a Communist 
Party in France. — 154 

Loriot, Ferdinand (1870-1930)— 
French socialist. From 1920 to 
1927 a member of the French 
Communist Party. — 44 

Loti, Pierre (1850-1923)— French 
bourgeois writer. — 154 

Luganovsky (Portugeis), Emma- 
nuil Viktorovich (1885-1940)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1902. 
From December 1917 to May 
1918 a member of the Soviet 
Government of the Ukraine. 



In October 1918 authorised 
agent of the People's Commis- 
sariat for Food of the 
R.S.F.S.R.; during 1919-21 
worked in the Council of La- 
bour and Defence and the 
Supreme Economic Council. — 
64 

Lunacharsky, Anatoly Vasilievich 
(1875-1933)— joined the revo- 
lutionary movement in the 
early nineties. After the Sec- 
ond Congress of the R.S.D.L.P. 
(1903) a Bolshevik. After the 
October Revolution up to 1929 
People's Commissar for Edu- 
cation. In 1919 authorised 
agent of the All-Russia Cen- 
tral Executive Committee for 
combating desertion in Kost- 
roma.— 229, 366, 369, 392 

Luteraan, Barend (b. 1878) — 
Dutch Social-Democrat, jour- 
nalist. Later a member of the 
Independent Socialist Party 
and then the Communist Work- 
ers' Party of the Nether- 
lands. — 58 

Lutovinov, Yuri Khrisanfovich 
(1887-1924)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. After the 
October Revolution an active 
participant in the Civil War on 
the Don and in the Ukraine. 
In 1918 a member of the 
C.C., C.P.(B.) of the Ukraine. 
Later engaged in trade union 
and administrative work. In 
1920 became a member of the 
C.C. of the Metalworkers' Uni- 
on and of the Presidium of the 
All-Russia Central Executive 
Committee. — 226 

Luxemburg , Rosa (Junius) 
(1871-1919) — an outstanding 
leader of the Polish and German 
workers' movement, a leader 
of the Left wing of the Sec- 
ond International. Was one 
of the sponsors of the Inter- 
nationale Group in Germany, 



588 



NAME INDEX 



which afterwards assumed the 
name of Spartacus group, then 
Spartacus League. During the 
November revolution in Ger- 
many in 1918 was one of the 
leaders of the revolutionary 
vanguard of the German work- 
ers. Took a leading part in 
the Inaugural Congress of the 
German Communist Party. In 
January 1919 she was arrest- 
ed and brutally murdered. — 
106, 154, 196 
Lyubarsky , Nikolai Markovich 
(1887-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1906. From 1918 
to 1923 in the diplomatic serv- 
ice, a member of the Board 
of the Department of Soviet 
Propaganda of the People's 
Commissariat for Foreign Af- 
fairs.— 326 



M 

Makhno, Nester Ivanovich 
(1884-1934)— leader of anar- 
chist-kulak detachments in the 
Ukraine. He and his follow- 
ers posed as champions of 
the peasants' interests in order 
to win over the peasant masses. 
Makhno accommodated him- 
self to the changing political 
and military situation, con- 
ducting military operations 
now against the whiteguards, 
now against the Red Army 
(in the summer of 1918 he 
carried on for a time a parti- 
san struggle against the land- 
owners, German occupation- 
ists and the Hetman). During 
the first half of 1919, with the 
re-establishment of Soviet pow- 
er in the Ukraine, Makhno 
took a sharply hostile stand 
towards the dictatorship of the 
proletariat. In the spring of 
1921 the Makhno bands were 



routed by the Soviet troops. — 
213 

Malinovsky, P. P. (1869-1943)— 
joined the R.S.D.L.P. in 1904. 
After the October Revolution 
Chairman of the Commission 
of the Moscow Soviet for the 
Protection of Monuments of 
Art and Ancient Buildings, 
Civil Commissar of the Krem- 
lin. In March 1918 Acting 
People's Commissar for the 
Properties of the Republic. 
—82 

Malyshev , Sergei Vasilievich 
(1877-1938)— joined the 
R.S.D.L.P. in 1902. After the 
October Revolution worked in 
the People's Commissariat for 
Labour, the Food Commissa- 
riat, Centrosoyuz and ot